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Whic Biscuit Jointer?

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wizer

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Hey

I am nearing the end of a woodworking project at evening class. I am making a laundry basket and have decided to fix the slats with biscuit joints. Instead of hire a biscuit jointer I thought I would look into buying one (as I will be building my own workshop later this year.) Would you guys mind looking at the following jointers I have found and tell me if there are any problems with them?

I need a good jointer which is good value for money and will last at least a few years.



Ferm Biscuit Jointer 230V
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro ... 9&ts=56499

Draper 800w Biscuit Jointer
http://www.tooled-up.com/Product.asp?PID=91511

Draper 860w Biscuit Jointer
http://www.tooled-up.com/Product.asp?PID=123036

Draper - 75303 - Biscuit Jointer 880 watt 230 volt
http://www.lawson-his.co.uk/scripts/det ... oduct=1172
 

radicalwood

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Hi WiZeR.

I have the Draper 880, its not bad but they are a pain to adjust for thickness and there is a little play in the cutter spindle. If I could go back I would have spent a little more and got the trend one. See if you can get to a shop and have a good play with one.

all the best
Neil
 

CYC

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If you are serious about woodworking and you want long lasting tools you don't have to replace every year, then I think most on this forum will agree with me in saying:
"Spend more now on the right tool and spend less later replacing a cheap product"

If you are on a budget like most of us then you need to make wise decisions on the order in which you buy woodworking tools. It of course all depends on your projects, the list will be different for everyone.

My 2 pences :p

BTW I have a B&Q pro biscuit jointer which does the job but which has a terrible fence setting, very similar to the Fern in quality I believe. Do a search for those on this forum the subject has been well discussed.
Haven't we lads and ladettes :wink:
 

wizer

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I fully understand that investing is good tools will pay off in the long run. However I can not justify spending £200 on a biscuit Jointer that won't be used much in the first year or so.

The Ferm that I listed above came from this review:

https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/review/review.php?id=26

Is is described as "AMAZING".

Is this true? or would I be buying a total lemon?
 

Neil

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Hi Wizer,

Houts was refering to the makita 3901 (from the message title)

The Ferm is great for the money IF (and its a bif IF) you get a reasonable one - the quality control must be really poor, because the difference in the reports from people who have them on here is amazing. I was one of the lucky ones, mine seems fine. I guess if you are prepared to keep sending them back until you get a good one, then go for it. Personally I wouldn't touch the Draper with a 20' pole...

You could try sending a PM to Philly - he had the Ferm and upgraded it to a Lamello in one of his famous gloats :roll: - if he didn't smash the Ferm into the workshop wall in frustration, I'm sure he would sell it to you for next to nothing...

Cheers,
Neil
 

Argee

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I absolutely agree that the most expensive thing you can buy is a cheap tool, so you need to ask yourself how much use you'll make of it in the future. If it's a "one off" deal, then it doesn't matter much. However, if you're going to be using it frequently and you want accurate, repeatable results, then budget versions simply don't do the biz.

The two most important features are the fence (ease of setting accurately, permanence of locking mechanism, stability, indent positions, free use of angles, clearly-marked indents for centre and maximum width of arc) and the motor (robust construction, accurately manuafactured, good bearings). If you want a good tool, you'll have to pay for it. Didn't mean to sound pompous, but it can be difficult to recommend a tool without knowing the long-term objectives for it.
I did an overview of plate joiners here if that helps.

Ray.
 
A

Anonymous

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WiZeR":142kv1ck said:
I fully understand that investing is good tools will pay off in the long run. However I can not justify spending £200 on a biscuit Jointer that won't be used much in the first year or so.
Then buy the Freud!! It costs just over £100 and is ten times the jointer that thwe Frem or Draper is. The cheap biscuit jointers have really poor fences and often too much runout in their bearings.

See here for a bit more on a cheap biscuit jointer experience

https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/view ... ight=cheap
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi WIZeR

WiZeR":223vck52 said:
Is this true? or would I be buying a total lemon?
What normally happens with Ferm products is the following: -

1. It arrives, joy.
2. Does it work correctly? No - go to 4.
3. Does it reallywork correctly? Yes - success.
4. Is this the fifth BJ that you've received? If so, perhaps you should look at another brand.
5. Return the BJ and wait for a replacement. Go to 1.

Cheers
Neil
 

Noel

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"The two most important features are the fence (ease of setting accurately, permanence of locking mechanism, stability, indent positions, free use of angles, clearly-marked indents for centre and maximum width of arc) and the motor (robust construction, accurately manuafactured, good bearings). If you want a good tool, you'll have to pay for it. Didn't mean to sound pompous, but it can be difficult to recommend a tool without knowing the long-term objectives for it. " = Porter Cable 557, if funds allow. So superior to that red Swiss thing (the name of which esapes me..)

Noel
 

tim

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I have the DeWalt one and rate it very highly indeed.

McLuma - I know you are a big Mafell nut and I'm all for images of stuff but can you go for lower res or smaller ones please. T those ones direct from the Mafell site take an age to download for those who live in the sticks and are not blessed with broadband (because it is not available). Thanks . :wink:

T
 

jasonB

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I,ve got the Frued one and am quite happy with it and it gets a lot of use, just the bevel gears are a bit noisy.

Jason
 

wizer

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Well thanks guys. I totaly respect your passion for this proffesion/hobby.
Your very informative and helpful posts have pursuaded me to go for the Freud JS100. Anything higher than this (DeWalt, Makita, etc) would be too overkill and pricey for me. I hadn't intended on spending this much money but from what you have all said I should get a better product and less hassle to show for it..... Wonder if the missus will accept that excuse? :?

1 x Freud JS100
100 x Biscuits No.0
100 x Biscuits No.10
100 x Biscuit No.20
1 x Goldscrews" Selection Pack Prodrive R Screws (750)

Totaled £115inc Del from screwfix
 
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