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What's the groove on this hinge for?

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Doug71

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I was using these butt hinges from Carlisle Brass today (as I often do), when using them I always wonder what the groove down the back is for? Is it there for a reason or just part of the manufacturing process?

The groove is the same height from the edge as the thickness of the leaf, I didn't know if it was for checking your mortise depth or setting a marking gauge or something?

Any ideas? Hope I'm not embarrassing myself here as I'm supposed to be an expert on such things :dunno:

hinge1.jpg


hinge2.jpg
 

TheUnicorn

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looks like your theory is sound, I've never noticed that myself on a hinge, so unique to that manufacturer?

would be a nice quick reference
 

TheTiddles

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I can’t see how you’d use that line to gauge, especially as it’s pretty wide.

So based on me not knowing... is it a trademarking thing? There’s a large manufacturer of press-fit fasteners that used groves in its parts to indicate them being genuine, which I can’t really see as being hard to duplicate.

Aidan
 

barfitter

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as a time served joiner carlisle brass is one of the best hardware companies there is and you are right its a depth setting for the hinge only good on new frames that haven`t had 30 yrs of paint on them .
 

TheTiddles

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as a time served joiner carlisle brass is one of the best hardware companies there is and you are right its a depth setting for the hinge only good on new frames that haven`t had 30 yrs of paint on them .
Does that leave the knuckle quite a long way out from the door/frame? I’d normally fit them closer
 

barfitter

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no that is the thicknes of the hinge plate itself its the depth of how deep to cut the hinge and as a rule you fit the hinge flush to the door leaving a that small gap to the pivot or knuckle as you call it and that gives the correct clearance from back edge of door to frame ie: the hanging side and the three pivot points go to the frame and the 2 go to the door . i was always taught the most to the post and that applies to most hinges hope that helps
 

TRITON

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The groove is the same height from the edge as the thickness of the leaf, I didn't know if it was for checking your mortise depth or setting a marking gauge or something?
why not then just use the whole hinge, laid into the cut out section. Seems a bit daft to use the edge rather than the flat or to place a mark, which seems very elaborate for what should be a precision reference mark, which bit do you mark from, theres a mill or so there to choose from.

Not the normal practice when setting in hinges 'Hmm a milll too deep, thats acceptable' :LOL:

I'd guess that its outward facing hinges and that the elaborate groove is for simple decoration :unsure:

Are there prizes ?
 

Doug71

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i was always taught the most to the post
Ha, I have never heard that but yes it's the way I fit them, although sometimes it means the writing on the hinge is upside down which just spoils the whole job 🤬

I agree it's easier to just try the hinge in for thickness so not really sure why a built in depth gauge would be needed.

There may be prizes as I have asked the question on the contact us page on Carlisle Brass website, hopefully we will get the official stance on this important matter.
 

joshvegas

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I agree it's easier to just try the hinge in for thickness so not really sure why a built in depth gauge would be needed.
Is it not easier to use that line because you will be able to see high spots. Using the whole leaf just confirm whether it wobbles or not (and the right depth obviously)
 

TheTiddles

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Is it not easier to use that line because you will be able to see high spots. Using the whole leaf just confirm whether it wobbles or not (and the right depth obviously)
Or you just use a router setting the depth by inserting the leaf between the depth stop and adjuster. I think I leaned that one a couple of decade ago and have never checked a depth since
 

Doug71

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Well Carlisle Brass found my question important enough to be worthy of a reply!


Dear Doug,

Thanks for your enquiry, the line on the back of the hinge leaf doesn't actually serve a purpose, it's just a line that's on the tooling used to manufacture the hinge.

Regards

XXXX XXXXX

Technical and Specification Support Coordinator


So there you go, officially the line has no purpose.

Since the line is the same height as the leaf thickness I guess you can use it as a guide if that works for you.

Most of my work is done in the workshop so I use The Tiddles method of leaf between depth stop and adjuster, spot on every time.
 

joshvegas

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Or you just use a router setting the depth by inserting the leaf between the depth stop and adjuster. I think I leaned that one a couple of decade ago and have never checked a depth since
I never claimed it was a good use of anyone time :D. Nor what it was for just observing it wasn't that daft.
 

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