• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Window Advice

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

phil p

Established Member
Joined
29 Feb 2008
Messages
259
Reaction score
4
Hi,

I wonder if I could ask some advice.

I have a prefabricated garage, concrete panel type bolted together, that I want to convert into some sort of workshop, I'm only a DIYer so it's only somewhere to tinker around in (and somewhere to hide from the wife in the winter) as I can't really get the car in so thought I would use the space.

I don't mind spending a few quid on it as I'm going to insulate it with Kingspan or something similar (may be on later asking advice on this!) and board it, however looking at the window, it's seen better days.

It's the one that originally came with the garage, cheap as chips, only looks like 2 x 2 softwood with the glass puttied in, so before boarding things up it will need to be renewed as it's started to rot, mainly my fault because I never maintained the outside.

What are my options?

It looks around 3 x 2, and I would probably stretch to a pvc window, however I don't think you can get the size, and even if you could the frame would be too thick.

I could try and make another, and if I have to , what should I use? and what would be the easiest way to make it?

Any info would be appreciated.

Thanks.
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,028
Reaction score
500
Location
Bristol
Your cheapest and possibly most practical option is to find a ready-made window to use. Window installers will have thousands that they throw away, some of which will still be perfectly ok, or will have been made to mis-measured dimensions. Go round to a few and see what they have piled up waiting for the next skip. Alternatively, people who don't like throwing away a perfectly good window will often list them on Freecycle, Gumtree or Trade-it and be glad to see it go to be used. I'm assuming that you will be able to adapt the size of the hole a bit by building up a timber sub-frame to fill in the gaps.

Alternatively, have a go at making one - it can be as simple or as complicated as you want. Buying a new-made double-glazed unit to the size you need is not really very expensive, though you may be able to salvage one without the frame.
 

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
20,748
Reaction score
1,751
Location
Derbyshire
Make one - copy the old one if you can't see a better way? Redwood.
Old garage turned into workshop suggests damp, so you have a chance here to build in passive de-humidifier. Basically keep it single glazed and design/modify it so that condensation drains off to the outside, as was normal with trad windows, even inward opening French windows.
 

jimi43

Established Member
Joined
12 Mar 2009
Messages
6,921
Reaction score
2
Location
Kent - the Garden of England
Andy and Jacob make good points...added together.

When I put a new window in my workshop extension...I trawled FleaBay and Freecycle and manage to get 20 double glazed units for a tenner (the heavy weight inhibits bidding for only local people)....and a new complete opening unit again for only a tenner.....



You have to wait a bit for them to come up but they do eventually. Or...if you can find a reclamation yard near you..they tend to have old double glazed units which you can sort through and pick up for next to nothing.

When installing mine...I used the raw unit in a simple treated wood frame and the wall membrane was brought up such that any condensation ran down into it...under and outside via a small gap. Capping was then used to hide this.

Hope this helps

Jim
 

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
20,748
Reaction score
1,751
Location
Derbyshire
Sounds good.
The advantage of single glazing is that you get more condensation and hence more de-humidification, so it's a trade-off against insulation. I've been experimenting with this in my current project with some large old windows, and have fitted little gullies and drain pipes to transport the condensation. You really notice it in winter - massive run off, with big icicles if it's cold enough.
One useful detail I found by chance - a roller blind wrongly sized. If the inside of the window is part screened such that there is a gap top and bottom, you get a reverse chimney effect and warm air is drawn down through the gap between the screen and the inner face of the glass, resulting in even more condensation. Heat is lost unfortunately. But I could envisage a carefully built drying house using this principle, with no energy input except solar.
 
Top