Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Welders

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Max Power

Established Member
Joined
26 Mar 2007
Messages
1,771
Reaction score
12
Location
County Durham
What type of welder would be best for welding the ends of the tyres on wooden cart wheels together?
I use two types one is solid steel about 45 x 12 mm , the other is a C shaped section of about 2.5mm thickness, which is designed to hold a solid rubber tyre onto the wheell.

Ive never welded, so easy to use would be good
 

Lowlife

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2011
Messages
232
Reaction score
0
Location
Shepperton, England
Do they definitely need to be welded, would brazing do? If so then all you need is a decent propane torch. I used this method to make a steel tyre for a wheelbarrow, I ground a taper on each end of the steel strip and overlapped them, it's lasted years, although it is only a wheelbarrow!

Can't really comment on Migs as they appeared some time after I learnt to weld and I've never used one, only arc and oxy acetylene, the latter is what I personally would use if they had to be welded, but it's expensive to set up, apart from buying the welding torch etc... you have to rent the cylinders.
 

Lowlife

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2011
Messages
232
Reaction score
0
Location
Shepperton, England
That's true, I remember seeing it done on some history program a while back, that would be quite easy to do.
 

No skills

Established Member
Joined
6 Feb 2011
Messages
2,557
Reaction score
1
Location
Hanging by my fingertips
MIG is certainly easier imo, you would need something with a fair few amps to get good weld penetration on 12mm thick steel tho (even given proper preparation of the two bits being joined). Would be tempted to mig the channel one and arc the solid one.

JMO
 

Richard T

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2009
Messages
1,743
Reaction score
0
Location
Wet Midlands
Yup. Feathered down, punched, lapped and hot riveted. Though cold riveting would work with drilling substituting the punching..
Something I've not yet done myself but would love to have a go at some point.
 

barkwindjammer

Established Member
Joined
2 Jan 2010
Messages
983
Reaction score
0
Location
Central Alba
Hire a 30 Amp stick welder from a local hire shop, most novices draw a stick away from a weld, the trick is driving 'through the pool', the thinner C section you could weld too, match the rod to steel thickness or slightly below, say a 10mm trode for 12mm, or cold rivet a 'fishplate' across the join
 

chunkolini

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2007
Messages
357
Reaction score
0
Location
herefordshire
You could Mig weld both of them, if you grind both edges of the thicker one to an 45 degree angle and weld over it in several passes it would be straightforward to do but you would need at least a 150amp welder for the job.
It would probably be easier to get the job done by a welder, if you do all the prep yourself it is only a few minutes work for them.
Of all the welding techniques I would say that Mig is the most versatile, I do loads of it.
if you have other uses for a welder it would be a good excuse to buy one.
Avoid buying SIP welders, they have a universal reputation for being very poor.
if you want to browse the werid worls of welding here is an excellent forum http://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/index.php it covers a whole range of metal bothering, from cars tosculpture to all sorts. Some very experienced people on there.
 

Latest posts

Top