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wiring halogen lights

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stewart

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Hi all
I hope someone can help with this. I want to replace my single light in the study with some halogen lights. I've gone for some mains halogen lights so I don't have to worry about transformers. my question is how many can be wired up to one switch? I plan to wire each one into a junction box unless anyone can suggest an alternative.
Cheers all
Stewart
 

RogerS

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Last time I looked at a light switch I seem to remember it being rated at 5A (resistive load). That's 1200 watts. Most mains halogen lights are 50w so you can do the maths :wink: It's possible that these lights present an inductive load...so that will affect the number.

You might be better off trying the electrical forum on Screwfix.

The other thing to bear in mind is the heat generated by these (I'm assuming that you are planning to insert them into your ceiling maybe?). If so make sure there's nothing flammable in the immediate vicinity of them or above them.
 

OLD

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Lighting circuits are usually fused(mcb) at 6 amps .watts = volts x amps so you can work out the total for the circuit .
The new lamps will be fed by extending and looping in the existing feed wires to old lamp, method of connection depends on fitting and what is most straight forward.
New regulations mean this work is to be done/ checked by a electrician.
 

stewart

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thanks roger
i'll check it out now
the rather brief leaflet that came with the lights says that if they are to be wired in a ring main a 3amp fused connection unit should be installed. I hope there is a combined switch and fuse unit so i can access the fuse without lifting the floor above if it blows - guess i better get over to screwfix quick!
cheers
stewart
 

stewart

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thanks OLD
i'll have to get someone to check it for me, then - still. must cost less than having someone do it as well
stewart
 

stewart

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thanks for the follow up OLD and the links. i've had a look at them - a useful clarification!
i suppose what happens when a number of halogens replace a single pendant light is that they are all connected to the same switch and the way for me to go is to wire in my halogens to the switch wire. this is why i thought adding a fused switch would also be useful protection?
 

RogerS

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I'm not sure that I would go to the bother of fitting a fused switch since the lighting circuit is (or should be) already fused at a suitable level ..as an earlier post suggested.

I guess the only other thing that we've not discussed is the switch on load (very, very short term) of the halogen bulbs (and must confess I don't know the answer as to whether this is/is not a problem with these). Some devices have a very high initial switch on current surge and depending on the fuse characteristics, the fuse may blow or not.
 
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