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What's the difference between "Trade" and other paint?

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Deadeye

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Golly.
All I want is some white gloss to repaint soem window frames (wood).
I've heard of Dulux so I thought I'd go with that, but there's "Trade", "Once", "Non drip", and "Quick dry" varieties.
As I hate painting windows, I'd like something that is easy to put on without botching it, and lasts forever without chipping or yellowing. And costs nothing. And is available withina self-isolating walk of home.

I don't think 10,000 pots of Humbrol are the answer.
 

Deadeye

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Ok - so once is off the list. But there's also somehting called "Liquid Gloss", so back up to 4.

What do you swear by?
 

Steve Maskery

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My guess is that "Liquid Gloss" is oil-based. "Quick-drying" will be Acrylic water-based.

Personally I always use Johnstone's paint. Excellent stuff. Unfortunately the store is currently closed. The front of my workshop could do with a coat, it gets the sun all day long.
 

garethharvey

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Deadeye":21mndaxy said:
I'd like something that is easy to put on without botching it, and lasts forever without chipping or yellowing. And costs nothing. And is available withina self-isolating walk of home.
All modern paints will eventually break down, blister or peel. I painted a timber window with Dulux Weather Seal, within 5 years, it was all blistered and falling off. I complained to Dulux and they blamed the wood for being wet when I painted it. Which wasn't the case as the wood was actually kind dried and well suitable for painting.

I have since switched to linseed oil pain from Holkham. Have been using this for quite a few years on all external woodwork with no problems.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Dulux Weathershield? I did fascias with it and they didn't really need repainting fourteen years later when I got close the them again. I did a softwood garden gate with that's still perfect after three or four repaints in twenty six years.
 

Steve Maskery

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That's very good going Phil, can't argue with that.

Mine were done 4 years ago. It's fine high up under the overhang, but weathering a bit lower down.
 

deema

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Trade often as not is oil based, as it takes a little more skill to apply avoiding sags and drips. Everything else on your list is typically water based paint, which is easier to apply as it drys quickly.
I’m definitely not an expert, but from personal experience water based both lasts for fewer years than oil based and is a complete pig when it starts to degrade and needs repainting. It will not burn off / hot air gum off. As a consequence I avoid it like C-19!
 

Deadeye

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I need to do inside as well. Skirtings, dado rails, picture rails, doors, cupboards.

I don't mind wallpaperign, but I hate gloss painting.
 

lurker

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It is not a shop that I like, but The Range has a narrow selection of Johnson paint and they are open, I think.

I have found Lidl Aldi paints to be very good.
I hate painting, so would not profess to have any expertise.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Steve Maskery":20pn0fko said:
That's very good going Phil, can't argue with that.

Mine were done 4 years ago. It's fine high up under the overhang, but weathering a bit lower down.
Two coats of Cuprinol, aluminium primer, two weathershield undercoats and Weathershield gloss. Stainless steel screws. I got my retaliation in first. :D
 

cookiemonster

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I've got loads of external timber on and around my house - windows, soffits, fascias, doors, gates, etc. Just about everything was done (by me) when the house was built in Dulux oil-based undercoat and gloss. I have a supply but I think you can still buy it as trade gloss.

On the plus side it's easy to apply and durable (but see below). It's already yellow (actually buttermilk) so yellowing is not a problem.

On the downside is it takes ages to dry, so can be applied in dry weather only.

For me the key to keeping the external woodwork in good condition is 'little and often' i.e. keep a close eye on it and repaint the most vulnerable bits (e.g. sills) regularly. In fact what I do these days is attend to one elevation of the house every year, meaning that everything is done at least once in four years. This way each window or door takes an hour or two every so often rather than needing serious remedial work.
 

Rorschach

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I do all my outdoor stuff (wood, metal and masonry) in Zinsser All Coat exterior. It's water based but seems very tough, easy to apply, fast drying.
 

thetyreman

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jacob who is no longer on here used to swear by linseed oil paint, it's expensive though but sounds worth it, the downside is it takes an age to dry apparently, I would go with that if budget permits.
 

MikeG.

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garethharvey":3bjdl5mv said:
..........All modern paints will eventually break down, blister or peel.......
This is a massive over-simplification, but ultimately, be it 5 or five thousand years, I guess you could make that claim about any paint at all and you'd eventually be right.

I just want to add in to this thread what I have said in so many other threads: that modern water based micro-porous paints such as Bedec Multi-Surface Paint (MSP) and Barn Paint are utterly wonderful and will beat any undercoat and gloss system hands down in terms of durability. The MSP is as close as you can get with a a paintbrush to the factory applied finishes on high end timber windows (such as from Scandinavia) which will last 20 years plus before needing any attention, and even then, don't need any sanding down or scraping. Just wash, allow to dry, and re-coat. I never specify anything else, and I never use anything else myself. Wonderful stuff. (That's not to say that linseed oil paints aren't good too, but they are much more finicky to get right).
 

MikeG.

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Yes it would, but it will only last as long as the gloss adheres to the wood. Therefore if you want full benefit, get rid of the old gloss first.
 
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