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Which wood for window frames

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Giff

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I am making some window frames, just the lights not the whole frame...the frame is sound but the openings have rotted.
I was going to use Iroko, I like working with it but have had some warping ( when ripping wider boards ) in the past and have been looking at Sapele instead which I have never used. I would have liked to use Douglas fir but can't find the section I need without a lot of wastage....they need to be painted. Are these the best options ?

Thanks Geoff
 

Eric The Viking

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I ended up using Idigbo a coupe of years ago.

This caused a bit of sneering round'ere, but it was easy to work, finished well, and seems OK. It doesn't look pleasant, but as the end result will be painted that doesn't matter (It takes paint pretty well). It's a bit cheaper than Sapele and Iroko, light yellow colour. It does have short grain though and will shear across if stressed that way. The dust isn't too bad at all, compared to Iroko.

Cheers,

E.
 

Giff

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Do you just prime it Rob or treat it in some way ? The originals were redwood / softwood and have rotted. They are like a french style that open inwards.Thanks Geoff
 

ProShop

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Scandinavian redwood in 1st & 2nds quality.
Hemlock is another good choice or Douglas Fir.

use a micro porous paint or paint system.
 

Rob Platt

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all my windows when i make them are treated and with clear wood preserver then primed u/coat and glossed or treated and varnished depending on required finish
hth
all the best rob
 

Steve Maskery

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I made my French windows from Idigbo, but I'd disagree with ETV that it takes paint well - I had to buy a special (for which read expensive) primer, otherwise the paint just smeared around. I agree about the short grain though. My transom snapped towards the end of the project. Much swearing ensued. Fortunately I was able to glue it back together and when it is painted it's not seen.

But if you use good redwood, design them well against water ingress, and maintain them properly, then you should have windows that last a lifetime.
S
 

Benchwayze

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I used redwood the last time I made casements. I creosoted them first, then when that had dried properly, I applied a couple of coats of aluminium paint. Painting was a cinch after that. The guy hasn't rung back for a new casement yet, and that was some years ago.
That's not to say he hasn't had it replaced by someone else of course.. :mrgreen: Although if he does ring back now he'll have to find someone else! I'm tired... :-({|=
 

Eric The Viking

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I used aluminium primer on Idigbo. After that, acrylic primer/undercoat and IIRC acrylic gloss. It seems to be fine.

I think the aluminium primer is why it worked well. It's apparently expensive, but a little goes a long way.

Some other casements in the same window (wot I didn't make!) weren't well painted when installed about five years ago. I must paint them this season, but right now they're holding up well - no rot even though the paint is in poor condition.
 

Benchwayze

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Indeed Eric.
I first came across this use for aluminium paint, when I had to paint a previously creosoted shed.
I saw it also as a way to give softwood that bit of extra-protection, although today there are so many alternative finishes and exterior stains, it's simpler to use one of those on raw timber. They last well. But when a proper paint job is called for, I feel the creosote is an extra precaution. Maybe it's my old-fashioned, overkill outlook! :mrgreen:
 

bosshogg

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Redwood, the hospital in our town has the same windows today that were fitted when it was built 1839. They have been repaired over that time, naturally but that's good value in anyone's language...bosshogg :)

Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge?
Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?
T. S. Eliot
 

Benchwayze

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In Brum, You'd be hard pressed to find a hospital, or any other public building, (other than the Town Hall and Council House) that was built before 1939. They have a mania for knocking down and putting up ugly glass towers instead. And IMO the 'Rotunda' is still nothing more than a gigantic litter bin!
 

waveman2010

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Just a small lateral thought but can you buy double glazed glass for fitting to your shop made windows

BW Kev
 

Benchwayze

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waveman2010":1gzrmq12 said:
Just a small lateral thought but can you buy double glazed glass for fitting to your shop made windows

BW Kev
I never thought much about that, but I'd imagine you would have to design the frame and rebates to accept units. Otherwise I'd say yes.

I could be wrong though! 8)
 

bosshogg

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Oh yes, you just have to adjust the depth of the sash bars/jambs etc. to accommodate the double glaze units, or if you are working to existing windows, sometimes stepped unit have to be employed.
However you get better performance through well sealed lights to frame and sealing frame to wall, than just fitting DG units, draughts are the ultimate problem.
Empirical studies have shown that you get better performance with draught proofed windows, internal shutters and curtains, now there's food for thought...bosshogg :)

Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge?
Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?
T. S. Eliot
 

MIGNAL

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I presume in the Scandinavian countries they will be using the locally grown softwood. What do they daub their frames with and do they last?
 

bosshogg

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MIGNAL":1di7i4lw said:
I presume in the Scandinavian countries they will be using the locally grown softwood. What do they daub their frames with and do they last?
These days much of the imported Scandinavian softwood windows are finished with a micro-porous stain, white is quite common, just like ourselves they used to use paint...bosshogg :)
 

RogerS

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