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foxhunter

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Any idea what this is intended for? It is marked Sorby. There are signs of impact on the handle and the round tapered blade has some pitting.
This is one of four in a collection of old tools bought recently at an auction.
 

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Sgian Dubh

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It looks like it's probably a boring awl, although it might be a scratch awl. Slainte.
 

Cheshirechappie

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I'll have a stab (!) at it being a drawbore pin. Often craftsmen use pairs of them, and may own several pairs. Used when assembling pinned mortice and tenon joints to draw the holes into line ready to knock the wooden pin through.

It looks too long and too heavily built to be a scratch awl.
 

AndyT

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+1 for what CC said.

There seem to be two approaches to drawbore pins. The cabinetmaker's version (like this) has a nice handle and is presumably intended to be forced in and out by hand pressure alone.
The carpenter's version is all steel, with a sneck at the end, so it can be hammered in place, and also be withdrawn by hammering.

I think your one may have been used by a carpenter!
 

Tom K

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In truth a simple tool with dozens of uses dependent on size variation. Same basic design though bit like the humble chisel eh!
 

foxhunter

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Thanks folks. One for the bay or just to look at from time to time eh! Somehow I can't imagine me actually using it.

Brian
 

Chrispy

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How hard is the steel? is it very hard? because it looks like a scraper burnisher to me.
 

Pete Maddex

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Hi,

I am sure I have seen something like it used in sail making, to pin the cloth to the floor while they lay it out.
I would explain the signs of impact.

Pete
 

Chrispy

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Try it to turn a burr see if it works, in my book if it does then it is.
 

twothumbs

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How about an Awl for leather or book binding, or for cloth belting, or as a marlin spike....ie making holes for stitching or putting thread, string through another material.
 

foxhunter

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How about an Awl for leather or book binding, or for cloth belting, or as a marlin spike....ie making holes for stitching or putting thread, string through another material.
No sharp point at the end I'm afraid. Nor any sign that there ever was one.
 

Cheshirechappie

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foxhunter":2krkb0fk said:
How about an Awl for leather or book binding, or for cloth belting, or as a marlin spike....ie making holes for stitching or putting thread, string through another material.
No sharp point at the end I'm afraid. Nor any sign that there ever was one.

Seems to point even more towards drawbore pin.

By the way, if you do decide to Ebay them, make sure you present them in pairs of the same size (especially if the handles match). That will attract a much better price for them.
 

Tinbasher

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Looks like a Podger which is a metalworkers version of the Drawbore Pin. Used for aligning holes in plate whilst riveting, its posher than most though.
 
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