Quantcast

What wood for a cot?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

sxlalan

Established Member
Joined
21 Apr 2005
Messages
242
Reaction score
0
Location
Skipton, Yorkshire
For my first real go at woodworking I have decided to try and make a cot for my daughter who is due sometime in late summer. I have found a cot that I like in a local store that looks pretty straight forward with very little 'proper' joinery involved so I should be able to make a reasonable go of it. The bulk of the cot in question is painted, with a simple unpainted - natural wood rail around the top. Due date is still a way off so if my self-made effort doesn't work out we still have plenty of time to buy a shop effort :)

Unfortunatley I am really not sure what sort of wood to use for the job. The cots in the shop are made from pine, but it is nice, smooth stuff with few knots etc. The only pine I can find locally is full of knots and would look quite unsightly, even painted. I tried to seek advice from a local timber yard but they weren't really interrested.

Can people suggest what sort of wood would be suitable for such a project. As most of the cot may end up painted the colour etc of the wood isn't critical but I would like it to be nice and smooth and easy to work. Any advice on this, as well as tips on what to look for when buying wood, would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks

Alan
 

Shady

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2004
Messages
838
Reaction score
0
Poplar (or 'tulipwood') as the Americans call it, is a relatively cheap, uniform and easy to work wood that probably fits the bill.. Available from most timber merchants.

If you're painting over it, that's what I'd use.
 

frank

Established Member
Joined
10 Sep 2003
Messages
938
Reaction score
0
Location
cheshire
alan you could ask for red wood unsorted and make sure you sort out the ones you want, always go to the wood yard in the afternoon when they have a bit more time to see to you.if its a simple cot why not use a hard wood i would use beech it looks a nice colour and the little ankle biter wont be able to put teeth marks in it ,(famous last words )you do know your life wont be your own with two females in the house . :roll:
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
It is personal preferance, but I would also use beech. You will spend much more on a homemade, hardwood cot than if you was to buy it in the shop. However this is your (first?) child's cot and will be a family heirloom. Take your time choose a good wood and you will be suprised how proud you will be.

Of course I am not suggesting you will be more proud of the Cot than of your new born baby.... oh no :wink:
 

Gill

Established Member
Joined
3 Sep 2003
Messages
3,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Lincs
Knowing how some infants have a propensity to regurgitate, perhaps sickamore would be appropriate.

Gill (Okay, I'm off to stand in the corner... again)
 

Shady

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2004
Messages
838
Reaction score
0
Fair enough, but beech is harder than poplar, costs more, and warps if it ain't properly steamed/dried... :?

They're both characterless, straight grained woods that are a good substrate, but beech is neither 'easy' to work with, nor always stable...
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Worth a thought, but even if painted, a cot may still be gnawed.

These are definitely toxic...

beech/ blackwood/ box elder/ boxwood/ cedar/ chestnut/ citrus woods such as orange, grapefruit, lime or lemon/ cocobolo/ cypress/ ebony/ elderberry/ eucalyptus/ fir/ ginkgo/ greenheart/ hemlock/ hydrangea/ iroko/ ironwood/ juniper/ laurel/ mahogany/ maple/ mesquite/ myrtle/ oak/ obeche/ oleander/ opepe/ peroba/ ramin/ rosewood/ sandalwood/ sassafras/ satinwood/ spruce/ sumac/ teak/ walnut/ wenge/ yew.

Not a definitive list, but goes to show, that lots of woods shouldn't be eaten.

--
batty.
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
batty":q8hjzoho said:
These are definitely toxic...

beech/ blackwood/ box elder/ boxwood/ cedar/ chestnut/ citrus woods such as orange, grapefruit, lime or lemon/ cocobolo/ cypress/ ebony/ elderberry/ eucalyptus/ fir/ ginkgo/ greenheart/ hemlock/ hydrangea/ iroko/ ironwood/ juniper/ laurel/ mahogany/ maple/ mesquite/ myrtle/ oak/ obeche/ oleander/ opepe/ peroba/ ramin/ rosewood/ sandalwood/ sassafras/ satinwood/ spruce/ sumac/ teak/ walnut/ wenge/ yew.

Not a definitive list, but goes to show, that lots of woods shouldn't be eaten.
Erm... Where did this list come from, Batty? I agree some of these aren't too good, but Beech? Maple? Dunno about Eucalyptus; the parrots, who are extremely sensitive to toxins, have been gnawing it for years with no apparent ill effects. :-k

Periodically the subject of making cribs and cots appears on the Old Tools List, and the last time it did a few people made the point that the time they're in use is really pretty short. D'you really want to put all your hard work into making something which will spend a good deal of its time in the way/attic? Heirlooms are a Good Thing; but IMO something that can be used all the time makes more sense. So I certainly wouldn't waste good beech on it :wink: FWIW.

Cheers, Alf
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Alf":7pzy3b7n said:
Erm... Where did this list come from, Batty? I agree some of these aren't too good, but Beech? Maple?...
http://www.ci.tucson.az.us/arthazards/wood2.html

It's the 'sensitizers' that are a real problem — their effects are cumulative.

Of course, the same poisons in beech are also effective as disinfectants, which is why beech is better than plastic for chopping boards.

--
batty.
 

sxlalan

Established Member
Joined
21 Apr 2005
Messages
242
Reaction score
0
Location
Skipton, Yorkshire
Thanks guys. Looks like a competition between Beech and Poplar. I'm not too worried about the toxicity of beech as the site listed doesn't indicate that the toxins are in the wood but in the leaves and bark. I know I can get beech locally (I can see british hardwoods from my upstairs windows!) but don't know about Poplar. I think Arnold Laver may sell it as tulip wood but they weren't particularly helpful when I went in seeking advice yesterday. Has anyone had dealings with them? Do they provide good wood?

Thanks again

Alan
 
Top