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what is that different reflection?

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GEPPETTO

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Hi All,

Time ago, I bought a Stanley #5, made in USA and with SW blade (1910 dated). Yesterday, when I was sharpening it I seen that the bevel surface was dividing in two parts , in sense that the bevel reflected in a different way under the light.
It was like if the blade would be achieved with two layers of steel. Is it possible the blade is achieved with two different types of steel?
 

GEPPETTO

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Hi ike,

and why it is? I I have read in Japan they achieved chisels with two types of steel. But it was hammered in bit of the tool only not along all the length.
 

Alf

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GEPPETTO":2hp3p1us said:
Is it possible the blade is achieved with two different types of steel?
Yep, sounds like a laminated blade. The Old Tools List archive is unavailable at the moment or I'd see if I could find you some more information. It was done because of costs I imagine. Cheaper to use the labour to laminate a piece of tool steel onto a cheaper backing than make the whole thing from tool steel.

Cheers, Alf
 

ike

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and why it is?
I agree with Alf why it is done for plane blades. But I think it is done for chisels for a different reason. It is to give a combination of strength (the softer backing steel) and extreme hardness for edge retention. (but never lever Japanese chisels as the cutting edge will break)

cheers

Ike
 

GEPPETTO

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... and I thought to have a blade of a certain importance.... it is a cheaper blade only.. :(

however, thanks for informations.
 

Chris Knight

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Cheer up Gabriele, it does at least indicate you have an older blade because that forge welding is not done nowadays. Older blades are not necessarily better than new ones but they often are, so you have in all likelihood, a good blade.
 

Frank D.

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Geppetto,
You do have a blade of importance! The laminated blades were some of Stanley's best, much better than the solid post-war cheapos. The laminated ones are the only ones I don't automatically throw into my scrap metal bin.
 

GEPPETTO

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.. and if the blade is among the Stanley's best what do I must think about the cast?? Perhaps I have got a "good" Stanley handplane.
:D :D :D
 

Frank D.

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I forget the exact types since I'm not really a collector but if I'm not mistaken you have a type 11 (dated 1910), my favorite type! Best combination of modern features and quality machining, nice solid bed (the kind with no ridges) and very nice castings. The handles are probably real rosewood. Very nice plane.
 

Alf

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Sorry, Gabriele, didn't mean you to get the idea it wasn't any good! :oops:

Anyway, the Archive is available again, so some more information here.

Cheers, Alf
 
A

Anonymous

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These laminated blades are very good, especially for someone gettting started in woodworking because they are easy to sharpen and take a keen edge. The edge will last a reasonble time in North American hardwoods such as oak, maple and walnut. Enjoy your fine old blade!
 
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