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Which Dremel

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Anonymous

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I have started doing a bit of relief carving, mainly to decorate furniture projects and I was wondering which Dremel to go for, to tidy up after the gouges esp those tricky bits between the ridges which need smoothing. There is a lithium battery Dremel on Axminster which looks useful ( http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp? ... e=1&jump=4 )for all sorts of DIY about the house as well but I wondered if it had the power to deal with Oak (my favourite timber). Does anyone have any experience of this? Should I go for a mains unit instead? My local dealer stocks Proxxon with a 12V minidrill and a mains one too: more wonderful German tools- any experiences?
I notice B&Q have started to stock quite a good range of Dremelware: I was in getting lightbulbs, honest.
 

RogerS

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Keith

I have the mains operated version (slightly earlier vintage then that in your link). It is brilliant to use. The bearing on the first one went but Bosch replaced the whole unit without any fuss or ado and I cannot recommend their after-sales service highly enough. Looking at the specs I would feel inclined to go for the mains operated one as it has the electronic feedback option.

Also, with the battery powered one, IMHO you need a second battery since a 3 hour recharge is a tad long. I have a love/hate relationship with rechargeable batteries...they do develop a memory effect (even lithium ones) and then when you need to buy a new one, they cost a fortune (if you can find one).

Then make sure you have a business visit to the USA and when there buy up as many Dremel accessories as you can...since they are much, much cheaper than 'rip-off Britain's.

Cheers

Roger
 

Gill

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Like Roger, I've got a mains version (actually, I've got two :oops: ) plus various accessories. They're lovely little tools and you can get router tables and drill stands for them - very useful for miniature work.

If you're looking to use your Dremel with a bit of finesse, might I suggest a flexible shaft to go with it http://www.glowbar.co.uk/dremel.htm ? I've used this before for glass engraving so it should suit your needs as a wood carver.

Gill
 
A

Anonymous

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Personally I think the Proxxon model is far superior.
The FBS230 is a mains version, running at 5000-20000 rpm and the build quality is excellent. The accessories such as ball and socket vacuum clamp, router base etc are built from steel and aluminium rather than made from ABS plastic so far more accurate, and the range of accessories (drills, grinders etc) are top quality, and prices seem to be well below that of the Dremel range.
Brimarc are the importers of Proxxon, (0845 330 9100) but i'm not sure if this model is still available, but there are 12volt tranformer ones of equal quality shown on their website.
I'm sure that nice Mr Brown will be along shortly to confirm!

Andy

(Martin, please make cheque payable to... :D )
 
A

Anonymous

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No personal experience of Dremels, or any similar tool, but a colleague of mine has both a battery and mains version, and slags the battery version all the time - it can't even cope with borg banana pine much of the time, let alone oak.

Just hearsay, but it's an opinion.
 

Cutting Crew

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Hello Keith,

I have a couple of Dremels on test from Bosch, both are good but I prefer the larger motor driven model with the flexy shaft. It's very comfortable to use and with a fair choice of hand pieces can be used for all manner of things.

If you get seriously into carving I also have a Powercrafter from the US, basically it's a dental drill that's been adapted for carving, woodturning etc. It has an air driven turbine that runs at 440,000 rpm and this is where for me it scores over the slower Dremel types. If you hit a tough bit of wood with the slower type the tool more often than not tends to go off line or somewhere you don't want it to, that never happens with Powercrafter due to the speed it runs at. Another good point is the cost of the bits, Dremels seem to be in the region of £2.50 upwards whereas the other uses the same drill bits as you find in the dentist, these cost about 75p each. The downside with the dental drill is the initial cost is high, you need a compressor and the noise, although quiet is so like being in the dentist's chair.

Regards....Mike
 

Martin Brown

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Thanks Andy. Sadly advertising here is verboten. I do however have a great PM story on using the Dremdful on demo.

Perhaps a copy of an independent test would be useful?

I have one for anyone interested.

Martin
 

Alf

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Roger Sinden":2m3ws7to said:
Yes ! I'll PM you with my contact details
See how eagerly he runs to his doom. :roll:

Martin Brown":2m3ws7to said:
Sadly advertising here is verboten.
Although Charley's lovely banner ads are available for rent I believe... :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 
A

Anonymous

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Sadly advertising here is verboten.
But of course, here at Good Woodworking Towers, we don't care, and our rates are so reasonable! :shock:

Andy
 

Jake

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But of course, here at G...W... Towers, we don't care, and our rates are so reasonable!
I reckon Charley should have a swear box-like arrangement for ambush marketeers like you!
 

Jake

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Oh I think you're managing to get your message across OK, aren't you?
 
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