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AndyT

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Big screws ("lag screws") are best - you don't want stray metalwork on the top of your bench.

If you don't want to turn your bench upside down, hold a bit of wood in the vice when fitting it, long enough to act as a leg, reaching down to the floor. This will take most of the weight while you screw it in place.
 

Trevanion

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AndyT":3dyexpq3 said:
If you don't want to turn your bench upside down, hold a bit of wood in the vice when fitting it, long enough to act as a leg, reaching down to the floor. This will take most of the weight while you screw it in place.
My god, why didn't I ever think of that before!? That would've saved a whole load of strain holding up a vice and operating a ratchet whilst crammed underneath a bench more than once!
 

AndyT

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I learned it from someone on here - I think it's worth repeating!
 

AJB Temple

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Good installation tip.

However, it's a small, not especially good, vice and you will regret it. In your shoes I would return to B&Q for a refund and get a significantly bigger vice (not from there). Look at Axminster et al. Or used eBay.

This will save you time and frustration in the end.
 

Primer

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AndyT":o8fx1sk7 said:
Big screws ("lag screws") are best - you don't want stray metalwork on the top of your bench.

If you don't want to turn your bench upside down, hold a bit of wood in the vice when fitting it, long enough to act as a leg, reaching down to the floor. This will take most of the weight while you screw it in place.
Amazing tip!
 

Trevanion

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I agree with AJB (Once again, he's good like that :wink: ), the vice you've bought is a bit pants, to put it bluntly :lol:. The vice will probably work fine but I wouldn't trust it to last, it's probably made with the cheapest grade of Chinesium cast iron which may be liable to snap or strip the threads if heavy load is exerted or you hammer heavily on something in the vice (which is bad practice regardless of how good the vice is).

A new decent vice is a hell of an investment though, a new Record Irwin vice is in excess of £100 and these aren't "as good as they used to be" so the only real alternative for picking up a good vice is second-hand. There are plenty of brands out there such as Record (Pre-Irwin), Woden, Paramo, Parkinson and Rededa to name the more common ones you'll find, they range anywhere from £10-100 depending on condition and size. Record are the most common vices to be found and a good Record 52E with quick-release will run you less than £30 secondhand if you look for a good deal and it should last you until your last breath if you look after it.

There are two common sayings when it comes to buying quality gear...

Buy Cheap, Buy Twice.
Buy Once, Cry Once.
 

sunnybob

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Another vote for changing your plans. That vice will either break or bend the fist time you lean on the handle to secure a large piece of wood.

When I started woodworking 5 years ago, I bit the bullet and bought a Record 52 1/2 quick release vice. It MIGHT not be as strong as the same vice 50 years old, but I'm no lightweight (200lbs) and I have seriously leant on that handle while gluing blocks of wood together, and not a sign of movement.
By comparison, I did break a silverline cast iron engineers vice with a lot less pressure. it snapped in two and very nearly injured me.

The record did cost a 100 quid, but its still worth 50 of anyones money and my son can inherit it at some time (hopefully when its vintage).
 

thetyreman

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eclipse make a decent record 52 1/2 knock off, I've been happy with mine, I used to think the vintage ones were too expensive but actually they're well worth it as long as it's all working ok, get an early 52 1/2 or 53A if you need even more open space, I slightly regret not getting a 53 now, there are times when having that extra would have been so useful.
 

That would work

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Ebay is full of proper full size vices (52 1/2, 53 etc. And excellent value. You won't regret it.
 

fezman

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Hi Primer,

Another vote for the Eclipse here - had mine a couple of years now and it is well worth the extra money. (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Eclipse-Tools- ... B0043YHD4A)

You can see Paul Sellars install one here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VkTqt-rxQfk .

From your recent posts it seem that your enthusiasm is high and you are tending to rush in and buy things that are being suggested. I did pretty much the same when i started out about 3 years ago. To date i have upgraded / replaced a bandsaw, tablesaw, router, router table, chisels (twice), vice (i bought something similar to the one from B&Q), hand saws, marking gauges - etc, i could go on.

Depending on what you plan to make i would watch 2 or 3 youtube channels for a few days and then review what you actually need. Then buy the best VFM tools you can afford.

So for example if you are planning on making lots of cabinets and built in's, then watch Peter Millards channel - i don't think anyone else in the uk on youtube is better than he for that type of work IMHO.

If you are planning on doing more hand type work such as boxes, small furniture etc, then watch Paul Sellars and the early stuff from Matt Estlea. The thing that influenced me most when starting out was the Paul Sellars Wallclock series. It gives you a basic introduction to preparing materials and then making some dado joints by hand, adding some decorative elements and lastly (but not least) an introduction to using (shellac) finishes.

Good luck and if the WW bug bites, say goodbye to your savings :)

Ian
 

disco_monkey79

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I used multiple sheets of ply to form my bench top, which meant I could use nuts and bolts to fix the vice to the bench through the lower layers, and having a whole sheet on the very top - so no metal for my tools to encounter.
 

Phil Pascoe

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or just counterbore, use bolts or coach screws head upwards and plug the hole. If/when the vice loosens it's easy to tighten up.
 

Bm101

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https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Genuine-Reco ... SwFZdeAi8s
This is the model I have. No Quick release. Meh. If I was a pro I'd get the 52 1/2. I'm not though so this one is more than fine.
This one is twice the price (delivered!) for 10 times the quality.
Take your b and q nonsense back and never darken their door again. Buy this one. Then put rubber bands on the ends of the arm and smile as it is now a ninja vice. *makes kung-fu fu film noises*
 

Phil Pascoe

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Incidentally - especially if you decide to go for a larger vice, if your bench is a decent size and you fix it with coach screws put a few washers under the heads. If you ever have to move house and want to lighten it for transport you can take it off then when you replace it put the screws back without the washers and they'll pull up tight better.
 

AJB Temple

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I wouldn't buy the one in BM101s link. No quick release (really handy) and pop up dog is missing, plus its a 52. Vise is a fundamental tool that will last forever. Spend once and get a decent one with quick release. Some have a screw thread cover which is quite helpful.
 

Primer

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Haha this is a great post - thank you!
The problem is I have been watching wood working videos constantly for months, so as soon as I got this new house with a big garage that’s all mine - I’ve went a bit mad lol

fezman":oy71t8ud said:
Hi Primer,

Another vote for the Eclipse here - had mine a couple of years now and it is well worth the extra money. (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Eclipse-Tools- ... B0043YHD4A)

You can see Paul Sellars install one here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VkTqt-rxQfk .

From your recent posts it seem that your enthusiasm is high and you are tending to rush in and buy things that are being suggested. I did pretty much the same when i started out about 3 years ago. To date i have upgraded / replaced a bandsaw, tablesaw, router, router table, chisels (twice), vice (i bought something similar to the one from B&Q), hand saws, marking gauges - etc, i could go on.

Depending on what you plan to make i would watch 2 or 3 youtube channels for a few days and then review what you actually need. Then buy the best VFM tools you can afford.

So for example if you are planning on making lots of cabinets and built in's, then watch Peter Millards channel - i don't think anyone else in the uk on youtube is better than he for that type of work IMHO.

If you are planning on doing more hand type work such as boxes, small furniture etc, then watch Paul Sellars and the early stuff from Matt Estlea. The thing that influenced me most when starting out was the Paul Sellars Wallclock series. It gives you a basic introduction to preparing materials and then making some dado joints by hand, adding some decorative elements and lastly (but not least) an introduction to using (shellac) finishes.

Good luck and if the WW bug bites, say goodbye to your savings :)

Ian
 

Primer

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Thanks for all the advice.......

I took the b&q One back today and got a refund. Honestly it was terrible in ways that none of you guys even touched on. It was so so bad.

So the hunt is now on for my vice!!
 

Primer

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Another question.

I’m right handed... what’s the common thought on which side of my bench the vice should go on?
 
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