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Calv

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Hi there,

Any projects i do are only on a minute scale compared to some of the daunting things i see here on the forum, just little bits and bobs for the kids. Thing is, i have hardly any space to work in, i presently live in a flat and the biggest area to work in is my kitchen. It's manageable as i've just had a new kitchen fitted with tons of worktop space available, but as you can imagine it's not ideal. The main thing i'm worrying about is the amount of sanding i do and varnishing fumes. I only do hand sanding and i guess it's not a major amount of mess, but i'm wondering if i should be aware of any long term effects of sanding dust? I do wear a mask, just one of those paper things (they any good?) and i'm going to start seeing if i can do most of my sanding outside and just paint inside.

What precautions do you lot take? (not the Durex kind before anyone starts lol.....i think i know about that by now.......i think :roll: )

Thanks...

Calv.
 

Aragorn

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I find hand sanding to be one of the most dusty ways to go. A reasonable sander attached to a vacuum or dust extractor will make less dust I reckon. Might be worth considering at some point!?

BTW, using the kitchen as a workshop? ...Priceless :lol:
 

Woodythepecker

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Calv, i agree with Aragorn, ditch the hand sanding and connect a good sander to a vacuum.

Have you ever thought of renting a garage? It might not be ideal but it would cure many of the problems you must have of working in your kitchen.

Good Luck

Woody
 

Gill

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Hi Calv

You must have a very supportive missus!

Gill
 

Adam

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Aragorn":3ojevnvv said:
BTW, using the kitchen as a workshop? ...Priceless :lol:
Don't you? I bring everything in for finishing/oiling, away from the dusty workshop!

Just like this!



:oops:

Adam
 

Aragorn

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Hi Adam - well, no I don't!
Seeing as how the kitchen is also the lounge, office and kid's playroom, I don't think TPTB would appreciate me sanding in there too. :D
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Calv

I understand where you are coming from. I use the space under the stairs and the downstairs hallway for my projects. I live in a maisonette with no garden, and nowhere to site a workshop. I have been looking for premises to rent for about a year now, but there is nothing in my area.
The local council have umpteen industrial estates, but apparently don't have anything suitable for "hobbyists." If I was investing a couple of hundred thousand pounds and employing some staff, perhaps they would show some interest.
I wouldn't worry too much about the fumes, as long as your kitchen is well ventilated. I would be more concerned about the dust penetrating food cupboards etc. B&Q are doing a random orbit sander for less than £20 at the moment. Probably not the best quality (Performance Power) but having a dust extraction attachment would help keep the dust down in your kitchen.

Taz
 

Midnight

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Calv..

perhaps plane / scrape your surfaces would make the mess more manageable?? As for finish... oil / wax rather than varnish...??
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Calv,

Been there, done that! In my last house my woodwork was done in the spare bedroom when the weather was too bad outside. Anything with mdf was definitely done outside and had to wait for the weather. Regarding dust masks, I've only got the one pair of lungs (as I'm sure you have) and would like to keep them dust-free as far as possible. I have tried different types of disposable dust masks, but always go for a P2 rating. (The rating relates to the type of dust you want to keep out). The ones I use now are 3M 8822. Have a look on 3M's website under 'Occupational Health & Safety' - 'Maintenance Free Particulate Respirators'. I get mine from arco.co.uk in a box of 10 for £26.56 but I saw them the other day singly in Homebase I think. (Assuming you're in the UK). Might sound expensive for the odd bits and bobs, but have you tried replacing lungs these days?
Regarding the varnishing - lots of open windows - until (from experience) the missus tells you off either for the smell or the cold!

Cheer,
Col.
 

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