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Which Wood to Use?

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CHJ

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Got this request from friend for a couple of bowls, well a bowl and a platter really:

".......The flat one about 10" dia and the bowl around 12" dia.
Don't know what wood you would use - something that looks similar in colour to antique pine would match the kitchen units......."


Now what do you think, pine they ain't going to be for sure; do you have any suggestions as to what might come out antique pine in colour straight off the machine or would Ash or Oak be a better choice with a little staining to darken?

If staining what spec. not used to doing much in the way of staining and am nervous of patchy finish.
 

Argee

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Cedar of Lebanon comes off the machine about that colour - time you've put on a coat of sanding sealer, you're almost there. Don't know how available it is in blanks - I got mine in a slab and cut my own blanks from it.

Ray.
 
A

Anonymous

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Chas
Ash can be a bit variable but a little experimentation should give a 'near'n'nuff'

I'd avoid Oak... too prone to chem reactions and not usually recommended where food use is a possibility. Sweet Chestnut might also be an Oak lookalike possibility


I see you've been busy pushing the boundaries again... nice work
 

CHJ

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Argee":1s280xto said:
Cedar of Lebanon comes off the machine about that colour - time you've put on a coat of sanding sealer, you're almost there. Don't know how available it is in blanks - I got mine in a slab and cut my own blanks from it.

Ray.
Thanks Ray, matching colour to surroundings would not be my choice but.., I like contrasts, better a contrast than a bad match is my preference. I'm happy with slabs, just gives me a little extra work not having a bandsaw yet. (router circles and join the dots holes I'm afraid)

We have a planned trip on woodsearch in the very near future.

oldsoke":1s280xto said:
Chas
Ash can be a bit variable but a little experimentation should give a 'near'n'nuff'

I'd avoid Oak... too prone to chem reactions and not usually recommended where food use is a possibility. Sweet Chestnut might also be an Oak lookalike possibility


I see you've been busy pushing the boundaries again... nice work
Thanks Graham Yes I have noted Ash colour differences, not two pieces have been the same so far. Saw some green Sweet Chestnut at a Malvern show recently and liking the structure had thought of getting hold of some dried stock.

Pushing boundaries... main departure was that had to start large Cherry blank with headstock rotated, managed to do refined turning with headstock back in line but packed up by 1.5mm from bed to get clearance. (happier this way as shorter rest arms are more rigid) Guess who was very careful of fingers when sanding near bottom surface.
 

La Truciolara

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CHJ":1ki5sl4g said:
.... I'm happy with slabs, just gives me a little extra work not having a bandsaw yet. (router circles and join the dots holes I'm afraid)
It is not necessary to waste time making your blanks circular prior top put them on the lathe.
It is much faster (as you do not have a band saw) to circle them directly on the lathe. Far less elbow grease.
:wink:
 

CHJ

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La Truciolara":248trwjh said:
CHJ":248trwjh said:
.... I'm happy with slabs, just gives me a little extra work not having a bandsaw yet. (router circles and join the dots holes I'm afraid)
It is not necessary to waste time making your blanks circular prior top put them on the lathe.
It is much faster (as you do not have a band saw) to circle them directly on the lathe. Far less elbow grease.
:wink:
Noted La Truciolara, I do just that with the smaller blanks but a 300mm + dia. X 100mm thick block running out of balance whilst I muscle it into some sort of order is not my idea of fun. I would much rather spend a few minutes truing it up with Router, Jig saw or Table Saw first.
 
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