Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

wall chaser

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Phil Pascoe

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
29 Jan 2012
Messages
19,947
Reaction score
799
Location
Shaft City, Mid Cornish Desert
I've just bought one of these - https://www.aldi.co.uk/ferrex-wall-chas ... E743256D00
I haven't tried it other than to switch it on, but it seems to be a half decent bit of kit - at 1500w it's a chunk - with a decent case, with storage for for discs. For what electricians charge, it won't take long to justify its existence, and I have numerous small jobs spread over a time, so it'll be ideal. I thought the chisel odd, but it's obviously meant to be inserted in the cut to lever the waste out. I'm impressed so far.
DSCF0096.JPG
 

Attachments

MikeG.

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,177
Reaction score
674
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
The most important part of a chaser isn't in that box. Far and away the most important thing is the vacuum it is attached to, which needs to be a serious industrial jobbie, preferably with auto-on/ off switching with the chaser.
 

sunnybob

wysiwyg
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,399
Reaction score
160
Location
cyprus
I watched the cypriot builders chasing walls on my estate as it was built (I was the first inhabitant). Clay blocks all the way. They were using ordinary disc cutters, but they did put a hankie over their mouths :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :roll:
Within seconds of starting they just disappeared, until about 30 seconds after you heard the disc cutter stop, then shapes started appearing in the red fog.
I think most of them died young. (hammer)
 

Distinterior

Established Member
Joined
8 Mar 2014
Messages
721
Reaction score
42
Location
Colchester, Essex.
I have, what appears to be, a very similar machine to the one in your picture. I've had mine for 15 years, at least. Mine came from Screwfix and was branded Titan. Not the best quality by a long way but it has not let me down in all those years. I don't use it a lot, perhaps 5 or 6 times a year when the job/project requires it.

The only small issue I have had with mine is the On/Off switch can be difficult to turn on occasionally. not too surprising considering just how much abrasive dust these things chuck about....

As Mike said, a good quality Extractor is a must, otherwise you will be in a world of dust. I wouldn't entertain using it in a Clients home without....!
 

Stanleymonkey

Established Member
Joined
15 Jun 2014
Messages
810
Reaction score
54
Location
South West London
sunnybob":kfv5pzyz said:
I watched the cypriot builders chasing walls on my estate as it was built (I was the first inhabitant). Clay blocks all the way. They were using ordinary disc cutters, but they did put a hankie over their mouths :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :roll:
Within seconds of starting they just disappeared, until about 30 seconds after you heard the disc cutter stop, then shapes started appearing in the red fog.
I think most of them died young. (hammer)

When I re-wired my kitchen I had to chase a lot of cables into the red bricks. I had to keep stopping when I couldn't see the angle grinder any more!! Let the dust settle and chase a bit more! I think I wore a dust mask though!
 

MikeJhn

Grunkel
Joined
2 Sep 2014
Messages
4,082
Reaction score
79
Location
Kent mostly and France the rest
When I did the chasing in our utility room I closed the door opened the window and had an industrial fan at waist height to blow the dust outside, Oh yes I also had a 2500watt vacuum on the machine, the amount of dust was such my neighbour called the fire brigade which was nice of her. =D>
 

Trainee neophyte

[Known Putin apologist ]
Joined
12 Apr 2019
Messages
2,359
Reaction score
194
Location
Greece
sunnybob":1eaovy0e said:
I watched the cypriot builders chasing walls on my estate as it was built (I was the first inhabitant). Clay blocks all the way. They were using ordinary disc cutters, but they did put a hankie over their mouths :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :roll:
Within seconds of starting they just disappeared, until about 30 seconds after you heard the disc cutter stop, then shapes started appearing in the red fog.
I think most of them died young. (hammer)
Greek builders do it with a hammer. Seriously - you build a wall out of red air brick, carefully, so it has nice, undulating waves in it (they don't do straight and level - probably something to do with earthquakes), and then the electrician comes in and just smashes channels with a hammer - shards of brick everywhere. Squidge some conduit pipe in the newly created gap, and throw a bit of cement in to "make good". What could possibly go wrong?

It's a bit challenging when you have just paid to have the wall built, but after 10 years or so the memory becomes less raw. Eventually, you even come to terms with it.
 

HappyHacker

Established Member
Joined
1 Jan 2016
Messages
398
Reaction score
19
Location
Chester
I did try mine without an extractor and found after a few seconds I could not see the wall. Now I put Henry onto it and that generally works OK without much dust except when the shrouding is not in contact with the wall but I would not use it in a furnished room without lots of dust proof dust sheets.

I found mine is quite good at finding cables in walls :shock:
 

sunnybob

wysiwyg
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,399
Reaction score
160
Location
cyprus
Trainee neophyte":1j3r8rpg said:
sunnybob":1j3r8rpg said:
I watched the cypriot builders chasing walls on my estate as it was built (I was the first inhabitant). Clay blocks all the way. They were using ordinary disc cutters, but they did put a hankie over their mouths :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :roll:
Within seconds of starting they just disappeared, until about 30 seconds after you heard the disc cutter stop, then shapes started appearing in the red fog.
I think most of them died young. (hammer)
Greek builders do it with a hammer. Seriously - you build a wall out of red air brick, carefully, so it has nice, undulating waves in it (they don't do straight and level - probably something to do with earthquakes), and then the electrician comes in and just smashes channels with a hammer - shards of brick everywhere. Squidge some conduit pipe in the newly created gap, and throw a bit of cement in to "make good". What could possibly go wrong?

It's a bit challenging when you have just paid to have the wall built, but after 10 years or so the memory becomes less raw. Eventually, you even come to terms with it.
Strangely, after carefully chasing out the electric conduits in the walls with a disc cutter, they then use your described method (a BFH) to knock out areas for the main electric boxes and central heating manifolds, regularly smashing right through the walls when only half way through would be enough.
 

Eric The Viking

Established Member
Joined
19 Jan 2010
Messages
6,606
Reaction score
61
Location
Bristle, CUBA (the County that Used to Be Avon)
We have lime mortar here and lime plaster, mostly.

I bought a Titan one around 15 years ago. I threw, er, gave it away.

It worked as described, but after I tried it I was threatened with divorce if I tried it again. Actually we were in (rare) agreement. I am sure originally they were intended only for a vary short annual sales window, just after the end of March. Impossible to use in any building containing people, furniture, or any other human artefacts, without destruction of same under corrosive dust. Actually noisier than my (then) teenage children. Horribly difficult to steer, too, especially as any operator is temporarily blinded. And if the plaster is at all dodgy, expect large lumps shaped like Greenland to drop off those neat edges, usually in very obvious places (Mr. Trump, have I got a deal for you...).

As they say in the adverts, "What's to like?"

E.

PS: for those rare occasions, I now get great results, pretty fast, using Saxton carbide cutters in my multi-tool. Small fraction of the mess, and usually a lot neater too.
 

Distinterior

Established Member
Joined
8 Mar 2014
Messages
721
Reaction score
42
Location
Colchester, Essex.
I did use mine recently on an old house that was built in about 1900. The red bricks behind were quite soft and easy to cut but the 1" thick render on the wall had the strength of Kryptonite. Thankfully, the complete house was in the process of being refurbished, so even though I still had my chaser connected to my dust extractor via a 50mm hose, the small percentage of dust that still escaped didnt matter too much. A mask, goggles and gloves are also part of the set-up.......
 

TFrench

Established Member
Joined
6 Jul 2015
Messages
1,264
Reaction score
88
Location
Leics
I have a titan one, its done me proud. It was great for chopping in the back boxes into the walls as well - I used it to plunge in on each edge of where I wanted the box, left a nice little pattern of squares that just popped out. With all the chases I had to do I reckon it saved me a full day - let alone how much cleanup time it saved (firmly duct taped to the extractor!)
 
Top