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white bloom on black table top

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RogerS

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We have a table that has developed a white bloom in a few places. I have no idea what caused it. The table itself is black (stained?) wood...the type of table that was fashionable in Habitat many years ago. Looks a bit like black contiboard but much more upmarket.

Is there anything I can put on it? I did try some black shoe polish (the type with the sponge applicator) but it had no effect ....a bit drastic ..but hey, it's quite an old table and still in good nick.

I'd like to avoid respraying the whole table top if I can :cry:
 

les chicken

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Roger
If it looks as if there is moisture under the finish like a hot cup has been put on it. Get some brown paper lay it over the area and use a warm iron and smooth over it, this will often lift the moisture out.

Les
 

Terry Smart

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I'm adding that tip to my list of suggestions for people with problems... a whole lot safer and controllable than the old fashioned method!

Thanks
 

les chicken

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Roger
Glad to be of help, it is nerve racking applying the iron Thats why I left that bit out of the post. :wink: :roll:

Terry
I feel honoured :D :D

Les
 

The Restorer

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Ah, come on Terry , it's great pouring meths over someones deeply cherished table and then lighting a match next to it :shock:
The expression on their faces :shock: just like this!
Great if it works, but experience tells you when you'll get away with it and how many attempts you'll get away with. Not an eay thing to teach.

Granny always used to use cigar ash and vinegar. The vinegar slightly dissolves the surface of the shellac finish and the cigar ash is a very fine abrasive. When rubbed you generate heat which hopefully dissolves the moisture thats trapped or the cigar ash wears away the top layer of polish and lets the moisture escape.
Ok, but you need to know when to stop or you'll have patches where you've worn through the polish.
 
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