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Waterstone advice

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chippymart

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Hi guys,
Just brought myself my first japanese waterstone and have used it and it came in a plastic box and want to know if I should allow to dry out before i put back in box with the lid on so not to sweat.
Any advice would be appreciated.
 

Kalimna

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Im pretty sure that the stone will last longer if allowed to dry out prior to being stored away. There are some stones that are positively damaged by being kept wet, but this, obviously, may not apply to yours.
At any rate, if it is stored damp, then mould might grow on it, which I can't imagine is a good thing!

Adam
 

woodbrains

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Hello,

It doesn't really matter. Many water stones can live happily submerged anyway. The fine ones (I'm assuming this is the sort you have) don't need to be kept wet, but it doesn't harm them if they are a bit damp. Just wash and dab the excess water away when you store. It is probably better to put the lid on the box for protection from wood dust caking and possible knocks during the time it takes to dry out.

Mike.
 

Kalimna

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Mike - in some situations it does matter. Some stones, as you say, are fine if kept submerged in water, but some will crumble away if this is allowed to happen. But there is a difference between submerging and merely damp. If damp, then mould will grow eventually - I know this :) Also, and whilst not an issue at this time of year, if the damp stones are kept somewhere they might freeze (in an unheated shed, say) then any freezing action can fracture the bond between abrasive particles.
For a little more info on why storing damp/in water is not always a good idea :

http://www.fine-tools.com/naniwa-chosera.html
http://www.fine-tools.com/G-shapton.html

Cheers,
Adam
 

Phil Pascoe

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I seem to remember the advice on mine was to keep them in water - mine are o.k. still in water after 20+ years.

Phil.

Edit - I think the advice was not to leave them immersed in hard water areas, because the salts would clog them.
 

bugbear

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phil.p":29bv67ps said:
I seem to remember the advice on mine was to keep them in water - mine are o.k. still in water after 20+ years.

Phil.

Edit - I think the advice was not to leave them immersed in hard water areas, because the salts would clog them.
It varies from stone to stone, I'm afraid to say.

BugBear
 

Benchwayze

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woodbrains":2qdld2e1 said:
Hello,

It doesn't really matter. Many water stones can live happily submerged anyway. The fine ones (I'm assuming this is the sort you have) don't need to be kept wet, but it doesn't harm them if they are a bit damp. Just wash and dab the excess water away when you store. It is probably better to put the lid on the box for protection from wood dust caking and possible knocks during the time it takes to dry out.

Mike.
Similar to the above.

My finest grit polishing-stone isn't kept wet at all; the only time water comes near it is when I use it, and then it's mostly slurry.

The coarser stone lives in a plastic biscuit box and is permanently submerged in water. After use, I run it under the tap, and give it a light scrub with a suede brush. When I flatten it, I do it dry on an old sanding belt, stuck down to a piece of 25mm melamine faced MDF.
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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Here is my current storage system, which are used for Sigma waterstones.

I have a 1200/13000 combination stone. This was a gift from Stu otherwise I would have opted for separates. The 1200 needs to be soaked, while the 13000 only needs a sprinkle (although Stu says soak it as well). T

The other stones are a 6000 and a 10000 which, similarly, could be sprinkled, but are best with a short soaking (which prefer since this keeps them ready for use.

How do you soak one side and not the other? Well the anser gave me an idea how to soak all the stones and keep them gunge-free.

I use separate plastic containers, into which I place a coil of tubing. This will keep the stone off the bottom of the container (where the gunge lives) ..



The clips are marked with the grit for easy reference ..



Here is a picture with the three stones waiting use ...



And another with the lids on to keep out dust ...



The other side of the sink is a sideboard where I use the stones.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

woodbloke

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On the other hand, this:



..is how the locals in Takayama, Japan do the sharpening stuff. The chisels were well used and were lethally sharp. A bucket and the floor is the way forward! - Rob
 

Mark A

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woodbloke":1nxnljd9 said:
A bucket and the floor is the way forward! - Rob
I use a washing up bowl filled up from the hosepipe and placed on the decking - would that make me a traditionalist then? :D
 

jimi43

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I actually soaked my newly acquired Belgian Coticule in a large water bath today....



It is actually "ALFIE TOWERS"...his new water park....and of course...filled by the bucket load not a hosepipe! :mrgreen:

Jim
 

Sawyer

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I only use one of coarser double-sided ones, which I keep submerged. Otherwise, any water sprinkled on is immediately absorbed and the surface remains dry - which appears to be missing the point with waterstones?

Don't know about the finer stones though.
 

Harbo

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Rob - the group of 3 look to have been ground away unless they are specials?
Bring any goodies back?

Rod
 

woodbloke

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Harbo":t6pl9l8u said:
Rob - the group of 3 look to have been ground away unless they are specials?
Bring any goodies back?

Rod
Not ground Rod, but continuously honed. Goodies...kitchen knives from Aritsugu and Masamoto and a few other bits and pieces :mrgreen: :oops: - Rob
 

woodbloke

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...but I got my two Masamoto's at a muchly reduced price as they were in a sale. The Deba I had to pay the full whack for :( - Rob
 

Kalimna

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I have recently placed an order for one of the smaller knives in this range http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SPECIALS.html#Saji Urushi&Makie (about halfway down the rather large page, under "Japanese Traditional "Urushi & Makie" Series"). I have been doing a lot of extra locum work and thought I would treat myelf. Gotta wait 3 months though for it to be made though :(

And those Murray Carter knives look rather nice too - from an earlier posted link.....

Cheers,
Adam
 

Pete Maddex

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woodbloke":20p3wae4 said:
Harbo":20p3wae4 said:
Rob - the group of 3 look to have been ground away unless they are specials?
Bring any goodies back?

Rod
Not ground Rod, but continuously honed. Goodies...kitchen knives from Aritsugu and Masamoto and a few other bits and pieces :mrgreen: :oops: - Rob
Good to see they charge those left handers more :shock:

Pete
 
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