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Which shortlisted model should I buy?

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SSJS

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Hi All – I've recently discovered this forum, such a wealth of knowledge!

I am in a dilemma... I'm about to take the plunge and buy my first table saw for my woodworking projects, such as my own kitchen (!), TV stand, storage space, etc. I have a small workshop at the back of my garden in London, with the following dimensions: 3.5m x 2.9m, so not ample of space. Mobility is not as important as cutting accuracy and motor power, however it shouldn't take too much space.

Based on a number of videos and online reviews, I've shortlisted the following models:

- Makita MLT100X or 2704 (ripping 8x4s is a nice-to-have )
- Bosch GTS 10 XC
- Axminster Craft AC216TS (although it 'feels' too big for the space available...)
- DeWalt DW745

Happy to buy a more 'portable' saw and upgrade the gauge mitre if this is going to make a huge change in the accuracy of the cut as well... Also I watched quite a few videos from Germany that favour the Bosch 10 XC, with quite a few expandable tables for routers.

What are your thoughts?
 

Sideways

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It looks like you might be working with sheet materials. In that case, a decent tracksaw might do a better job than a small tablesaw. A festool TS55, a Makita or Bosch don't cost any more than a small TS but are well suited to built in furniture projects and won't take up as much space when packed away.
Watch a few of Peter Millard's 10 minute workshop videos ...
 

Marineboy

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Given the kind of work you appear to undertaking and the space you have to do it in, a track saw will suit you much better. Building a kitchen involves mostly sheet cutting which a track saw will do quickly and accurately. With the associated vacuum you can use it in the house where necessary with virtually no dust.
 

Jonathan S

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+ 1 for a track saw in your situation....I would not want to ever cut an 8x4 on a small table saw....to dangerous and no accuracy.

Sent from my SM-J530F using Tapatalk
 

sunnybob

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Fully agree with the above for big sheets. But if youre after a good table saw to cut stuff accurately and quickly on sheets 4 ft or less, and especially any hardwoods, Then I can fully recommend the dewalt 745 as I have that . =D> =D>
 

SSJS

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Thanks all for your responses. I am not inspired to get a track saw (Peter Mallard's videos/tutorials are amazing). In case I need a table saw for future use, for example: I want to shave off a few mm from a 2m pole and I don't see how I could do that with a track saw. Of course, on a table saw, with the help of a 2nd person, it seems feasible. Any cheap and good-enough table saws that you could recommend?
 

Woody2Shoes

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SSJS":34lq572p said:
Thanks all for your responses. I am not inspired to get a track saw (Peter Mallard's videos/tutorials are amazing). In case I need a table saw for future use, for example: I want to shave off a few mm from a 2m pole and I don't see how I could do that with a track saw. Of course, on a table saw, with the help of a 2nd person, it seems feasible. Any cheap and good-enough table saws that you could recommend?
I realize I'm not answering your question, but a handsaw would be just great for taking a few mm off a 2m pole.

I've done a fair bit of woodworking over many years (from making 48ft long green oak structures, to making small trinket boxes) without a table saw and personally, I wouldn't bother spending the money on one. I generally use a circular saw (with guide rail, if I want to simulate a track saw) or a disposable hardpoint saw - I also have a bandsaw, which I find invaluable. I can see that a tracksaw would be useful for repetitive precision cutting of sheet materials with a nice clean, chip-free, edge.

If I had a rush of blood to the head, the cheapest TS I'd bother with buying would be the DeWalt DW745.

Cheers, W2S
 

mynamehere

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+1 for the Dewalt 745, cracking piece of kit for a "site saw"!

Cheers!

Ferenc
 

sunnybob

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all you old time woodworkers :shock: who can slice a few mm of a long plank with a handsaw, get my ultimate respect =D> =D>
but newbies (like me) and newbies who have arthritic hands (like me) would find it easier to become the worlds strongest man. :roll:

If you dont know how to, or cant, use a handsaw, then a tablesaw is the answer. I have just used my 745 to cut up a 2 metre long x 50 mm thick plank of bubinga into several pieces. Aint many woods that are tougher than that, and i think even Arnie would struggle to do that with a handsaw, in a working day. 8) 8)
 

Woody2Shoes

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sunnybob":2yyt4l9m said:
all you old time woodworkers :shock: who can slice a few mm of a long plank with a handsaw, get my ultimate respect =D> =D>
but newbies (like me) and newbies who have arthritic hands (like me) would find it easier to become the worlds strongest man. :roll:

If you dont know how to, or cant, use a handsaw, then a tablesaw is the answer. I have just used my 745 to cut up a 2 metre long x 50 mm thick plank of bubinga into several pieces. Aint many woods that are tougher than that, and i think even Arnie would struggle to do that with a handsaw, in a working day. 8) 8)
Sorry - I'm afraid I read the OP as a few mm off the pointy end of a 2m pole (!) Taking a couple of mm off along the long dimension would be a job for a hand plane or a powered planer (or a bandsaw - or a circular saw, or a track saw with a bit of forethought - or, yes a table saw - a handsaw would be perfectly do-able but hard work).
Cheers, W2S
 
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