What wood for shaker doors?

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Simon89

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Hi,

I am looking to make some shaker doors for a motorhome. Whilst weight is a consideration, finish and stability come at the top of the list.

The doors will have a painted finish.

What would be your recommendation for a good choice of wood for the stiles & rails.

The panel will likely be MRMDF or birch ply.

Thanks

Simon
 

recipio

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Assuming you have the tools to prepare rough wood then Poplar is top of the list. Light, strong and easy to mill it has virtually no grain so is ideal for painting.
 

eribaMotters

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I moved to making my kitchens out of tulip wood/poplar instead of mahogany a long time ago because of it's stability and how well it takes a painted finish [Farrow & Ball estate water based eggshell]. Whilst it is a little soft compared to beech it is a lot harder than the nice and lightweight cedar suggested earlier. Unfortunately beech is not very stable and moves a lot, something that poplar does not.
The OP mentions use in a motorhome. From 20 years experience of taking a caravan abroad the temperatures and humidity levels can be high and stability is an issue. As such I would agree with earlier suggestions of the polar with MR MDF panels.
A water based finished would also be best as it is less sensitive to fade in low light levels. It's flexibility is also better at coping with any movement around the joints.

Colin
 

DBC

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I have tulipwood cabinets in the work van for the over head cabinets and steamed beech with sapele panels for the lower ones. The van is black and gets very hot inside in summer. I can’t actually remember making them now but I would have been careful with grain selection. The tulipwood has twisted and moved a lot more than the other species. I use tulipwood all the time in customer’s houses and haven’t had problems with it but in the back of my van I reckon it could easily be 40C in there in high summer and tulipwood doesn’t seem to like it.
 

Simon89

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Thank for all the replies, I think I will go with tulipwood :)

Poplar/tulipwood - good stability, on the softer side, light weight, low grain, takes paint well
 

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