Wadkin AGS knowledge required

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LJM

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Yeah, I’d agree that as a slider the AGSP is limited. On the other hand, it’s compact… but I have been eyeing up SP12’s!
 

JobandKnock

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As standard they had a 4ft crosscut capacity (mine had a 5ft capacity - not in the price list, but available at extra cost). Mine also had a bigger motor - although still only one motor and the same scorer arrangement as an AGSP. Better saw for panel work (sliding table runs right against the blade), but less handy for solid wood. I seem to recall that member @Sgian Dubh wrote an article about his in FWW many years back
 
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Fitzroy

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I’ve field disassembled a number of machines now. I always take metric and imperial spanners and Allen keys, 30mm adjustable wrench, mole grips, circlip pliers, hammer, 4 and 6mm drift. Impact driver with set of bits.

With those Tools I’ve managed to get most tools in to manageable chunks. Although these main chassis of thus saw looks like a bit single piece, but perhaps of sheet steel, so big but not too heavy.

Great looking saw btw.
 

Stevekane

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I have to say that Deemas suggestion of keeping the whole thing largely together and rolling it into the back of the van sounds like the way to do it, he's moved these things before and says that its a relativly easy 2 man job, and you end up with the saw sitting nice and stable on a bit of any old sheet material where it cant come to much harm once its strapped down.
Its a lovely looking saw,,
Steve
 

KT_NorCal

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Would be interested in seeing how that sliding table works/is attached to the saw/bar.... I have an earlier AGS and just found a sliding table attachment that will probably work on it, but think I may modify it...
 

LJM

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I have to say that Deemas suggestion of keeping the whole thing largely together and rolling it into the back of the van sounds like the way to do it, he's moved these things before and says that its a relativly easy 2 man job, and you end up with the saw sitting nice and stable on a bit of any old sheet material where it cant come to much harm once its strapped down.
Its a lovely looking saw,,
Steve

Likewise, I’ve moved these things before, so the purpose of my question is not really to find out the best or easiest way to move a saw, but to ascertain the quickest and easiest means of reducing the mass of the machine, if needs be.

The owner is 91 and suffering dementia. His friend is facilitating the sale, and will be on hand. However, for all I know the friend is just as old and of little help physically. Equally, I don’t know what access is like etc. So with all the unknowns, it’s a matter of going prepared for the worst case scenario, with the aim of being quick and efficient.

I’m confident that I can dismantle and rebuild this machine, if needs be. But as Pete pointed out, doing so in the gentleman’s home, could be a distressing experience for him, hence wanting to be as prepared as possible so as to make the process neat, tidy and as quick as possible.
 

JobandKnock

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Would be interested in seeing how that sliding table works/is attached to the saw/bar....
From memory...

The sliding table top is bolted onto a long round bar at right angles. This moves backwards and forwards on two large V-rollers attached to the side of the saw cabinet. Above the bar, are two smaller bearings which have bent brass scrapers attached to them, also attachedctonthe saw caninet. Remove those two (metric Allen key) and the bar should lift off. At each end of the bar there is also a circular steel stop, held, I think, by a washer and cap head machine screw. Take the back end stop off and it should be possible to pull the bar off towards the front of the saw - if taking the top bearings off doesn't work. Either way take the table off FIRST (two bolts) before removing the bar

At the front of the machine there is a swing arm supported on a casting. I seem to recall mine had a threaded pin top and bottom which could be wound out to get the arm off

At the outer end of the support arm should be a black plastic cylinder about 4 to 6 inches long x maybe 1-1/2in diameter which fits over the spigot at the outer end of the arm. At the top of this is a ball bearing on which the table is supported. These are easy to lose, so you may needcto huntbforbit

When the slider table is lifted to the working position and supported on the arm the extruded aluminium ctoss cut fence can be dropped on and locked in position (captive screws on the table? Can't remember). It can be locked either onto the front or the rear of the table and should have one sliding flip stop on the main body of the fence and one fixed to the pull our section at the outer end (left end) on the fence.

The rip fence generally runs on a large steel bar bolted at two places onto the front lip of the top casting (if the saw was fitted with the optional sheet metal RH extension there is a longer rip fence bar and a third attachment stud on the rip fence bar). Mid way down the right side of the saw there should be a second rip fence support bar which is also bolted onto the apron at the side, but if the saw is/was fitted with the RH extension table this rear support bar may be missing or omitted

Hope that isn't too turgid and that it helps. Please bear in mind, though, that it is 30+ years since I owned one of these and my memory may not be 100%
 
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LJM

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From memory...

The carraige is bolted onto a long circular bar at right angles. The moves backwards and forwards on two large V-rollers attached ton the side of the saw. Above the bar, are two smaller bearings which have bent brass scrapers attached to them. Remove those two (metric Allen key) and the bar lifts off. At each end of the bar is a circular steel stop. Take the back one of those off and it should be possible to pull the bar off towards the front of the saw if takingbthe top bearings off doesn't work. Either way take the table off FIRST before removing the bar

At the front of the machine there is a swing arm supported on a casting. I seem to recall mine had a threaded pin top and bottom which could be wound out to get the arm off

At the outer end of the support arm should be a black plastic rod about 4 to 6 inches long x maybe 1-1/2in diameter which fits over a spigot on the arm. At the top of this is a ball besring on which the table is supported. These are easy to lose.

When the auxilliary table is lifted to rhe working position and supported on the arm the extruded aluminium fence can be dropped on and locked in position (captive screwsxon the table?). It can be locked either onto the front or the rear of the table and should have one sliding flip stop and one fixed to the pull our section at the outer end (left end) on the fence

The rip fence generally runs on a large steel bar bolted at two places onto the front lip of the top casting (if the saw was fitted with the optional sheet metal RH extension there is a longer bar and a third attachment stud on the rip fence bar). Mid way down the right side of the saw there should be a second rip fence support bar which is also bolted onto the apron at the side

Hope that isn't too turgid and that it helps. Please bear in mind, though, that it is 30+ years since I owned one of these and my memory may not be 100%

Excellent! Thanks very much. Broadly, I was thinks that that would be how it goes together/comes apart, but that’s given me some useful assurance and insight.
 

JobandKnock

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I did reread that and I've taken some of the spelling errors out plus added a few minor details. Those steel bars, for the rip fence and the sliding carraige aren't light so for safety's sake I'd recommend a second body to help you

In terms of dating a mate if mine reckons that it may be older than I thought. He reckons the boxy body version is an earlier, very early 1980s for a couple years and was available for a short period until.the "definitive" model which replaced it. Hence no manuals. Only the maker's plate would confirm this

Good luck with your saw
 

LJM

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I did reread that and I've taken some of the spelling errors out plus added a few minor details. Those steel bars, for the rip fence and the sliding carraige aren't light so for safety's sake I'd recommend a second body to help you

In terms of dating a mate if mine reckons that it may be older than I thought. He reckons the boxy body version is an earlier, very early 1980s for a couple years and was available for a short period until.the "definitive" model which replaced it. Hence no manuals. Only the maker's plate would confirm this

Good luck with your saw

Interesting; that sort of date was in my head, based on the typeface used. Also it seemed logical to me that the solid carriage on this saw pre-dated the grid style seen in the documented versions.

When I get my hands on it, I’ll be sure to share what I learn about the saw.
 

Inspector

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Something to consider if going the "flip the saw on its back" route. The carriage was never meant to hang upside down especially with the weight of the motor on it. If doing that remove the blade, nut and washer and put a good sized block on top of the carriage. Raise the blade until the carriage is snug against the table. That way when inside down the carriage is resting on the block. Might want to bring a board you can saw to length and notch with a hand saw to wedge under the motor when It is upside down too.

Pete
 

JobandKnock

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Pete, you really need to get the carraige and its' associated gubbins off, partly because the bar that the carraige traverses on is about 7 ft long and the swinging arm sticks out about 3 feet. Similarly the rip fence front bar, rip fence rear support bar (if present) and the optional RH extension table (if present (along with the rip fence itself) need to come off to reduce the footprint, and reduce the liklihood of damage to both the vehicle and saw in transit. The suggestion about taking the crown guard, riving knife and blade off are also valid given that, as I stated, these machines are top heavy. That said they are fairly light and easy to move - I twice moved mine on my own in a tail lift Transit 3.5 tonner (but needed help to put it together again afterwards)
 

LJM

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Pete, you really need to get the carraige and its' associated gubbins off, partly because the bar that the carraige traverses on is about 7 ft long and the swinging arm sticks out about 3 feet. Similarly the rip fence front bar, rip fence rear support bar (if present) and the optional RH extension table (if present (along with the rip fence itself) need to come off to reduce the footprint, and reduce the liklihood of damage to both the vehicle and saw in transit. The suggestion about taking the crown guard, riving knife and blade off are also valid given that, as I stated, these machines are top heavy. That said they are fairly light and easy to move - I twice moved mine on my own in a tail lift Transit 3.5 tonner (but needed help to put it together again afterwards)

I think Pete was talking about the trunnions and associated parts, rather than the sliding carriage.
 

JobandKnock

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Ah, i sssumed sliding csrraige, not trunnion. The only other bits there which can cause issues might be the handle at the front, and the sheet metal dust exhaust at the rear (if fitted - that was another option)
 

LJM

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Ah, i sssumed sliding csrraige, not trunnion. The only other bits there which can cause issues might be the handle at the front, and the sheet metal dust exhaust at the rear (if fitted - that was another option)

If it come to it (for instance if I can’t get the van near enough to the machine), i presume that the table is simply attached with a few bolts and so can be lifted off with these removed?
 

JobandKnock

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Never tried it TBH. For starters you still need to get the sliding gear and the rip fence stuff off (almost all bolted to the top - the swing arm gets in the way and needs to be tied back or removed). Then you need to disconnect all the wiring snd take the handle off
 

LJM

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Never tried it TBH. For starters you still need to get the sliding gear and the rip fence stuff off (almost all bolted to the top - the swing arm gets in the way and needs to be tied back or removed). Then you need to disconnect all the wiring snd take the handle off

Yeah, that’s myintention, to get the slider, fence and rails, guard and knife off and go from there. Hopefully I can then get the naked saw into the van quite easily.

Thanks for your valuable input!
 

Fitzroy

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You mentioned Aberdeen a few times, I’m assuming that’s not where the saw is, but if it is (or within 30miles) and you need a lift with it feel free to drop me a message.
 

LJM

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You mentioned Aberdeen a few times, I’m assuming that’s not where the saw is, but if it is (or within 30miles) and you need a lift with it feel free to drop me a message.

Much appreciated, but it’s in Cumbria
 

ScottandSargeant

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SP12 was 4‘ stroke and was available with 1ph as an option. They also introduced a version of this with a swinging arm support instead of the big outrigger table, but not many made.
 
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