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Winter storage, wax on tools?

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D_W

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Briwax above is nice - I have used minwax (probably not sold there), johnson's (maybe the same) and briwax.

All do the same thing for rust protection, but the toluene in briwax dissolves faster and it seems to be more liquid and less wax (Their MSDS suggests same) so it dries really fast.

There's no great reason to wait for wax to haze when preventing rust, though. Just wipe it on thinly or wipe it very thinly and then wipe off.

Beeswax and mineral oil mix as mentioned above if you want something non drying.
 

furnace

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I'm trying this stuff on machine tables of bandsaw and planer/thicknesser this year. I've tried various waxes in the past and all have "failed". So far, it seems good - polish the exposed metal with wire wool/scotchbrite beforehand; goes on v thin, would probably cover a football field and despite reaching dew point temps recently (these machines are in an unheated space and rarely used) surfaces are still perfect.

 

Jacob

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Linseed oil half n half with white spirit leaves a thin hard coat.
 

Fergie 307

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Duly applied to cast iron bed (bandsaw).
A week later (cool weather), surface is still tacky. Enough to pick up sawdust.
I am not impressed for 'winter use'. Storage? Perhaps?
Back to wax.
Brilliant stuff, but surprised anyone would recommend it for this. I coat the underside of my cars with it, and the reason it is so good at preventing corrosion is specifically because it doesn't dry out, it always remains very slightly tacky. Agree with the comments made about the applicator gun that comes with it, pretty useless. I either spray it on with a spray gun or apply it with a brush. The only thing their own applicator is any good for is small areas, so maybe to restore the coating after doing some work where you have had to remove it. 'I check the cars every year in the summer and retouch as needed but the previous application is always stil a bit gooey. Used to swear by Waxoyl, but find this is even better.
 

pe2dave

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OK, a compromise. I've a litre of ACF 50 and I'm a Yorkshireman.
I've planes and chisels that will rust in my workshop.

1. Blow 'em out / wipe down / strip down.
2. Brush on sparingly on all parts of the plane except the sole / sides.
3. Put to one side (on a clean surface - now there's a challenge!)
4. I had some Rustins wax. Warm and with a clean rag (another challenge?) wipe on the sole / sides.

Put back onto clean surface till wax won't rub off easily.
Put away.

At once per year, my one litre of ACF 50 should last ....

Now looking around for rusty steel (waxoyl use in mind).

Hope that's of use to others.

I can now use my plane through the winter (if it warms up a bit) and only need to re-wax the sole.
The ACF50 will collect sawdust, but it won't harm.
 

D_W

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Curious as to why it's an advantage at this point to switch from wax (which prevents rust and doesn't attract dust) to a heavy hydrotreated oil that may be removed from the tool more easily and will collect wood dust (which will attract water).
 

raffo

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Seems like there's a desire to buy something, rather than just making that mix you recommend. The draw of something sold 10x the price or more of something equally as effective (or better) is perplexing.
 

D_W

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I think there's a cheap thrill in learning what's underlying out there and cheap, and understanding the model of how things are formulated (so you can make them yourself). It's a relief to not have to go out and try to find things. I thought I'd ordered gear oil on the spur of the moment, but I think i put it in the amazon basket and didn't - and I'm glad that I didn't because I can't think of a reason that I'd need it as the way to make food safe oil move a little slower is just to add beeswax.

(not to mention, it's food safe).

Another thing that I noticed over time is that the average person on here may be thinking they'd like to put wax on a tool, but don't want to because "it has to dry" before rubbing it off. It doesn't. Just wipe it on and then lightly wipe most of it off and ignore any more detail than that. No waiting (if a drying wax is wanted).
 

Ttrees

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Linseed oil half n half with white spirit leaves a thin hard coat.
Just done that last week on some lengths of metal, well I used paint thinners.
bit of sediment and about a shot of the oil left in the bottle, and a maybe a double of the thinner.
Applied with a paint brush, took a week to dry, and only touch dry now, few big globs left behind.

I'll be scraping off the edges of these soon so can report back, should one want to remove it.
I couldn't see this stuff being good for much tools unless one wasn't going to use them for well over a year at the least
Leaves a nice finish for bare metal, nice and thick like a few thin coats of paint would provide, but not a shelled finish.
I will be doing this again for the odd thing.
Will report back
Cheers
Tom
 

pe2dave

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Seems like there's a desire to buy something, rather than just making that mix you recommend. The draw of something sold 10x the price or more of something equally as effective (or better) is perplexing.
My case? Simply caring for my tools which have served me well. YMMV
 

D_W

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My case? Simply caring for my tools which have served me well. YMMV
That's a line that I"d use if I were mixing distillate and a common heavy oil and marking up 5x.

I'd be pretty careful to not mention that I was mixing an industrially produced gear oil and distillate and marking it up 5x, though - and would rather make it out like it was something revolutionary.
 

AESamuel

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Curious as to why it's an advantage at this point to switch from wax (which prevents rust and doesn't attract dust) to a heavy hydrotreated oil that may be removed from the tool more easily and will collect wood dust (which will attract water).
Wax doesn't work in my workshop, I've tried beeswax, paste wax, renaissance wax and none of them wholly prevented rust. Granted my workshop is not well sealed, goes through big temperature changes and is right next to the sea so worst case scenario really.

Best thing I've found are vci emitters in an enclosed area. I always wipe down metal with something similar to wd40 after use before putting it away, and regularly re apply if I haven't used the tools in a while. I'm currently experimenting with shellac on my chisels (not bevel or back) to see if that offers good protection. I've not found any single method to work, it always seems to need a multi pronged approach.
 

Grantx

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Gt85 is excellent stuff, cheap, great smelling, lasts long, super easy to apply.

I spray GT85 on all my iron work. Spray, light wipe, no problems. Lathe bed, Mortimer, bandsaw all still have perfect beds and tables. Even if there is sawdust on them, it soaks into the dust and protects the metal underneath.

smells nice too, workshoppy kind of smell. 🙂
 

pe2dave

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A litre of ACF 50, bugging me that I couldn't use it (as delivered).
an experiment. Compressor, small airbrush, 2:1 reduction (white spirit) and it goes on
*very* thinly! And slightly warmer, 10 dec C or more.
See if / how well it dries!
I sprayed a bunch of chisels, though the 'mist' would be ideal for the planes!
 

AESamuel

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A litre of ACF 50, bugging me that I couldn't use it (as delivered).
an experiment. Compressor, small airbrush, 2:1 reduction (white spirit) and it goes on
*very* thinly! And slightly warmer, 10 dec C or more.
See if / how well it dries!
I sprayed a bunch of chisels, though the 'mist' would be ideal for the planes!
I'll be interested to hear what it's like once on. Especially how it fares for "in use" tools, how often it needs to be reapplied on working chisels and handplanes. My workshop is next to the sea, has big temp swings and not well sealed so corrosion is a real issue for me. Long term storage is one thing but I need something that protects them while using too.
 

pe2dave

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I'll be interested to hear what it's like once on. Especially how it fares for "in use" tools, how often it needs to be reapplied on working chisels and handplanes. My workshop is next to the sea, has big temp swings and not well sealed so corrosion is a real issue for me. Long term storage is one thing but I need something that protects them while using too.
My chisels and planes gather rust (but slowly), hence my quest for a workable solution.
I *think* on planes, I'll only have to wipe over the soles after use (done anyway). For chisels
I'm not sure, though setting up the airbrush wasn't a chore - if lazy I'll wipe down with a rag
soaked in diluted ACF50. 5 seconds?
 

Droogs

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My workshop is literally 50m from the North Sea and is in an old rope/net drying shed. I use Boshield B9 on my hand tools and wipe on Wurth Woodslide for my machine beds. Only tool I've had rust problem on was my #7 which I forgot to do before closing up at the start of the pandemic and even then it was light spotty surface rust as previous coverings of B9 still gave some protection.
 

Droogs

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pe2dave

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Bit late @Droogs when I have the ACF 50 in hand. This years must have used all of 50ml, so I guess it will last me out! I'll try and remember Boshfield in the next life!
 

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