• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Why so cheap?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

gidon

Established Member
Joined
19 Mar 2003
Messages
2,546
Reaction score
0
Location
West Dartmoor, Devon, UK
Hi
Decided to pop into a local car boot sale and couldn't resist this Stanley plough plane for £10:

Axminster list the mosts recent version of this plane for £120, but I've looked on Ebay and unfortunately it doesn't appear to be a bargain - although not a bad price considering it's in almost unused condition.
So why is it so cheap - is it really meant to be that bad? I'm going up to my shed shortly for a little play, but thought is would be a useful purchase for cleaning out those grooves and rebates?
Would appreciate any comments - do people still use this planes much?
Cheers
Gidon
 

Philly

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2003
Messages
6,874
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset, England.
Geat timing Gidon- I just won one on Ebay-sorry Mate, beat you at £7.50! :lol:
So come on Hand tool experts-what's the low down on this lil piece?
Philly :D
 

gidon

Established Member
Joined
19 Mar 2003
Messages
2,546
Reaction score
0
Location
West Dartmoor, Devon, UK
Nice one Philly! Maybe they're just aren't fashionable!
Also picked up a nice stanley yankee screwdriver for £2. I may have to check out these car boot sales more often.
I was in Launceston though yesterday - and saw some chap selling Stanley planes at Ebay+ prices - was quite suprised. A #6 in not good condition for £60!
Looking forward to compare notes Philly anyway. May see you at Yandles - if I go it'll be on the Saturday morning - although not sure how early I'll make it. Will let you know.
Cheers
Gidon
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Good lord, have I inadvertantly stumbled onto a pair of c*ll*ct*rs...? :p

So chaps, why is this tool so undervalued? I have good news and bad. It does work, and some people even prefer them (they claim). The bad news? Well, I mean, c'mon. It does rather look like someone decided to use failed joke dog turds for the handles, doesn't it... :? I think it simply boils down to most people preferring the looks of the older models. Mebbe the same old problem with modern Stanleys too; not so hot on the finishing and so forth. I don't know. I saw one once but I ran away quickly and avoided the seller paying me to take it away... :wink: Still, for a tenner (and under!) it's not too bad I reckon, and will add a little ballast for the rest of the plough/combination plane slope. (Last one to the bottom's a single fence rod Record #040!!!!! :lol: )

Funny, kept falling over ghastly Anant planes this morning. Dunno why. Can't recall ever seeing one in the wild before. Managed, yet again, to resist asking for the best price on the Bedrock #6 that the bloke's been trying to flog for about a year now. Came very close to succumbing to a ratchety, screwdrivery, bracey thing that I can't find in any of my books. Finally made do with a Thos. Turner & Co 12" back saw with pristine split nuts. First tool I've bought for simply ages 'cos I'm trying to save for Tools 2004, but I s'pose at 50p it won't break the bank and I do so need yet another saw to sharpen... :roll: :oops:

Cheers, Alf
 

Philly

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2003
Messages
6,874
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset, England.
Alf,
Cheers, I assumed the crappy plastic was a big factor! :lol: I could use some more cutters though, so there you go. Besides, need to keep the "collector in training" thing rumbling. (although SWMBO has rumbled me-major headaches on my spending this weekend :shock: )
Gidon,
Will be at Yandles bright and early on Sat so PM me and we'll meet up (at last!)
regards
Philly :D
 

gidon

Established Member
Joined
19 Mar 2003
Messages
2,546
Reaction score
0
Location
West Dartmoor, Devon, UK
Thanks Alf. Agree the handle is an embarassment to Stanley! But apart from that I quite like it. Tried the 12mm blade, flattened the back pretty quickly and sharpened the blade at the 35 degree ground bevel. Slipped it in, adjusted depth and tightened. Then had a lot of trouble untightening! Only has a knurled knob which is tricky to undo if you do it too tight.

Adjusted the plane for a 1/4 inch rebate and was impressed how easy it was to produce. The main difficulty is holding the plane vertical. You have to do this by eye until the plane reaches the depth-stop. I've never used a plane like this before so need practice. But the rebate produced in a few minutes was close to that produced with a router, and possible on small pieces of timber which can be awkward with a router.

Full plouging cuts are harder, because in my hands the plane really wants to tip from vertical and tear out a chunk of timber. But to be honest I got this mainly for tuning router cut rebates and grooves / housing joints so really can't complain.

All in all very impressed for £10 - quite a versatile little fella'.

Alf look after those pennies ... and your latest woodworking acquisition will still seem like a small fortune :lol:.

Philly will give you a shout towards the end of the week if I make up my mind by then! Would be good to meet up.

Cheers

Gidon
 

devonwoody

Established Member
Joined
11 Apr 2004
Messages
13,472
Reaction score
14
Location
Paignton Devon
I have had my record model 30 years and it comes out occassionally,(the plane)

Dont worry about the handle just keep the blades sharp and straight.
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
3
Location
SE London - NW Kent
Philly and Gidon,

The handle does look horrible but Tony showed us how to make nice wooden ones - I reckon you should both customise them and show us the results!
 

Philly

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2003
Messages
6,874
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset, England.
Chris,
Great idea-I'll just put that on my "To-do" list. (along with a thousand others..... :lol: )
regards
Philly :D
 

Shady

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2004
Messages
838
Reaction score
0
The irony is that they're actually better than the Stanley 45/ 55 for grooving, because the 'sole' is significantly longer fore and aft of the blade (as opposed to the 'skates' on the older planes). These are a classic example of an unfashionable tool that does one particular job really rather well. Rehandle it so that you don't vomit when you look at it, and you got yourself a real bargain...
 

gidon

Established Member
Joined
19 Mar 2003
Messages
2,546
Reaction score
0
Location
West Dartmoor, Devon, UK
Good idea Chris - would improve the thing no end!

Shady - those are just the words I wanted to hear! I've already found it quite handy, but my works cut out putting a sharp edge on the remaining 9 blades!

Cheers

Gidon

(Philly - have you got yours yet? I bet you're too busy playing with you new t/saw aren't you!)
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Shady":34f17fh1 said:
The irony is that they're actually better than the Stanley 45/ 55 for grooving, because the 'sole' is significantly longer fore and aft of the blade (as opposed to the 'skates' on the older planes).
Oh really? Didn't realise that. Interesting. Hmm... Nope, I do not need one. I will be strong.

Probably :oops:

Cheers, Alf

Who really doesn't need this kind of helpful thread... :roll:
 

Shady

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2004
Messages
838
Reaction score
0
Yeah: moulding cutters are a great source of 'hours of endless fun' on the sharpening front. FWIW, I use water slip stones and cones (1000, 4000, 8000) and simple 'honing guides' (this glorifies what are actually just blocks of scrap wood that are cut at the relevant bedding angle of the plane: I just hold the iron against the block in one hand, and use the block to keep a constant honing angle for the stone) for most of them most of the time.

If you're using one cutter more than the others, or for a particularly important job, then it's worth taking the above approach to get it useably sharp, but then cutting a profile in a long scrap of hardwood, saw this up to give 3 pieces, and line them with appropriate grades of wet or dry paper (spray glued on), to give a 'cutter bespoke scarysharp' set up. I find scarysharp too much mucking about for normal blade work, but this does allow you to get a very good edge on a tricky shape if you really need it. Show us some mouldings from it when you can!
 

Shady

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2004
Messages
838
Reaction score
0
Alf, yeah - another acquisition target for you! 45s and 55s are great fun to own, and do a reasonable job if you're prepared to muck around setting up, but there are design compromises to achieve their all round utility (and the relative sole lengths/mouth size is one - another is the bedding angle). The 50 is less attractive to collectors, but more useable within its limits.

I suspect that the 45/55 inspiration was originally very much market driven - an attempt to cash in on the utility/portability of the one tool, as opposed to a full set of moulding planes. This is one of the reasons that stock selection is so important for them: they really don't like knots or difficult grain. I use wooden moulding planes (my grandfather's set 8) ) with a high bedding angle (a la HNT Gordon) for all hardwood moulding work: they are less flexible, but more capable within their limits: they leave a 'polished' surface that takes a finish superbly.
 

gidon

Established Member
Joined
19 Mar 2003
Messages
2,546
Reaction score
0
Location
West Dartmoor, Devon, UK
Shady - thanks for the tips. Fortunately all the profiles I have at the mo are straight - still time consuming though!
Cheers
Gidon
 

Philly

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2003
Messages
6,874
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset, England.
Here's my "beauty".......


That handle really is the grossiest thing this side of a cheap indian plane..
Lot of kit for the cash though. Gonna have to make a new handle though.
regards
Philly :D
 

Shady

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2004
Messages
838
Reaction score
0
Yup: functional, but that handle must rate right up there in the 'vom-o-matic' tool styling hall of fame: who can think of some others? Those translucent yellow chisel handles are pretty bad.... :shock:
 

Shady

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2004
Messages
838
Reaction score
0
I want it so badly: where d'ya get that smiley???!!!!!

Superb....
 
Top