Wadkin AGS knowledge required

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LJM

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Morning all,

I’ve just bought a Wadkin Bursgreen AGS saw (pictured) from an elderly gentleman, who is selling due to the onset of mild dementia. I’m due to collect it on Monday, and would like to make it an easy process for him, as much as for me. So, can anyone guide me on the necessary steps and tools required to get this into pieces I can handle by myself?

I’ve searched the usual places for manuals and diagrams, but can’t locate anything on this specific model.

Thanks
 

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Ttrees

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You've presumably came across Deema's posts?
I'd give you a link, but there's quite a few came up in the search.
Good luck with it

Tom
 

deema

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That’s a Wadkin AGS250 or 300. The guts are very similar to the AGS10, never tried swapping bits between the two so can’t say they are identical. You need a set of imperial and metric Allen keys, socket set metric and WW and a set of spanner’s again metric and imperial. Just in case it’s imperial / has some imperial fasteners.
 

LJM

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Excellent, thanks!

As I mentioned, the owner is old, dementia setting in, so information has been scant (I’m taking a bit of a gamble, really); it comes with a selection of blades, including a scoring blade, however he couldn’t tell me whether the machine actually takes one! Should I expect it to take one?
 

MARK.B.

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Looking at the picture I can't see where a scoring blade would go as there is no cut out in the top to take one
 

clogs

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LGM
1/2 the job is done as it's on wheels.....
go rent/borrow a Transit and take 3 mates...easy to get in the back.....
would never take em apart unless at home....
it's not that heavy....
 

LJM

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LGM
1/2 the job is done as it's on wheels.....
go rent/borrow a Transit and take 3 mates...easy to get in the back.....
would never take em apart unless at home....
it's not that heavy....

nice idea; I’ve moved saws before, so know the score. but:

a. I own a vw van
b. I’ll be en route to Aberdeen; I’ll struggle to drag anyone along with me
 

clogs

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sorry, I didn't know.....
just a thought,
perhaps u could offer say £50 for four lads to turn up....job n finish...
would only take 1/2 max....
If I was still living there me and a couple of mates would have turned up to help u....
 

LJM

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As long as the table, fence and slider come off reasonably simply, I think it should be straightforward.

Deema’s given me a good idea of tools to take, so really all that’s left is any insights on the particular machine which may make any necessary disassembly easier.

I agree; the same simplest way would be to get many hand on it. I do have one guy coming, which will help.
 

Gremmy

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These saws are really easy to strip down. Ensure you have some open ended “crows feet” spanners to allow you to take the table off. You won’t get a socket set or full ring spanner on 2 of the nuts.
Should be metric, but perhaps take come imperials just in case it has some grandfathered parts from the imperial AGS models.
will/should be held on 4 studs with nuts, accessible from the finger plate hole and from the opening side where the motor is attached.

I’m not necessarily the most naturally mechanically minded, but even I managed to take an AGS apart, so from the questions you’re asking, you’ll have no trouble!

Keep us updated with your progress!

best

S.
 

deema

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It could be a Wadkin AGSP, that was basically the AGS300 with a few extra bits. The saw blade can only project something like 75mm if the scorer is fitted. It’s a standard scoring blade. However, I thought, but could be wrong they were badged up as AGSP, where as yours is just AGS. A lovely saw regardless of which it is.

The easiest way to load these saws into a van without stripping them is to remove the bars and then ease the top down onto the edge of the van and then roll it over into the van so that the top is on the floor of the van. It needs two people, but neither has to be strong to do it. I put a thick piece of ply on my bumper just in case I’ve misjudged the distance / the other person loses grip. Stops running your day!
An engine crane is handy if your in your own.
 

MARK.B.

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Thanks deema ,never thought the scorer would govern the blade height so would use the same slot, mine has a separate cut out for the scorer blade Elektra Beckum PKF 255 V8:)
 

Inspector

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I'm curious if lift gate trucks are available for rent where you are. I rented a 3 ton cube truck with a lift gate when I bought my metal lathe and milling machine. With a little care you could roll the saw on to the gate and up it goes, to be rolled inside the truck for tie down. Tie and chock it to the lift gate when raising and lowering. Reverse when arriving home. It wasn't expensive as long as you avoided the end and middle of the month when they are in demand for renters moving. Sure beats the risk of damage to the saw, hernias and blown out backs not to mention you can do it without taking it apart.

One other thing to consider with someone with dementia. When there are a bunch of strangers around especially messing with their stuff they can get quite agitated. Keep that in mind and try to be as quiet as you guys can when working and talking. Another reason a lift gate is a plus, you are in and out with the least disruption.

Pete
 

LJM

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@deema I like that flip it on its top idea. I’m actually trying to get my hands on an engine crane because I’m picking up a P/T later in the week; if I can get one by Monday, I’ll take it along.

As for exactly what model it is, I’ve found very few references to a saw looking visually the same, with no technical details; I’ve found info in later versions, where specs are clearer. Hence the uncertainty in what I’m getting!

I’m slightly reluctant to rent any lifting equipment because I’m off to Aberdeen and so will have the gear on hire for too long; I may as well buy it!

Thanks for the input so far.
 

LJM

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One other thing to consider with someone with dementia. When there are a bunch of strangers around especially messing with their stuff they can get quite agitated. Keep that in mind and try to be as quiet as you guys can when working and talking. Another reason a lift gate is a plus, you are in and out with the least disruption.

Pete

Exactly Pete, that why I’m asking, really; normally I’d be quite happy to turn up with some tools, and work out what was needed on the spot.

I’ve so far dealt with a friend of the owner, who has assured me that it will be ok to dismantle as necessary, but I’d like to make the process as simple and efficient.

And equally, this is another reason to avoid all hands on deck approach; if it can be done simply and efficiently with just his trusted friend and myself in his home, so much the better.
 

JobandKnock

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It isn't an AGSP - not only did they clearly say "AGSP" on the front, but also on the makers plate at the back. The blade guard was also elongated to cover the scorer and the throat plate (insert) was longer with a longer slot in it. If it takes a 12in blade it is most likely AGS250/300 - they can take a 300mm (12in) blade but can't drop it below the table (it stays proud by 50mm/2in) whereas with a 250mm (10in) blade the blade will retract fully.
EDIT: Old age? Mea culpa but I'm mistaken - the AGSP with a 250mm blade still leaves the blade 50mm proud at minimum blade height. TBH after 35 years I just forgot that!

In the 1980s I went to Green Lane to see an AGSP before buying one - necessary because there wasn't a single one in a dealer in the UK at the time. Yours looks like the revised version brought out in the 1990s before the machines went blue/white but after the earlier style saws had been restyled (possibly after the Evenwood sell-off? Evenwood in Cleveland were Wadkin's sheet metal fabrication division from the late 1960s onwards but got sold off in one of the several collapses the firm endured)

One thing I will say about them is that they are fairly lightweight machines by Wadkin standards an ideally need bolting down to the floor if you handle longer stuff (don't ask)
 
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JobandKnock

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I can tell you - if I was in the market for a small Wadkin with a scorer I wouldn't be looking for another AGSP. The same-era SP12 (which is is what my AGSP got swapped for) or the later SP/130 are both better saws if you have the space, and BGPSs are too old and likely to have been hammered
 

LJM

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I can tell you - if I was in the market for a small Wadkin with a scorer I wouldn't be looking for another AGSP. The same-era SP12 (which is is what my AGSP got swapped for) or the later SP/130 are both better saws if you have the space, and BGPSs are too old and likely to have been hammered

Interesting. In what ways is the SP12 better? The requisite space is the key!
 

JobandKnock

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Larger sliding table, although mine was still only a 5ft stroke. That big square sliding table meany the saw wasn't tippy like the AGSP was. But it was a far larger saw.
 
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