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what is the quietest router on the market

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Anonymous

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hi everyone i wonder if anyone can help me i want to buy a 1/2 1850w or + and want to buy the quietest one there is as sometimes the noise of the router combined with the vibration of the router table can go through you at times :x
cheers
Rich
 

Adam

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Well I can certainly recommend a Mafell LO50E as the quietest router I have ever heard. They are made in the same factory as the Festool - so you may wish to consider them if you have a really deep pocket. I have an age old review from either F&CM or GWW (can't remember) and they noted it's very low noise. It also has no vibration, and is the first router I have ever used to be so well balanced. It seems to have plenty of grunt, and the "pistol" grip makes it much easier to do freehand, or fence work, although it's not so much benefit in a table.

Adam

PS: So far, I've used DeWalt, Bosch, Makita, Trend and a few others, and they are not a stitch. I can easily use the Mafell without ear defenders, which is not something I would normally consider.
 

Chris Knight

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Rich,
A couple of USA links here - not hugely relevant but worth a glance
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/f....taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/w00047.asp[/url]

I haven't tried as many routers as Adam but have no difficulty believing that the Germans got it right having fallen in love with Festool power tools.

Don't forget that the noise from a router will come from several sources and probably the noisiest is the cutting operation itself, especially with blunt bits. A router table will act to a degree like a sounding box, so attention to these areas will make any router sound quieter in use.

I always use ear defenders when routing. I think a pair of these will allow you to choose a router on other grounds that may be more relevant to the routing operation per se.
 

sawdustalley

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Rich, you might be better off spending £10-20 on a decent pair of ear defenders.

Its amazing how good they can be, IMO they actually help me to concentrate more.

Your motor may be a quiet one, but remember - when metal hits wood - its a whole differnet story.

If its just an excuse to get a decent router, I like the Makita 3612CX :p
 

Dewy

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I was going to suggest that the quietest router was the one that came with earplugs. A couple of bits of cotton wool work wonders. ;)
 

Adam

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Actually, I think quietness is indicative of both the quality of grinding, on the main shaft, the quality of bearings, and the general machine tolerances on the chuck etc. Good quality = quiet. I think lack of vibration goes a long way towards really smooth finish straight off the cutters.

Based on this, Festool or the Festool in disguise (i.e. Mafell) get the prize for me - you only have to look at the rest of their products/number of recommendations to see they are truly putting quality and design as thier #1 priorities. You might find they weigh heavy on the credit card though :shock:

Adam
 

Pete W

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waterhead37":16j7lb9t said:
I always use ear defenders when routing. I think a pair of these will allow you to choose a router on other grounds that may be more relevant to the routing operation per se.
I know that works for many, but it isn't a complete solution to the problem of workshop noise. Those of us with workshops attached to the house, with near neighbours, in otherwise-quiet residential neighbourhoods can't go round issuing ear defenders to all and sundry.

I'll get off my soapbox now :).
 

Big John

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I've got the Festool 1010, which is only a 1/4", but is very quiet and has little vibration. Miles quieter than my DW625.
John.
 
A

Anonymous

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Rich

I purchased my Porter Cable 2HP router for exactly this reason.

In all magazine tests I read whilst trying to decide on a router it always came out as the quietest on test.

Charley has the same one and would probably onfirm that it iis pretty good for a router.

However, a lot of noise will be gnereated by the cutting action of the bit

Hope this is useful

Tony
 
A

Anonymous

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This low-noise issue is important.

I am retired now so get plenty of time to indulge this wonderful pastime.:)

However, because of the high noise level of some of my machines I will very rarely use them @ weekends, mindful that some of my neighbours work long hours in the week they deserve a bit of piece @ the weekend, which invariably they get here, ( the back of beyond) as its probably the reason they moved here originally.

Quiter machines get my vote everytime
 
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Anonymous

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its just that norms routers seem so very quiet and sweet
 

Gary H

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Still trying to get the 'woodshack' watertight in
Hmmm, that may be the skills of a sound editor at work ie. isolating noise and sounds so that the presenter, in this case 'His Norm-ness', can be heard.
Although I'm sure someone here who owns a Porter Cable may be able to advise otherwise...

Ta muchly

Gary
 
A

Anonymous

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Checking in the specification box showing weight, price, speeds, noise etc in our last group test of Pro routers (a while back, so maybe one for the near future...)
The Porter Cable 7529 was the quietest at 91Db, but it's only 1300watts and the plunge stroke of 43mm limits it use. (again in the spec box)
The Makita 3612C at 1850 watts is 95Db, the nearest to that is the Trend T9, 1800watts and 96db.
The DeWalt DW625, one of my favourite machines is 1850 watt (now upgraded to 2000w iirc) and 101db.

cheers,

Andy
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Adam,

Interestingly,
Well I can certainly recommend a Mafell LO50E as the quietest router I have ever heard.
actually is one of the noisiest at 104db.
This is based on how I take all of my readings for test purposes so that I have a consistency throughout, issue by issue.
I use a hand held decibel meter which is placed on a surface 1000mm away from the tool being tested before the power switch is operated.

Mind you, I do get what I consider unusual readings sometimes, where a sweet sounding machine is noisier than a whining one.
I'm no scientist, but I think decibels readings measure sound pressure the same way as your eardrum works, picking up deflection of the eardrum, or in this case, a diagphram in the reading spike on the meter caused by the sound wave so this may be it.
No doubt someone on this site can enlighten us all to the workings of the human ear, and indeed how decibel readings are interpreted!

Andy
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi again Adam,

Just reading through the thread again, the LO50E is a 900watt machine and is indeed quiet at 82decibels.
I was referring of course to the 1/2in collet LO65E, a beast of twice the power at 1800watts and a somewhat different kettle of lobsters!! :D
Apologies for any confusion!
cheers
Andy
 

Adam

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Blimey, you had me worried there, but then I remembed that it is quiet compared to others I've used, and was going to think of excuses such as a dodgy bearing or something.

The one thing I'd like to hear is a side to side with the Festool, to see if their is any noticable difference.

Adam
 
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