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Wardrobe back panel fixing - hidden fixings?

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Bill Derr

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I have a job to make some wardrobes for a client, they want a wardrobe either side of the bed with a bridging unit of cupboards over the bed and between the two wardrobes.

The material will be MFC (most likely) or similar pre-finished board and back panels are required.

What would be my best options for fixing the back panels to the side panels where the side panels will be fully seen on the external face as just screwing through the side panel as you might with a painted MDF type job is out!
 

Darrenp

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I have a job to make some wardrobes for a client, they want a wardrobe either side of the bed with a bridging unit of cupboards over the bed and between the two wardrobes.

The material will be MFC (most likely) or similar pre-finished board and back panels are required.

What would be my best options for fixing the back panels to the side panels where the side panels will be fully seen on the external face as just screwing through the side panel as you might with a painted MDF type job is out!
You can use dowels.
you could attach 2x1 etc to the inside of the side panels and then attach the the back panel 👍
 

Setch

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Pin the back to a rebate in the sides or use a thicker back material and pocket hole it to the sides.
 

Bill Derr

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Several ways it would seem - any love for biscuits and glue (domino not an option)
 

Rorton

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depends on the thickness of the back panel material I guess, biscuits would perhaps be a bit overkill for thinnish back material, ok for 18mm 3/4

I would put a rebate into the side panel, deep enough for the thickness of the back panel, then pin or even screws through

How thick are you making the back panel?
 

Rorton

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biscuits would work I guess then, but the aim is to hide the end of the back panel so you dont see it - like this?

Your not going to have a lot of meat in the remainder of the rebate to put a biscuit in, you could I guess make the rebate greater than 9mm, but then perhaps risk loosing strength in the smaller thickness that is left - id glue and pin it
backpanel.jpg
 

Doug71

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Bear in mind that the walls probably won't be straight so you need to hold the back panel in the appropriate amount so you can scribe the sides of the cabinet to the walls.

Another (better?) option is to fit the cabinets then face the side with a decorative panel which can be scribed to the wall and will also cover any fixings in the side of the cabinets.
 

Rorton

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Bear in mind that the walls probably won't be straight so you need to hold the back panel in the appropriate amount so you can scribe the sides of the cabinet to the walls.

Another (better?) option is to fit the cabinets then face the side with a decorative panel which can be scribed to the wall and will also cover any fixings in the side of the cabinets.
that's a good idea, bit like they do with kitchen end panels.

Could also then have the door mounted on the 'front' of the cabinet, and then bring this decorative panel flush with the door to make it look like its an inlay/flush door
 

Bill Derr

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Thanks for all your suggestions, I have given it some thought and discussed it with the client and the 'end panel' version makes seems best as the underside of the bridging units have an under (end) panel to hide the showing edges so having end panels on the upright adjacent side makes sense as it will make it all look in keeping - plus it means I can just screw it all together with confirmats :)
 

RobinBHM

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all together with confirmats
I've been doing that for years....easiest, quickest way to knock together carcases.

I use the super expensive hafele clamps that go with them.

Years ago I ordered 2, thinking £18,50+vat isn't bad
Then got the invoice and discovered the clamps were £185.00+vat each
 
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