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cd

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Hi,

I've been given some old saws by my father inlaw they apparently belonged to his father so I'm guessing they should be at least 50 years old. they've not been used for about 40 years and so I'm wondering whats what and if there worth cleaning up sharpening etc.


click on image for larger view

If it helps my only experience of handsaws so far is the hardpoint type from b&q, so if I can do something would these and make them usable it would be nice introduction to better handtools.

cd
 

Alf

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I think, after 100+ views, we can safely say we don't know. :lol: A few close up shots of the handles and such might help, but then again, maybe not. The second from the bottom appears to be the oldest at a guess; look like split nuts to me. The top one is a pruning saw; does it have teeth on both edges by any chance? The medallion on the second from top might tell us something, even if it's only Warrented Superior. Your best bet to clean them, in my experience, is laying the blade firmly on a flat surface, and take some wet 'n' dry wrapped round a block of wood, lubricated with white spirit, and rub up and down the length of the blade. If you're lucky you might even reveal an etch. If you do, we might be able to tell some more. Certainly worth cleaning up, sharpening and putting to work IMO. Have you seen the price of non-hardpoint saws these days? :shock:

Cheers, Alf
 

cd

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thanks Alf,

I'll have a go at cleaning one and see how I get on.
Most of them have slightly loose handles would I be better to take them off to clean or just tighten them up and leave them on ?

The top one is a pruning saw; does it have teeth on both edges by any chance?
Yes, looks a bit odd really never seen a saw like it before :shock:

look like split nuts to me
Sounds painful :lol: What does it mean ?

cd
 

Alf

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cd":3pceywfb said:
thanks Alf,

I'll have a go at cleaning one and see how I get on.
Most of them have slightly loose handles would I be better to take them off to clean or just tighten them up and leave them on ?
If they will tighten up, then by all means do so. Be careful on the older one if they are split nuts, 'cos it's very easy to strip the threads and then you're in the soup. Best not to remove them if you can avoid it, 'cos you'll probably never get them back "right" again. The other ones should be fine, unless they're the false bolt, rivet type, and then you're stuffed. :(

cd":3pceywfb said:
The top one is a pruning saw; does it have teeth on both edges by any chance?
Yes, looks a bit odd really never seen a saw like it before :shock:
According to Salaman it's a double edged, or "Duplex" pruning saw with peg teeth on one side and coarse M teeth on the other. Used for removing dead lower branches, pruning fruit trees etc.

cd":3pceywfb said:
look like split nuts to me
Sounds painful :lol: What does it mean ?
Ah yes, haven't heard that one for, ooo, two or three days... :p :lol: If you look on the back, you should see that the end of the bolt comes right through the middle of the nut, through the centre of the slot for the screwdriver. You need a special screwdriver or screwdriver bit to tighten them, and 'cos they're very soft it's very, very easy to muck them up. If you can avoid doing anything to them at all, so much the better. If that's clear as mud I can find you a picture, but not just now 'cos I'm in a tearing hurry. :roll:

Cheers, Alf
 
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