• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Window frame mould removal advice

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Designer1

Member
Joined
4 Mar 2021
Messages
11
Reaction score
2
Location
York
Hello.

Been to see this recently, customer wanted to know if the mould can be removed? The frame with the grey windowsill is the normal, dry window frame. The white windowsill is the bathroom window frame with the mould. Any ideas on how to remove it?

Thanks in advance,
Designer1
IMG_20210515_115809.jpg
IMG_20210515_115749.jpg
IMG_20210515_115730.jpg
 

Rorschach

Wicker man.
Joined
6 Jan 2016
Messages
5,867
Reaction score
829
Location
Devon
Deal with why it becomes mouldy and the rest will take care of itself.
It's a window, in the UK, how do you propose to do that? I have never yet seem a window that doesn't suffer from mould.

Clean the mould with bleach and then re-paint with a mould resistant paint, this will need re-doing every 5 years approx.
 

Adam W.

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
18 Apr 2021
Messages
800
Reaction score
668
Location
London, Jutland.
It's a window, in the UK, how do you propose to do that? I have never yet seem a window that doesn't suffer from mould.

Clean the mould with bleach and then re-paint with a mould resistant paint, this will need re-doing every 5 years approx.

I can see it's a window, thanks.

It suffers from cold bridging, you propose a temporary solution and a continuous maintenance schedule. The OP wanted to get rid of it, which suggests that he wants a permanent solution.

Note the other window doesn't suffer from mould, hence my suggestion of dealing with why it gets mouldy in the first place.
 

paulrbarnard

Established Member
Joined
5 Mar 2017
Messages
408
Reaction score
345
Location
Shepton Mallet, UK
Last edited:

Rorschach

Wicker man.
Joined
6 Jan 2016
Messages
5,867
Reaction score
829
Location
Devon
@Adam W. There isn't a permanent solution. The other window is ok now, it won't last forever, mould will eventually get it unless the maintenance schedule is shorter than the time it takes for mould to take hold. In a bathroom the mould moves faster than the maintenance.

Looking at the pictures again, all the windows have mould, it's just worse/more noticeable on the bathroom window as you would expect.
 

Adam W.

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
18 Apr 2021
Messages
800
Reaction score
668
Location
London, Jutland.
Have you been to the house, because your answer sounds like you have ?

There's a permanent solution to mould and it's heat and ventilation. Once the m/c of the surfaces drop below a certain level mould spores will not germinate and develop into fruiting bodies.
 

Rorschach

Wicker man.
Joined
6 Jan 2016
Messages
5,867
Reaction score
829
Location
Devon
Have you been to the house, because your answer sounds like you have ?

There's a permanent solution to mould and it's heat and ventilation. Once the m/c of the surfaces drop below a certain level mould spores will not germinate and develop into fruiting bodies.
You're right, but it's also totally impractical/not cost effective given the UK climate, especially in a bathroom. Regular maintenance however is very little effort and should form part of standard cleaning anyway.

I would ask if you have a totally mould free house, but I think I know what you would say.
 

J-G

Established Member
Joined
20 Jan 2014
Messages
755
Reaction score
157
Location
ATHERSTONE
Well, I'm in the UK and have lived in 8 different houses over the past nearly 80 years and have never had any problem with mould on window cills in bathrooms - or anywhere else for that matter - and I am not fastidious as far as general maintenance is concerned !
 

Rorschach

Wicker man.
Joined
6 Jan 2016
Messages
5,867
Reaction score
829
Location
Devon
I suspect I can predict all future responses to this thread now.

Anyway I have said my bit, clean it, paint with a mould resistant paint, have a beer.
 

eribaMotters

Established Member
Joined
12 Feb 2010
Messages
354
Reaction score
106
Location
Formby, Merseyside
1 part bleach to 4 parts water. Wipe it on and leave. Repeat after 48 hours. Wash down next day and all should be well. If the house is not correctly heated and ventilated it would be an idea to wipe down with this solution whenever the bathroom is given a clean. No reason why the bleach/water mix could not be left in a spray bottle for this purpose.

Colin
 

Rorschach

Wicker man.
Joined
6 Jan 2016
Messages
5,867
Reaction score
829
Location
Devon
1 part bleach to 4 parts water. Wipe it on and leave. Repeat after 48 hours. Wash down next day and all should be well. If the house is not correctly heated and ventilated it would be an idea to wipe down with this solution whenever the bathroom is given a clean. No reason why the bleach/water mix could not be left in a spray bottle for this purpose.

Colin
The bottle must be UV resistant if you do this.
 

EddyCurrent

Established Member
Joined
4 Nov 2015
Messages
234
Reaction score
83
Location
Cumberland, uk
The OP said, "customer wanted", which means they were in a position to offer some kind of service.
I can't believe that someone in a position to offer such a service would ask such a basic question about mould removal when even my grandchildren know the answer. Am I missing something here ?
 

Sandyn

Established Member
Joined
19 Jul 2020
Messages
770
Reaction score
570
Location
Scotland
Hi Designer, I see you are fairly new to the forum. Welcome!!! I somehow feel as if I should apologise for how the thread has developed. It is nothing to do with you. Hopefully you will get lots of helpful suggestions.
I think both ideas are good, ventilation/ paint, but my experience with this type of problem is ventilation, ventilation, ventilation. Tackle the source of the problem first. Is there a good extractor in the bathroom? with a good long over-run to get the water vapour removed after a shower/bath?

I also use a dehumidifier in the bathroom for about an hour after a shower when I don't want to pump all the hot air out through the wall.

For cleaning up, as Colin suggested I use a bleach solution, but you do get some effective proprietary solutions for that. Bleach is very cheap :).
I have a stained glass single glazed window in my bathroom. Every so often I get a toothbrush (just use the wife's) and a bleach solution, some clean warm water in a pump spray and a wet dry vacuum. I scrub the lead borders with the toothbrush and bleach solution then flood the area with water from the sprayer while vacuuming it up to remove all the rubbish.
I'm not sure where the mould is in the centre picture? Is there some at the corner of the white painted area? That could be caused by a thermal bridge causing a cold spot. Then if appropriate use some anti mould paint after cleaning it completely.
 

pgrbff

Established Member
Joined
29 Oct 2020
Messages
152
Reaction score
42
Location
Langhe, Piemonte
It's a window, in the UK, how do you propose to do that? I have never yet seem a window that doesn't suffer from mould.

Clean the mould with bleach and then re-paint with a mould resistant paint, this will need re-doing every 5 years approx.
If you have the correct ventilation you are far less likely to get mould. I go for 8 or more air changes an hour and usualy install a fan with timer and humidity sensor. I lived in Ireland for 20 years in an 18th century stone house with no damp problems at all.
 

Rorschach

Wicker man.
Joined
6 Jan 2016
Messages
5,867
Reaction score
829
Location
Devon
If you have the correct ventilation you are far less likely to get mould. I go for 8 or more air changes an hour and usualy install a fan with timer and humidity sensor. I lived in Ireland for 20 years in an 18th century stone house with no damp problems at all.
That's fine if two conditions are met, 1. you have the money to pay for the lost heating by changing the air so often, 2. the air outside is drier than the air inside. Where I live it's wetter outside than it is inside for large parts of the year, ventilation is of course needed for healthy living but it does nothing to dry out the house.
 

pgrbff

Established Member
Joined
29 Oct 2020
Messages
152
Reaction score
42
Location
Langhe, Piemonte
That's fine if two conditions are met, 1. you have the money to pay for the lost heating by changing the air so often, 2. the air outside is drier than the air inside. Where I live it's wetter outside than it is inside for large parts of the year, ventilation is of course needed for healthy living but it does nothing to dry out the house.
It removes large amounts of saturated air quickly so it is less likely to condense in the room. I assume most homes have some form of heating. You will then still possibly get some problems in cold corners where there is less air circulation. I buy household name fans on ebay for less than £50, normally >£200. I guess you have to choose then. Run the fan for 10 minutes and lose some heat or have a mouldy bathroom. It's quite damp in Ireland too.
 

baldkev

Established Member
Joined
29 Apr 2020
Messages
160
Reaction score
52
Location
devon
In terms of the cleaning, i wouldn't use bleach. Years back i was taught that theres different bactrria that cause mould and bleach kills off the weaker type, so the mould generally comes back blacker after bleach..... which is why you get poroper mould and mildew treatments.... i personally would use oxalic acid to treat it, it should kill off the bacteria and restore the oroginal colour. Then do a good job of redecorating the window to help seal it again.

As said above, the root cause needs to be addressed as well
 

pils

Established Member
Joined
15 Mar 2016
Messages
106
Reaction score
37
Location
oxfordshire
If you have the correct ventilation you are far less likely to get mould. I go for 8 or more air changes an hour and usualy install a fan with timer and humidity sensor. I lived in Ireland for 20 years in an 18th century stone house with no damp problems at all.
Of interest:
1. did that stone house have any mechanical ventilation?
2. Stone walls lime mortar/plaster/render?
 
Top