• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Which Sandpaper?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
Another great Woodworking class last night, managed to get all my biscuit joints cut and am now ready to clamp up!

As we are nearing the end of the class and are breaking for 3 weeks over easter (don't the kids have it easy!), the tutor has advised me to clamp up at home. He mentioned sanding down the more awkward bits and 'sharp edges'. I forgot to ask which sandpaper to use/which is best?

Would anyone like to make some suggestions? It is a mixture of Pink and White Beech.

Thanks
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
um ...


I'm looking on screwfix and they have Wet & Dry Sanding Sheets 120 grit up to 1200 grit at £2.79 a pack. Is this the stuff I need? Should I just buy a pack of each?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
1200 is a bit OTT...actually, it's a lot OTT!

I'd be inclined to get some of their al-ox (the mirka sheets), maybe 120 up to 240, then w&d up to about...oooh, 320? maybe a bit more.
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Tsk, meant to come back to this. Sorry, WiZeR. If you've got a copy of the Axminster catalogue, it has a pretty good run down of all the various types. And if you haven't, get one. It's a very handy reference as well as being extremely drool-worthy.

For bare wood you're best bet is either GCAB or "Garnet" paper, or HCAB which is a bit more flexible in that you can use it on wood, paint and metal. I use the latter, and PSF if I need a finer grit than the 240g HCAB. Seems PSF has been replaced by Axminster with SA167, but it does the same thing. The Mirka brand sheets on the Screwfix site should do you okay fwiw. Don't bother with 60g though, or maybe even 80g; almost certainly you'll never use it, but a selection of the others will see you right. Wet'n'dry clogs too quickly on bare wood and is better for metal and denibbing finishes.

Cheers, Alf
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I use the screwfix 80g for my scary sharp starting point. In practice, I personally don't go above 240 al-ox on wood, even for denibbing after sanding sealer and wax...but I know lots of people do, hence the w&d to say 320.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Best sandpaper around if 3M Sandblaster. It lasts about 3 to 5 times longer than most stuff and sands really nicely
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
does it cost 3 to 5 times as much though? lol

seriously - you do have to consider such things - the screwfix stuff doesn't last a huge amount of time, but is relatively cheap. csmjustabrasives web site here stocks better material, but the price is more - value for money is the watchword! With the 3M stuff, you're bound to be paying an amount for the brand name, and that should be taken into consideration.

[edit - i should say that my stock of screwfix abrasives is pre-mirka brand; all the al-ox i have from them is some no-name brand. Mirka is fairly well regarded, as i understand it]
 

Newbie_Neil

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2003
Messages
6,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Nottingham, England
Hi all

Tony":2fhw2iir said:
costs about twice as much but worth it :wink:
If Tony is spending twice as much it just has to be worth it. :wink:

Cheers
Neil

PS Please move over Gill, I've brought the chocolate biscuits.
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
thanks guys, it seems my knowledge of sandpaper was less than i thought.

So am I right in saying that the higher the grit the finer the finish ? or the other way round? and when you say from 120 to 240, does that mean you sand each piece of wood with 3 types of sand paper?

I can get 10 sheets of each grit Mirka for £1.79 on Screwfix and 5 sheets of each grit HCAB for £2.17


What kind of difference am I going to realise, as a amature, between the HCAB from Axminster and the Mirka from Screwfix?

Also any tips on sanding? Only thing I have ever sanded is skirting board

:?
 

Adam

Established Member
Joined
10 Sep 2003
Messages
3,768
Reaction score
0
Location
UK
Yes, the grit gets finer as the number increases. Think of it as the number of grains per inch - 240 will be smoother than 120.

I use 2 or three max types, 120, 180, and also 240 on the "bits" of a project people gravitate towards "stroking/feeling" - e.g. table tops, edges, handles etc. The gubbins underneath only ever get 180 grit.

I note people grade the project on the bit they "touch" - rather than on the joints or workmanship.

I found it most cost effective to buy in rolls - and just snip a bit off as you need it.

Adam
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
thanks, the tutor told me to sand off the sharp edges. How far should I take this? i.e make it so it visibly looks rounded or just so it feels rounded.... or is this just personal taste?



Seeing as I am ordering this on the net from either Axminster or Screwfix I might aswell buy the finishing products too. I have questions to ask but will start a new thread in the finishing Forum.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
given your requirements, the cheaper (ie screwfix) will do you...

For just general easing of the edges (which I think your instructor actually means, rather than rounding), you just sand til there's no obvious 90 degree, sharp edge - once you start, you'll see what I mean. It's a 'feel' thing, and is very obvious - a few strokes with 120 grit will sort it, then 180 to 240 to get the surface you need for the finish.

One main tip for you is to get a sanding block from somewhere - it'll save a whole load of blisters/sores/whatever on your hands! Screwfix, Axminster, and just about anywhere else sells em. The idea is, it's a semi-hard block (usually cork or rubber based) to which you attach the sandpaper - often attached via nails in the block - you don't have to worry about the attach mechanism, they're not generally hook & loop style. Alternatively, just get a block of scrap pine, and wrap the paper round it. You end up using slightly more paper using a block, but keeps your hands nice and 'fairy' soft...almost!
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Espedair Street":2jtwyrx1 said:
often attached via nails in the block
Eh? Taken as read that you don't nail the abrasive on with a couple of 6" nails, so what do you do? Nails is news to me.

Don't worry about it too much, WiZer. Yep, you can get very technical about abrasives, but it's not necessary. You'll know when/if you want/need to know more. :D Easing the edges is a bit of a personal thing really; just do what looks nice to you. As long as the sharp arris, which can actually hurt, is gone, you're fine.

Cheers, Alf

P.S. Neil, ROTFL over here :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Newbie_Neil":3lcvsbgt said:
If Tony is spending twice as much it just has to be worth it. :wink:

Cheers
Neil
.
Cheeky :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
Great advice all. Going with the screwfix stuff. Will report back how it all goes.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Alf":1nxbtaa6 said:
Espedair Street":1nxbtaa6 said:
often attached via nails in the block
Eh? Taken as read that you don't nail the abrasive on with a couple of 6" nails, so what do you do? Nails is news to me.
d'oh, no, of course not! The sanding block i have has 'nails' embedded in it, on which you impale the paper. Nails aren't, of course, on the work facing side! you kinda wrap the paper around the smooth bottom of the sanding block, and secure it by sticking it on the nails.
 

johnelliott

Established Member
Joined
16 Apr 2003
Messages
1,105
Reaction score
0
Location
Near Swindon, Wiltshire
My favourite sandpaper is actually sanding belt. It lasts lots longer than anything else I've tried. It's easy to tear in both directions to the required size. For taking off edges I use it freehand, but for flat work I fix it with double sided tape to a suitably sized sanding block.

John
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Espedair Street":2dleuggh said:
The sanding block i have has 'nails' embedded in it, on which you impale the paper. Nails aren't, of course, on the work facing side! you kinda wrap the paper around the smooth bottom of the sanding block, and secure it by sticking it on the nails.
Okay, so how d'you avoid impaling yourself on them? I'm reminded of the classic pins in the bottom of the oil stone box scenario, which has always, without fail, ended up with me bleeding and swearing. :roll: Of course I may just be a ham-fisted galoot... (don't answer that)

Cheers, Alf

P.S. Simple sanding block for them's as cares. :wink:
 

Jake

Established Member
Joined
5 Apr 2004
Messages
5,410
Reaction score
164
Location
London
The rubber one I have has a horizontal slit across the width at either end, so you can peel back the top half of the rubber for an inch or so. The nails are embedded in the bottom half pointing upwards, so they are covered by the top part normally.
 
Top