Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

what now?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Osvaldd

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2018
Messages
449
Reaction score
0
Location
NI
I need to clean this up somehow, plane it to the line.
I was thinking of cutting the front of a no4 and turn it into a chisel plane. will it work I wonder? any other ideas?
 

Attachments

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,775
Reaction score
569
Location
Pembrokeshire
Plane as much as you can with a regular no 04 and chisel the rest to the line. Chisel planes are terrible, they just tear out and dig in constantly because there's no support in front of the cutting edge.
 

thetyreman

Established Member
Joined
4 Mar 2016
Messages
3,018
Reaction score
229
Location
North West
hand plane diagonally will remove most of the waste, skewing it diagonally will prevent tearout on the backside, clean up the part on the right with a chisel once you have flattened the majority of it up to your line. No need to modify your no4!
 

Ttrees

Iroko loco!
Joined
18 Nov 2012
Messages
2,539
Reaction score
156
Location
In me workshop
Is the grain oriented so you could use a chisel?
A big wide chisel taking shearing cuts would do it, and a huge skew might be better again.
I might make one if I need to do something that calls for it (that a router can't do)
Spring steel makes an OK chisel I've found out, probably could be improved by heat treatment
but for the odd job suffices.
A truck leaf spring might have enough meat to procure a chisel from, with plenty of grinding as they look to be around 15mm(ish) thick, if you can't obtain flat spring steel.

Keep the planes for you might need a few more.
Having a course, medium and fine plane is just not enough for me for my use.
Tom
 

woodbloke66

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2018
Messages
1,126
Reaction score
9
Location
Salisbury
Trevanion":3tuicwfh said:
Chisel planes are terrible, they just tear out and dig in constantly because there's no support in front of the cutting edge.
Sorry to be the bearer of sad tidings, but you're completely wrong :D The way to control the depth of cut is to use printer paper shims under the sole; remove one piece of paper at a time to drop the plane by it's thickness, take a cut, remove another piece of paper to drop the sole, take another shaving. When all the paper has been removed, the final cut will bring offending surface dead level with the wood the sole is bearing on. Try it and see!

Pressure is applied in the middle of the plane body and the cutter must be set so that is just kisses the surface. The cut taken is not a direct push in line with the plane, but a slicing, sideways sweep. Use it properly and it's a brilliant bit of much maligned and underrated kit - Rob
 

niagra

Established Member
Joined
2 Jul 2014
Messages
330
Reaction score
0
Location
Warwick
I'd get my drawknife out, looks like the grain is favourable.
 

Benchwayze

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2007
Messages
9,450
Reaction score
107
Location
West Muddylands
Freehand band-saw and then rasp. :)

Maybe flat spokeshave too. Definitely finish off with a wide, sharp chisel .
John :)
 

woodbloke66

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2018
Messages
1,126
Reaction score
9
Location
Salisbury
Got a router, a top bearing cutter and a wide, straight bit of wood? Cramp the wood to the line, bearing cut off the waste and use a chisel for the inside corner, placing the back against the wood as a guide. About three minutes work; dead accurate and dead easy - Rob
 

Inspector

Nyuck, Nyuck, Nyuck!
Joined
18 Jun 2006
Messages
1,923
Reaction score
263
Location
Saskatoon, SK., Canada
Ttrees is describing a slick. Once used in boatbuilding, timber framing and log building. Maybe old ones somewhere or a blacksmith making them. Lee Valley used to sell them. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.a ... at=1,41131

A buddy of mine was in Australia this past winter and he bought a chisel plane for me and gave it to me a few weeks ago. I haven't played with it yet but it looks to be well made. Below is one from a UK seller. There might be others selling it too.
https://www.rutlands.co.uk/sp+hand-tool ... delivery=y

Although a chopped up Stanley would probably work I wouldn't butcher one up unless it already had a cracked cheek. Your call though.

I would have used a rip saw to cut most of that away leaving less work to clean up. :wink:

Pete
 

MikeG.

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,177
Reaction score
678
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
Plane and chisel. Nothing special required, you could even use just a 1" chisel. If the finish is critical, then use a scraper when you finished with the plane and chisel. I'd use a chisel as a scraper.
 

Osvaldd

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2018
Messages
449
Reaction score
0
Location
NI
Thanks fellas, don't know why I though this was complicated. I guess because I never planed to a stop before. But it was easy enough with a hand plane and a chisel. Also learned something new - a slick , never heard of it.
 

Attachments

Benchwayze

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2007
Messages
9,450
Reaction score
107
Location
West Muddylands
Osvaldd":36sav3fr said:
Thanks fellas, don't know why I though this was complicated. I guess because I never planed to a stop before. But it was easy enough with a hand plane and a chisel. Also learned something new - a slick , never heard of it.
I can't photograph mine 'cos it's at home and I am here! But it's just a Daddy-Bear size chisel, usually of the socket variety.

John (hammer)
 

Latest posts

Top