• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

which hand plane to add to the collection next?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

reck123

Established Member
Joined
9 Sep 2017
Messages
64
Reaction score
3
Location
berlin
Hi there guys

So I am basically looking for some advice on which handplane to get next.

I am heading to the dictumstore in Munich with the intent to buy a new handplane.

I already own dictums own rebate block plane with open mouth and was impressed with the feel and quality. ( from research it seems it is from the same factory as the quengsheng handplanes)

I have really enjoyed using this block plane and end up reaching for it far more often then I thought I would.

I would now like to further expand my use of hand planes and acquire another one.

I will probably choose another dictum plane as I was satisfied with the first and the premium plane makers are out of my price point.

either the dictum low angle jack plane

Screen Shot 2020-08-04 at 13.25.15.png



or the no 4 smoother
Screen Shot 2020-08-04 at 13.24.15.png



as far as I understand the low angle jack plane could perhaps do the task of the smoother and would be kore useful to me for squaring up edges flattening table tops, and flushing proud joinery.
so far I am leaning towards this.

I often already use my low angle block plane to smooth edges on work pieces so is a smoothing plane of much use to me.

Any advice on this would be greatly useful and appreciated.

Best regards,
Nick
 

Attachments

Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
Joined
14 Mar 2013
Messages
4,306
Reaction score
1,287
Location
Edinburgh
For me the most basic /fundamental bench planes to have before any others is a block plane (which you have) and either a #4 or #5. that way you are able to do anything you want. The rest are really nice to haves, rather than essential.
 

MikeK

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
9 Apr 2017
Messages
1,591
Reaction score
586
Location
Gernsheim, Germany
I bought the #62 low angle jack plane when I bought my #4 smoothing plane four years ago. The #62 has never been used and I wish I had bought the #5-1/2 jack plane with the #4.
 

Phil Pascoe

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
29 Jan 2012
Messages
20,722
Reaction score
1,282
Location
Shaft City, Mid Cornish Desert
I've never owned a low angle nor been tempted to. I have owned a nice block plane for about thirty years. I think I've used it twice. :D No two people are the same. 5 1/2 jack every time.
 

Pete Maddex

Established Member
Joined
22 Apr 2005
Messages
9,172
Reaction score
124
Location
Nottingham
Another vote for a 5 1/2 it's my go-to plane.
60 1/2, 5 1/2 and a No8 are my most used plains.

Pete
 

Bm101

Lean into the Curve
Joined
19 Aug 2015
Messages
4,181
Reaction score
568
Location
Herts.
How many opinions are there on the internet question.
Lots of people might say you don't even need a block plane. Others swear by them. I don't have a 5 1/2 . 4 1/2 I do has heft and gets through the work. If I ever bought another plane it would be a 5 1/2.
If I could only have 2 planes of those I own (and I'm Mr Amateur Hour btw) a 7 and a 5.
It's horses for courses.
I'd take the chance on an olderish stanley record rather than buy new. No need to get hung up on pre ww1 types. If you get a duffer chuck it back on ebay. For the price there is no real better alternative other than wood planes etc. Just one opinion of course.

If you think of planes as say lorries down to golf carts, they all have a use. Most people drive 4 door family cars for a reason.
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,030
Reaction score
499
Location
Bristol
I have quite a variety of planes, metal and wood, old and modern. I'm interested in exploring the differences.
But for building furniture, you need a long, fine-set try plane, a jack plane and a smoother. In terms of Stanley/Bailey planes, that's a 7, a 5 and a 4. Those are also the three planes I use most. (Except that I actually have a 5 1/2 which I like so much I haven't bothered buying a 5.)

I do have a big low angle plane like the one you showed. I'd say it works well as a bigger block plane and is good on a shooting board. It's too fiddly to change to work as a jack plane. It doesn't get used much.

With the Bailey design, you can change depth of cut half way along a board if you need to. It's a superb design, which rightly sold millions.
 

reck123

Established Member
Joined
9 Sep 2017
Messages
64
Reaction score
3
Location
berlin
Thanks for all the advice.

By the sounds of it the number 5 seems like a very well rounded plane and if I am right I can use this as a smoother and to level surfaces?

I saw that dictums quensheng plane only runs in a 5 and not a 5 and half but I assume although a little less weight and length width it will do the same job.
 

profchris

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2015
Messages
859
Reaction score
95
Location
Suffolk
I have a Quangsheng low angle Jack plane. For a month or so I loved it, and then found I rarely used it. Don't think I've bothered with it in the last two years. Looking back, it's not that good as a smoother, and not good at heavy cuts. I should probably make a shooting board forvit and confine it to that.

I suspect it's adequate at both smoothing and jack plane jobs, but no more than that. We all end up with multiple planes, and once they arrive they take over from the bevel up Jack at that specialism.
 

Vann

Established Member
Joined
15 Oct 2008
Messages
1,910
Reaction score
66
Location
Petone, New Zealand
reck123":2fsbii7p said:
...By the sounds of it the number 5 seems like a very well rounded plane and if I am right I can use this as a smoother and to level surfaces?...
A No.5 is generally used as a jack plane, and as such you'd be better getting an old beater - and saving your pennies for a new precision plane such as a smoother or jointer. Of course you can set up a No.5 as a smoother ('though I believe that's more common with a No.5 1/2).

I bought a Veritas Low Angle Jack about 20 years ago and loved it - for a while. Now I never use it because the adjuster on a Bailey/Bedrock plane is just so convenient.

Have you considered something like a new skew rabbet or a plough plane?

Cheers, Vann.
 

Andy Kev.

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
20 Aug 2013
Messages
1,364
Reaction score
118
Location
Germany
If you're going to Dictum, you might want to have a look at the Kunz Plus jack plane. They've had very good reviews in Germany.
 

reck123

Established Member
Joined
9 Sep 2017
Messages
64
Reaction score
3
Location
berlin
So would a 5 be a logical plane to get after my block plane? If I can’t acquire a 5 and a half.

To add a bit of context I own a planer jointer combo and use that often so just looking for another jags plane to compliment using power tools.

Thanks I did check out the kunz plus line but Found quite a few negative reviews
 

Woody2Shoes

Impressive Member
Joined
5 Jan 2015
Messages
1,927
Reaction score
284
Location
Sussex UK
reck123":1ltroh31 said:
So would a 5 be a logical plane to get after my block plane? If I can’t acquire a 5 and a half.

Thanks I did check out the jinx plus line but Found quite a few negative reviews
Cinderella you shall go to the ball.... You can get a Quangsheng 5 or 5 1/2 here:

https://www.workshopheaven.com/quangshe ... plane.html
https://www.workshopheaven.com/quangshe ... plane.html

I have found this supplier, and these products, exemplary (no connection other than as a satisfied customer).

I think that either would be excellent - perhaps a 5 is better if you're less physically strong (narrower blade, less material to cut through each pass) - but handplaning is a great way to build up that strength!

Your block plane is in effect a small low-angle bevel up smoother already! I agree with those above who say a Bailey pattern (bevel down) jack plane is better than a (perfectly good) bevel up low angle jack - primarily because the Bailey lateral adjustment (and cutting depth, actually) mechanism(s) are better, but also because the cap iron is an excellent way to control tear-out (I reckon it's better than an adjustable mouth which is the only alternative for LA BU planes). Another benefit of bevel down vs. low angle bevel up is that the blade on the former is easier to camber (although our 'uncle' Derek Cohen in Perth has very capably shown that a LA bevel up blade can be cambered successfully - see his website).
 

Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
Joined
14 Mar 2013
Messages
4,306
Reaction score
1,287
Location
Edinburgh
The OP is in Berlin woody2 and is wanting an instant negative cash flow v tactile asset gain satisfaction (in marketing speak) kind of thing

:lol:

As you already own power stock prep kit then the #4 as a smoother would be a more sensible option for you
 

Woody2Shoes

Impressive Member
Joined
5 Jan 2015
Messages
1,927
Reaction score
284
Location
Sussex UK
Droogs":1nx848f6 said:
The OP is in Berlin woody2 and is wanting an instant negative cash flow v tactile asset gain satisfaction (in marketing speak) kind of thing

:lol:

As you already own power stock prep kit then the #4 as a smoother would be a more sensible option for you
I know there's B**x*t and all, but I've happily bought stuff from Dieter Schmid in mainland Europe, even though I'm stuck here on this little sceptr'd island. The Euro is (I can't for the life of me guess why) pretty strong vs Sterling at the moment - the OP's tactile asset satisfaction quotient might putatively be augmented in an ameliorative fashion by a smaller-than-anticipated negative cashflow experience !? :)
 

Ttrees

Iroko loco!
Joined
18 Nov 2012
Messages
2,687
Reaction score
206
Location
In me workshop
There is a big difference in a no.5 and a no.5 1/2.
The no.5 1/2 is a handier no.6 and the most important one, whilst the no.5 plane is just a long no.4 and best at nothing.....unless you wanted to have some sort of
pedal powered mobile workshop and have multiple irons for the one plane you'd bring along. :lol:

If you are wanting to spend that kinda cash for a ductile iron Bailey, chances are you would be
miffed with yourself if you handled a no.5 1/2 after buying a no.5 plane.
The extra length and width and mass is not small, and that extra bit makes the difference for me especially when shooting thicker stock , and where a no.5 might not have sufficient width for the stock+shims you need for planing long edges.

Tom
 

Latest posts

Top