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What kind of wax on plane soles?

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JesseM

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I recently watched that Rob Cosman video and saw him squirting wax on the soles of his planes. This seems like a much easier way than the way I have been doing it, which is to apply the wax, wait for it to dry, wax off. I like the idea of just being able to squirt some on, but was unsure of what type of (liquid?) wax to use.

Thanks for any advice
 

SVB

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I'm no hand plane expert but I am sure I have see the LN folks et al at shows use a stick wax. I assumed it was simple candle or bees wax but would bow to the weight of experience that is on this board.

Simon.
 

Chris Knight

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Most waxes will work just fine. Candles are easy to use although I prefer paste wax on the whole. Beeswax is harder than some people prefer, the Liberon liquid wax is softer than other folk like. At the end of the day, whatever suits your way of working is just fine. The old trick:- oil in a purpose-made container stuffed with a suitable wick is liked by many - it is very easy to wipe the sole of your plane across the wick as you draw the plane back off the work for another stroke.

Since you plane the stuff off the wood more or less immediately, there isn't really a problem with finishes being upset by the oil/wax. The important quality is the degree of lubrication and hence friction reduction that is provided - I reckon it is typically some 80% for an iron plane. And, reducing the friction this much really helps you feel how the iron is cutting.
 

JesseM

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Newbie_Neil":287ie07o said:
Hi JesseM
Welcome to the forum.

Cheers
Neil
Thanks!

Thanks waterhead. I had read somewhere about silicon based waxes creating fisheyes (not sure what those are but I assume they are bad), so I was curious what would be better. BTW I have been using clear paste wax. It doesn't last very long at all so I might just try some of the car waxes I have. I know some of them have carnuba in them.
 

ydb1md

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JesseM":1hpfk2es said:
Newbie_Neil":1hpfk2es said:
Hi JesseM
Welcome to the forum.

Cheers
Neil
Thanks!

Thanks waterhead. I had read somewhere about silicon based waxes creating fisheyes (not sure what those are but I assume they are bad), so I was curious what would be better. BTW I have been using clear paste wax. It doesn't last very long at all so I might just try some of the car waxes I have. I know some of them have carnuba in them.
You read about the fisheyes in this month's Popular Woodworking.

I use beeswax.
 

Jarviser

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I just draw a zig-zag down the sole using a simple candle. Takes 3 seconds.
Some also stick carpet to a piece of board, rub some oil in, and "park" the plane on it when checking for square etc. I don't find oil very slippery though.
 

Chris Knight

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I wouldn't use a silicon for the reason mentioned even though you might get away with it OK. My remark about finishes was really with the idea of paraffin or natural waxes and mineral oils in mind.

Carnauba is a very hard wax and there is really no need to try and seek out a long lasting wax - just a few swipes with the candle or a cloth with wax on it is all you need. A hard waxed sole will wear off pretty soon anyway when planing.
 

Brent

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I use parrafin wax, just zig zag it over the sole and you're ready to go. You can buy it at any grocery store, they sell it for canning.

Brent
 

engineer one

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dc showed me his box at toolshow 2005, it is a pad in a metal box which he soaks in camellia oil and wipes the sole over on a regular basis, seems to work too.

the thing about silicon is that it causes crazing in some finishes.
which is why many people make sure that their clients do not
use silicon polishes when waxing furniture, it can react with the
established finish.

when i used to paint model cars, silicon in the air would make the
paint go really strange, it seems to set up a kind of droplet.
maybe it would be good to use for producing a distressed finish.
paul :)
 

Jarviser

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engineer one":lcdxhmts said:
when i used to paint model cars, silicon in the air would make the
paint go really strange, it seems to set up a kind of droplet.
maybe it would be good to use for producing a distressed finish.
paul :)
I was told in no uncertain terms by a paint laboratory manager in a certain major motor manufacturer not far from here (when I asked him to spray a control box with Hammerite) that it's silicone that makes the hammer finish, and that he would never be able to get the (******) stuff out of the atmosphere for weeks.
 

Alf

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Jarviser":1x4dm6yj said:
I just draw a zig-zag down the sole using a simple candle. Takes 3 seconds.
Sheesh, what's holding you up? :wink: :lol:

Welcome to the forum, JesseM. Somewhere or other in the archives I think there's a previous discussion on waxing and people's preferences... yep, here we are.

Cheers, Alf

Who come December will starting writing "Xmas" and "Yule" on her plane soles as a festive alternative to the squiggle. :deer
 

JesseM

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Alf":3pcp7cap said:
Jarviser":3pcp7cap said:
I just draw a zig-zag down the sole using a simple candle. Takes 3 seconds.
Sheesh, what's holding you up? :wink: :lol:

Welcome to the forum, JesseM. Somewhere or other in the archives I think there's a previous discussion on waxing and people's preferences... yep, here we are.

Cheers, Alf

Who come December will starting writing "Xmas" and "Yule" on her plane soles as a festive alternative to the squiggle. :deer
Thanks. I did a brief search but I didn't turn this up.
 
A

Anonymous

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zig-zag witha candle here too (1 second :wink: ). Tried bees wax and liguid waxes but candle suits me best
 
A

Anonymous

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I used to use candle wax and still would but my was must have gotten thrown out with a stack of shavings.

Lately I have been experimenting with paste wax and raw linseed oil. Think I may have to build a container for the raw linseed oil as I like it allot.

Candle wax, paste wax and linseed oil all do a great job when it comes to sole lubrication. Youc can't go wrong with using them, Just make sure you hold on tight to that tote :D

Dan Clermont
 

ByronBlack

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Holding on is good advice, for the first time I used candle wax, I virtually covered the entire sole not thinking it would that good, went to give it some welly (this was a scrub plane) and threw the plane halfway across the workshop ;-) luckily the plane was wood and just bounced!
 

Shady

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Yup - candles and a 'scribble' for me, too. Feels good and ecologically friendly. Don't use silicone based products - sure, you'll plane it off the working surface, but tiny traces will get onto: the plane handles, blades, other bits of the work as you move it, etc, etc, etc. This does indeed then risk 'fisheyes' and worse - which are basically 'bubbles' in your finish. DOn't confuse this with the 'anti-rust' waxing - I use liberon for that, and soak it into the metal.
 
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