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Vertical radiator on single stud?

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phloaw

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Hi, I have an internal, decorated plasterboard wall with poor studding: from left to right, there is a 22mm wide (i.e., horizontally parallel to the wall) stud, then a 38mm stud (the two studs are spaced 60cm), then the jack stud of the door.
I need to hang a ~2500 BTUs radiator, and I'd prefer to avoid both hanging on plasterboard and adding battens/noggins to fix the brackets.

So I thought to fit a vertical radiator (total width 27cm) by fixing all the four brackets to the 38mm stud via steel plates/flat brackets similar to this one:
https://res.cloudinary.com/rsc/image/upload/b_rgb:FFFFFF,c_pad,dpr_1.0,f_auto,h_281,q_auto,w_500/c_pad,h_281,w_500/F3975008-01?pgw=1


Would that work or be doable?
Any suggestion welcome.
 

RichardG

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I’ve never had any problems mounting radiators on plasterboard as long as you use good fixings that spread the load (assuming it’s 12.5mm plasterboard) The only exception is if the radiator is in a position where someone can use it as a bum rest when it’s cold (my wife!) or as a hand support.

GeeFix plasterboard fixings are not cheap but do an excellent job.

 

Rorschach

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Most rads are fitted onto plasterboard, usually with less than ideal fixings and they still do ok, the L brackets do a good job of spreading the load. Use a decent plasterboard fixing (like the umbrella/expanding anchor type myself) but anything that spreads the load will work, you can add glue to the brackets as well, this really spreads the load over a wide area.
 

Spectric

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I was told some time ago that the reason close coupled toilets are so popular is because the weight of the cistern is transfered into the floor via the pan, much easier than hanging the cistern of stud walls with no structural integrity. Stud walls can be a nightmare, they don't have to be if built with closer stud spacings and plenty of noggins but some of the stud walls you see now are just a joke. You can cut a piece out and slide timber in then screw to it, gives a solid fixing and easy to tidyup to finish, another option are these Easyfix Spring Toggles 3 x 50mm 20 Pack, .

or

 

phloaw

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I’ve never had any problems mounting radiators on plasterboard as long as you use good fixings that spread the load (assuming it’s 12.5mm plasterboard) The only exception is if the radiator is in a position where someone can use it as a bum rest when it’s cold (my wife!) or as a hand support.

GeeFix plasterboard fixings are not cheap but do an excellent job.

Sorry, I forgot to say that the plasterboard is less than 12.5mm, probably 9.5mm (a bit difficult to measure).
What would you suggest? Thanks
 

RichardG

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phloaw

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If you want the full details see the white book.

https://www.british-gypsum.com/~/me...Book/White-Book-C02-Technical-performance.pdf

Page 35. Has the fixing type and loading.

Therefore you should be good for 12kg per fixing so 48kg if 4 fixings, I’d use the GeeFix.

Having said this I would just take a section of plasterboard off and insert some noggins, sounds awful but it’s really not that bad to do.
Yeah, I'm just scared of ripping off stuff, and then I'd need a radiator wide enough to cover the missing wallpaper. Moreover, the other studs are narrow, not sure how strong they are to hold a noggin.
Anyway, your reference looks quite useful, thanks.
 

baldkev

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Hi, if youve got paper that side, whats on the wall the other side of the stud?

Id mark where the studs are, come just inside ( so to the edge of the stud ) and using a multo tool, cut out a decent square stretching from one stud to the other.
Install noggins as appropriate
Put battens down the edges to take the cut out piece of board back in and then refit and decorate. Mesh and fine fill would be advisable but you may want to consinder housing out the plaster for the mesh and filler to sink into ( i do ) otherwise the mesh and filler adds about 1 to 2mm which you have to grade out
 

phloaw

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Hi, if youve got paper that side, whats on the wall the other side of the stud?

Id mark where the studs are, come just inside ( so to the edge of the stud ) and using a multo tool, cut out a decent square stretching from one stud to the other.
Install noggins as appropriate
Put battens down the edges to take the cut out piece of board back in and then refit and decorate. Mesh and fine fill would be advisable but you may want to consinder housing out the plaster for the mesh and filler to sink into ( i do ) otherwise the mesh and filler adds about 1 to 2mm which you have to grade out
That's an idea. However, sadly, the other face of the wall is obstructed by the hot water cylinder and by the bathtub, so it's not workable.
Nice try :)
 

Inspector

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I suppose a piece of plywood large enough to span two studs and the edges nicely beveled for the radiator to attach to is out of the question? Painted to match the wall naturally.

Pete
 

phloaw

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I suppose a piece of plywood large enough to span two studs and the edges nicely beveled for the radiator to attach to is out of the question? Painted to match the wall naturally.

Pete
That could be a last resort. I'll first try to explore the vertical option. Based on current feedback, it looks viable at the moment.
 

baldkev

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I think inspector is onto something.... if youve got a patterned wallpaper and dont want ro mess with it, how about fixing a couple of oak slats spanning the studs and fix the rad to the oak.... nice bevelled edges etc?
 

phloaw

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I think inspector is onto something.... if youve got a patterned wallpaper and dont want ro mess with it, how about fixing a couple of oak slats spanning the studs and fix the rad to the oak.... nice bevelled edges etc?
Could definitely work, too.
So now I'm evaluating the feasibility and overall costs of the two options (the one with a slats and the vertical rad on one stud).
I'll communicate developments :)
 
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