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Wall mount fixing for fabric covered panels (headboard)

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Rorton

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So the wife has decided she likes the look of these headboards, made up of rectangle wooden panels, covered with foam and material, and attached to the wall, bit like this:

IMG_0730.jpeg


My quandary is fixing these to the wall. If I had some space above the panels, I could use many of the fixings that are 'hook' like, and lift the panel up then drop down, but my problem is that these panels will need to fit perfectly into the gap in some fitted wardrobes and top cupboards, so no room to lift up and drop down.

Bit like this:

Headboard 1.jpg


I have seen one fixing in America called a Beau Clip that looks just the ticket, but expensive and not easily available here.



Any ideas on how to fix these panels to the wall which are removable - I could just glue them to the wall, but if I ever wanted to replace/repair one, would be a bit of a pain.
 

Cabinetman

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How about a frame or mitred pieces between the panels that hold them to the wall, wouldn’t need to be more than 20mm including a small rebate on each side to hold the panels.
Or Velcro? Ian
 

Rorton

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Thanks for the reply - velcro im not sure would be strong enough, these panels will be 666 x 333mm and 12 or 18mm mdf/ply

With regards panels holding them in, do you mean a bit like a door with multiple glazed panels in? The panels will have quite thick foam and the material pulled tight, and I think the frame would then squish up the foam a bit?

Im not adverse to making the individual panels, and then screwing each one to a main backing board (perhaps 2 boards) and then could secure this to the wall if it makes it less complicated to secure one or 2 bigger pieces.

If doing this way, its possible I could then screw through the sides of the wardrobe into the backing board panel to hold it in place?
 

Old.bodger

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A few thoughts…….(allow for the fact that I undertook upholstery for a living for some years - so hard won experience!) firstly stretching fabric over foam to get a nice uniform edge radius is tricky, any lack of uniformity in tension distorts the edge. You may be experienced - then please forgive!
A scrim felt underneath allows the fabric to slide - even better do the whole thing with FR calico first then add the top cover. You are going to need to be very accurate with your panel sizes and allow for fabric thickness or again you will cause ‘puckering‘ when fitting them (or leave gaps if you go too small) …..as to fixing…..if you don’t mind it being fairly permanent…….have you considered a sort of ‘dot and dab’ method using something like CT3 or Gripfill? If you set up the dots of adhesive (fairly big!) and then rapidly intersperse with some large dots of hot melt you can get an instant grab whilst your main adhesive goes off.…….works with notice boards!
 
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Rorton

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thanks for the tips, im not experienced in this so the more info the better :) I have seen people using some which material which im guessing now is the calico, on top of the foam, and then putting the main fabric on top.

Your right with the measurements though, im wondering now if I should leave myself enough of a gap that looking meaningful at the top and sides to allow me some margin of error, if this was as the photo, then they had room to move the panels about, im probably making it harder trying to perfectly fit an exact space.

With regards the fixing, I didn't want to go fo a glue'd fixing, if I needed to remove a panel for whatever reason, I would end up pulling the plaster off and making a bit of a mess, so was looking to stay away from that if possible.
 

Cabinetman

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With regards panels holding them in, do you mean a bit like a door with multiple glazed panels in? The panels will have quite thick foam and the material pulled tight, and I think the frame would then squish up the foam a bit?
You could do it that way or individual pieces with mitres, it wouldn’t squish if you left room between the panels for all of the wood except the rebates which, only being a couple of mm would nip the material as it left the ply backing board.
Velcro would work, done correctly it can be incredibly strong.
 

JSW

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It's only the very top edge of the last (ascending) run of panels that needs a discreet/hidden fixing. The ones beneath could be Keku clips or even french cleats (12mm thick would be ample)

Velcro would work, done correctly it can be incredibly strong.
That would probably be my choice also, as CM said, done correctly you'll struggle to get them back off, be warned! (y) ;)
 

robgul

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Two answers - for all the panels bar the top ones:

1 We have a headboard in similar style (but just one piece) - that's on the wall with a timber French cleat - works fine. The headboard is made from a sheet of 12mm ply with foam pad and lining fabric covering and then the visible fabric - turned over the edges and stapled. The French cleat rail is glued and screwed to the plywood

2 In the same concept we have a couple of mirrors fixed to walls using metal strips (in effect French cleats) - one set is holding up a framed mirror that's about 2m wide and 1m high and very heavy.
See these from Amazon Heavy Duty Picture & Mirror Hanger Z Bar/French Cleat - Floating Hanging System + Fittings - 450mm : Amazon.co.uk: DIY & Tools

For the top panels a frame and magnets (using strong magnets) would work fine and just push into the gap.
 

niall Y

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Hi Rorton,
This is my first post - so do forgive any typos
I have encountered a similar problem in the past - trying to invisibly fix a panel whilst at the same time have it touch the ceiling. This was done by using French cleats, upside-down. That way the panel can be pushed tight up tp the ceiling. You would then obviously have to screw a batten at the base to stop the assembly sliding back down.
If you were to reproduce the exact same look, as in the photo you posted. Then it might be easier to split the panel into three equal vertical sections. That way each side panels could be slid onto three french cleats ( placed the right way up, in this instance ) You could then use the upside-down French cleats method to fix the middle section. That way, the fixing batten would be hidden behind the bed.,,,Hope this he[ps you work things out
Niall
 

robgul

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So the wife has decided she likes the look of these headboards, made up of rectangle wooden panels, covered with foam and material, and attached to the wall, bit like this:

View attachment 119531

My quandary is fixing these to the wall. If I had some space above the panels, I could use many of the fixings that are 'hook' like, and lift the panel up then drop down, but my problem is that these panels will need to fit perfectly into the gap in some fitted wardrobes and top cupboards, so no room to lift up and drop down.

Bit like this:

View attachment 119532

I have seen one fixing in America called a Beau Clip that looks just the ticket, but expensive and not easily available here.



Any ideas on how to fix these panels to the wall which are removable - I could just glue them to the wall, but if I ever wanted to replace/repair one, would be a bit of a pain.
The Beau Clip can be bought through Amazon UK - USD$31 for 25 clips incl shipping/taxes etc according to the listing - doesn't seem bad value. [I have an application that might work with them so may consider a purchase ... when the customer makes his mind up on what he wants!]
 

Rorton

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thanks - some great thinking about excluding the top row, I looked at all panels needing the same but yep, all rows bar the top can have std cleat or similar fixings, and Niall, thanks for that, that's a great idea also.

I did look on Uk amazon and those Beau clips were more expensive there, but the amazon.com site looks like its worth a punt, so I think im gonna go for a pack as am intrigued by them now.

Im thinking I may be best splitting this into 2 panels. Panel 1 is the full width and height of the top section of my 3d model, and contains 9 upholstered panels (3x3)

this will be 1m x 2m in size, manageable to get up the stairs. Then a second panel with the remainder. Then I attach the individual panels to these bigger panels, and clip the bigger panels to the wall?
 

robgul

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thanks - some great thinking about excluding the top row, I looked at all panels needing the same but yep, all rows bar the top can have std cleat or similar fixings, and Niall, thanks for that, that's a great idea also.

I did look on Uk amazon and those Beau clips were more expensive there, but the amazon.com site looks like its worth a punt, so I think im gonna go for a pack as am intrigued by them now.

Im thinking I may be best splitting this into 2 panels. Panel 1 is the full width and height of the top section of my 3d model, and contains 9 upholstered panels (3x3)

this will be 1m x 2m in size, manageable to get up the stairs. Then a second panel with the remainder. Then I attach the individual panels to these bigger panels, and clip the bigger panels to the wall?
Thinking about the need for accuracy with the Beau clips I think I would position my panel board without the upholstery then drill through the board and into the wall to make sure the male and female parts register - then upholster the board and fit the clips - that SHOULD make it simple!!
 

Cabinetman

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Good thought about needing accuracy for the positions, the way I always do it is to drive panel pins into one part and cut the heads off 3mm proud which leaves them sharp and then when the piece is in position thump it to mark the wall with the pins. Fairly infallible. Ian
 

Rorton

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yeah, there is a video I saw on YouTube that suggest you do this...


This guy used battens on the wall first, offered up his un upholstered panel, screwed it to the batons, got it level and exactly where he wanted it.
Then he used a 6mm bit, and drilled through there board, and into the battens.

Then on the back of the Beuaclips, there is a 6mm protruding piece which sits in this hole to centralise it
 

PerryGunn

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I'd use some neodymium magnets, they're cheap and very strong - I use two of them to hold my (heavy) folding MFT against the wall.

Recess the circular magnets into the wooden frames (one per corner) and screw the steel washers to the wall

These are the ones I used but there are plenty of others

 
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