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Which tools should I buy - cabinetmaking and house renovation?

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Fitzroy

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Mixed bag of thoughts.

A good set of ladders and a decent work platform. At the end of 10yrs of house renovation I think home much time I struggled up a crappy ladder.

If you’re working on a room, completely empty it first, get it finished then move on. Having lots of work fronts open across the house will make it feel like you’re living on a building site.

Get your dirty jobs done first,ripping down that lath and plaster wall to insulate will filll the house with dirt and knacker that new floor. Don’t ask! No amount of sheeting will stop the dust.
 

WoodYewToo

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I'm guessing the Domino DF500 is a biscuit jointer of sorts. I've found my biscuit jointer invaluable for making my cabinetwork and its great for reinforcing the mitres on architrave around doors and windows so they stay in line.
A second fix nail gun [and liquid nails] has also proved invaluable for fitting of skirts etc. I find the 2amp/hr batteries on my DeWalt will easily do a couple of rooms so no need for expensive and high capacity batteries.
Put aside some time for making jigs to aid with cutting in door hinges.

Colin

Hadn't thought of a nail gun.
Could be useful.
Thanks.
 

WoodYewToo

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The only critical power tool you're missing that I'd find hard to do without, is the sliding mitre saw. Lidl sell a perfectly good one for peanuts.

I Recently purchased a tracksaw and find it very useful for sheet goods and accurately cutting a B&Q door down to size. saves a lot of faffing around with fences for the circular saw. useful but not essential.

Non power tools, essentials for serious DIY include small, medium, and long levels. These can be cheap from screwfix or B&Q. i pick up Stabila ones when they're in sales or from car boots...

Safety shoes or boots. I've been very glad on several occasions to be wearing steel-capped shoes! And knee pads.

A wrecking bar or several of different sizes. A claw hammer only gets you so far...

A cheap set of Stanley chisels and both a rubber and wood mallet.

My point would be, don't spend all your money on expensive tools because materials are dam expensive and they'll be knocking about in a toolbag most days.
Thanks for the info.

Set of Stabila levels... boots... wrecking bars... cheap chisels... already onboard.
But sliding mitre saw (and maybe track saw) are rapidly moving to the top of the list for Xmas pressies from the wife.
Thanks.
 

WoodYewToo

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Mixed bag of thoughts.

A good set of ladders and a decent work platform. At the end of 10yrs of house renovation I think home much time I struggled up a crappy ladder.

If you’re working on a room, completely empty it first, get it finished then move on. Having lots of work fronts open across the house will make it feel like you’re living on a building site.

Get your dirty jobs done first,ripping down that lath and plaster wall to insulate will filll the house with dirt and knacker that new floor. Don’t ask! No amount of sheeting will stop the dust.
Thanks.
That's sound advice.
 

WoodYewToo

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dimension saw
4 sider
wide belt sander preferably 1300mm or bigger
3-4 spindles
edgebander, hot melt with 3mm edge capability
spraybooth

I've taken your advice at face value... and ordered them all.
Not quite sure how I'm going to break it to the wife... that we are now homeless - and we no longer have a property to 'do up'. But hey... the ex-neighbours are going to have some serious 'tool envy'.
:)
 

martin.pearson

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I was going to say something similar to DBT85, prioritise your projects & work through them one at a time, if you find you need new tools for that project then buy them at the time. You certainly have enough to keep you going for a while lol
Might be that some of the work can only be done or is best done at certain times of the year, sit & work out some sort of plan.
 

Woodernhift

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Lots of good advice from previous contributors. My most used tool is my bench, a split top Rubio style bench ( curtesy of Richard Maguire) it gives me many different work holding options and a solid as a rock, having your work held securely makes life so much easier.

In general get the most accurate tool you can afford, cheaper inaccurate tools cost you hours in rework and finessing the setup to get the result you need.
 
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WoodYewToo

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Lots of good advice from previous contributors. My most used tool is my bench, a split top Rubio style bench ( curtesy of Richard Maguire) it gives me many different work holding options and a solid as a rock, having your work held securely makes life so much easier.

In general get the most accurate tool you can afford, cheaper inaccurate tools cost you hours in rework and finessing the setup to get the result you need.
Well... that's an education for me!
Never heard of Roubo style benches. Wow, those Maguire made Roubo benches are things of beauty. I guess you don't need me to tell you that you should be proud to own one (they're more beautiful than any furniture I've ever owned).

Yes... I understand your point about accurate tools saving time on rework. Thanks.
 

WoodYewToo

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I was going to say something similar to DBT85, prioritise your projects & work through them one at a time, if you find you need new tools for that project then buy them at the time. You certainly have enough to keep you going for a while lol
Might be that some of the work can only be done or is best done at certain times of the year, sit & work out some sort of plan.
Good advice. Thanks.
The planning makes my head hurt - but it's essential.
 

WoodYewToo

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If it makes it any easier we moved in 5 years ago and there are still things on my list from back then 😂
I think 5 years will be a 'blink of an eye'... compared with the time necessary for my list of tasks (and my glacial progress). :)
 

againstthegrain

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I, like many others on this forum, are tempted to buy power tools... BUT you seem to be in the same position as me and have serious space limitations, so my advice would be not to have so many machines that you have no room to use them... I would love to buy more, but my workshop is already too full and I have found that actually, by the time I have jiggled around to make space for a power tool, I could have sawn that end off with my handsaw... Good luck with your ambitious programme, anyway.
 

WoodYewToo

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I, like many others on this forum, are tempted to buy power tools... BUT you seem to be in the same position as me and have serious space limitations, so my advice would be not to have so many machines that you have no room to use them... I would love to buy more, but my workshop is already too full and I have found that actually, by the time I have jiggled around to make space for a power tool, I could have sawn that end off with my handsaw... Good luck with your ambitious programme, anyway.
Good point.
That said... sometimes it's difficult to keep expenditure to 'needs' not 'wants'.
It's a constant battle. :)
 

Spectric

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Safety shoes or boots. I've been very glad on several occasions to be wearing steel-capped shoes! And knee pads.
Make sure they also have nail plates in the sole, treading on a nail hurts.

Hadn't thought of a nail gun.
An 18 gauge brad is good for trims and then a 16 gauge for heavier trim but use screws for everything else.
 

WoodYewToo

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Make sure they also have nail plates in the sole, treading on a nail hurts.


An 18 gauge brad is good for trims and then a 16 gauge for heavier trim but use screws for everything else.
Thanks, Roy.

Yes re. shoes/boots. Even my wife wears safety boots while gardening - ever since the day she pushed a garden fork through her foot!

Right... I'm away to read up on 18 gauge and 16 gauge! Thanks.
 
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