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What's your Router Plane Style

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

If you were looking to buy a new made handheld router plane, which would you most likely buy?

  • A reproduction of a Preston type router plane

  • A reproduction of a Stanley/Record type router plane

  • A new design in the style ethos of Bridge City

  • Something else, please post what below


Results are only viewable after voting.

Droogs

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I am doing a bit of research into possibly producing a hand tool router plane and would appreciate peoples view on which style of tool they prefer. Just initial research at the moment. The tool would be probably made in bronze with pretty hardwood or resin handles.
Thanks
 

Doug B

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I bought a Veritas router plane quite a few years ago, dunno if it’s based on the makes you state. 🤷‍♂️ but I’d definitely buy another if I needed to.
 

raffo

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I prefer the closed throat style. Lacking the foot on my one open throat model makes it less useful to me.
 

shed9

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Just posted on the other thread on making router planes, got me thinking that this is probably one of the few last strands of woodworking tool manufacture that small firms or even one-person setups can still make a difference.

I appreciate that Karl Hotley probably totally contradicts that statement but you get the idea.

If it were me, I'd be looking for a new design that uses off the shelf tooling from an already established vendor . Of course that dictates the design of the tool holding but it simplifies the manufacture process of the tool itself. I think the splayed handles on the Veritas are a better design in my opinion and I suspect this is based on (researched) function more than form based on how Lee Valley design their tools. I also think there is some mileage in the way the Veritas range of custom planes allows for changes of handles, frogs and blade types at point of purchase. that could be followed through to a router plane in different handles (width, height and shape) and different base plates, etc.

Any new tool manufacturer in the UK deserves all the support it can get, I wish you luck.
 

msparker

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I've recently bought a veritas. I'm sure its not a big deal, but the fact you can sharpen the 1/2" standard irons like a chisel by removing the foot sold it to me.
 

Chippymint

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I've got an old Record one which is does a splendid job. If I was to buy new it would be one that is engineered to the Records standard or better. Most I've seen and had a go with, are not good and reflect on where we are with some of the manufacturing standards of today. It does seem that you have to go to the top end to have a tool that is made to a good quality standard, does it's job well and feels nice to work with.

Having said all that, these tools have a place but rarely used as I would go for my electronic router most of the time.
 

Droogs

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just a bump to get some more people voting. The more who do the better. also i really would like comments, thoughts etc

I have a meeting with the foundry in march so would like to get a decent number of respondents.
 

Jelly

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My router plane was inherited from my great grandfather, and doesn't fit any of the above styles listed.

Effectively it's two blocks of wood carved to be easy to grip which screw together (with woodscrews) clamping the blade in place. The blade itself is little more than a broken off chisel blade which has been tidied up and sharpened to suit the angle it's held at.

There's a shallow recess carved into the front face to give you some visibility of what the blade is doing, but no holes etc.

I'm presuming it's mostly due to being used to it, but I can't imagine using any other style of router plane now, although would definitely consider a metal version (just because the use of woodscrews is a weak point which I've seen cause other old tools to fail).
 

Droogs

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The reproductions are for the #71 and the 1399P, for the modern style, think of something based around the look of a Cylon Raider from the original BSG (1978)
 

Popey

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I bought a Lie Nielsen router plane which I believe is based upon the Stanley no. 71 pattern. I'm really pleased with it.
 

Orraloon

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Mine is an old Stanley 71. I got lucky and found one with all the parts and in the original box. Couple of years later I managed to loose the screw for the fence but found a brass screw that fitted. Never really used the fence in any case. Very useful tool.
Regards
John
 

Dr W

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I have an old Record 71 and TBH I don't really see how one could improve on the design, except by the addition of a depth stop. Mine is the open-throat variety but I only ever use it with a sole plate, which makes it easy to switch between open and closed versions if that's an issue.

This might not appeal to the purists but I use 6mm polycarbonate for the sole. It's easy to machine, tough, dead flat, glides over any wood and doesn't mark the surface. Also cheap and easy to obtain (various ebay sellers offering A4 sheets in various thicknesses). I used 6mm because I had some lying about - in retrospect 8mm would have been better. Just make sure it's polycarb (aka Lexan/Makralon) - NOT Perspex/acrylic, which is brittle and nowhere near as tough. It also takes a thread really well, which makes it easy to tap a couple of holes for mounting (I use M5 button-head machine screws).
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