Why no touchy

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sammo

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So went off to the Surrey Association of Woodturners (SAW) open day / show today; and very good it was too.

The demo's were first class, and Axminster were offering a very generous discount.

Spent a bit of time looking at the various club turnings etc... and was struck by the "do not touch" signs - now obviously SAW are not the only ones to have this policy, pretty much ALL the shows etc I have been to have a similar policy - BUT as an art form turned objects BEG to be picked up and examined and handled etc - after all it's a very tactile experience...

So why the general 'no touchy' policy?

Perhaps we should welcome people to touch and feel our works - after all it's what sets the form apart...

Just a thought...

Sammo
 

sammo

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Well maybe...

But I am not convinced - as there are ways and means to make sure that someone doesn't actually pinch any of the objects.
 

andersonec

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Ever had someone who has just finished a bar of chocolate or an ice cream and then pick up one of your displays?
 

Silverbirch

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Besides unwanted fingermarks, I suppose there is also the chance of the item being dropped. The average floor surface in a public hall would be pretty unforgiving to delicate items dropped from above.
Fair enough if there is a card displayed beside the piece giving info about who made it, what timber was used, etc, but slightly annoying if the said information is safely tucked away out of sight, underneath.

Ian
 

sammo

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All good reasons - could ask people to clean their hands, you break it you bought it etc...

And there's is always that bit of magic called patina, that only comes when things are handled.

The point still (in my mind) remains, as an art form wood turnings shout 'pick me up' feel my weight, feel my warmth, feel my balance, feel how smooth I am.

Perhaps it's just me.

Sammo
Ps there are some turnings that are so delicate that a breath of wind may break, these I concede should not be picked up.
 

KimG

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I actively encourage people to pick my stuff up, as far as I am concerned it is a major factor in persuading them to buy it, if fingerprints etc are really an issue with your work, then you didn't put a good enough finish on it, as any fingerprints should be relatively easy to wipe off.

On the other hand if stuff is just for display, then perhaps I could understand such a policy, after all, in those circumstances you want the piece to look pristine as it stands without having to hover over it ready to wipe it again for the odd occasion it gets a mark.
 

Bodrighy

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I tell people to pick things up if they want to look more closely at them. Wood is tactile, at least half of it's appeal is the feel of it. I feel mildly annoyed when I see 'Do not touch' signs on displays of wood turning. All that business about finger prints or people walking off with things is not really an excuse. I have lost one little top in all the shows and fairs I have done and the only damage I have had was when I dropped something myself. Maybe if my work was worth thousands I might feel different but I think I mam a little way off that standard yet.

Pete
 

sammo

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Pete, Kim, glad it's not just me.

I just feel there is something that sets wood apart from other materials, and it's all in the touch.

Sammo
 

Jethro

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If you go to a show and things can not be picked up,fingers run around the inside of bowls,
items turned over, to look at bottoms.
How are going to be able to recognise the wood turners from the non turners ?
 

YewTube

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The displays at SAW to which Sammo is referring were competitions between members of the club and other clubs. They were not for sale but for display. The results of the competition were displayed next to the winners. What usually happens when people handle items is that they don't get put back in the same place. By the end of the day the relationship between the winners and their entry is lost.

If the items were for sale I could understand the need to handle.

Bill
 

sammo

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Hi - just to be clear I was not calling out SAW - but just using their competition as an example; I had no intention to criticise a club and what I felt was a great open day.

But for sale or not, I don't really see the difference; when displaying the results of a competition (as in this case) are the general public simply invited to "look - and coo... oh that's nice" -- as I found myself doing, but then there were more than one peice where I thought I wonder if that item is as smooth as it looks; and is it as balanced as it looks; there was also one bowl that may have been top heave (I bet it wasn't) and without the oppertunity to lift it I will never know.

Just want to round this post off by saying
WELL DONE SAW FOR A VERY GOOD OPEN DAY - it's a long round trip from Wallington and was worth it.

Sammo
 

YewTube

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Sammo

Sorry if I came over as grumpy. :(

I was trying put forward a possibility of the 'no touch' rule.

Glad you felt it was a good day, speaking as a member of the club. :D

Bill

Used the 'full editor' and not the 'quick reply', so managed to get some smiley faces :wink:
 

winemaker

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Someone picks up your pieces and drops one on there foot or on a child,baby etc you could be sued. this why you need ensurace these days #-o :evil:
 

sammo

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Not entirely sure you can be sued by someone who drops something on their own foot, sounds like one of those urban myths.
 

dj.

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The main problem with these type of stands is that the displayed pieces do not belong to the club but to the individual members. Hopefully the clubs have the items insured against damage or loss, but even if they do, if they have to claim on the insurance then future premiums will only escalate.
So unfortunately the easiest way to ensure against damage or loss is to not let the pieces be handled by the general public, on the other hand if it`s your stall with your turnings you can do as you like, as any losses are your own.


Regards.

dj
 
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