• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Varnished kitchen worktop in lousy condition - which sander please?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

WannabeeCarpenter

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
15 Nov 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
9
Location
Shropshire
I'm finally getting round to decorating the kitchen and the worst part is the worktops. They're wood & were originally varnished (Wickes fitted kitchen) but the previous owners weren't exactly careful so it's both worn and stained. I don't really want to go to the expense of new tops so the plan is to refurb them.

Am I right in saying that an orbital sander is the one to use plus a shaped one for the corners? From what I've read a belt sander would probably be too aggressive but I'd like to get the job done as quickly as possible but without causing any damage :)

Secondary question: please can anybody recommend an oil? I've sanded a few patches, tried 3 very different Osmo oil colours and I actually can't see where they've been applied?!

**EDIT**

To all those who recommended a cabinet scraper........thank you.

One arrived today and in just a couple of minutes I could clearly see the area I tested it on. Not only will this save time & dust but I'll have Popeye forearms at the end!
 
Last edited:

Distinterior

Established Member
Joined
8 Mar 2014
Messages
827
Reaction score
122
Location
Colchester, Essex.
Take a look at Rubio Monocoat oil. I've been using it for years now on wooden kitchen worktops.....never had any issues or failures.
 

TheUnicorn

Established Member
Joined
21 Feb 2020
Messages
742
Reaction score
251
Location
South West
what sort have budget have you got for the sander and will you have use for it afterwards?
 

WannabeeCarpenter

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
15 Nov 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
9
Location
Shropshire
what sort have budget have you got for the sander and will you have use for it afterwards?
Ordinarily I have a 'DIY budget' but I'd happily move upwards as a) I'm not looking forward to doing the kitchen so want to make it as easy as I can, and b) I'm slowly getting into woodworking so it'd almost certainly be used again.

How about £150 - would that get me something half decent?
 

Essex Barn Workshop

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
11 Jul 2020
Messages
115
Reaction score
89
Location
Loughton, Essex
I've got one of these
and am generally happy with it. Well within the budget and leaves enough for a detail sander too.
 

TheUnicorn

Established Member
Joined
21 Feb 2020
Messages
742
Reaction score
251
Location
South West
plenty of options for the 100 - 150 mark, dewalt, makita, milwaukee all have corded options for random orbit sanders in that price range, arguably you could get away with the erbauer or makita MT (red) one for about 50, but IMO your better off spending a bit more if you want it to last. I haven't bought a sander for ages so I'll let others wade in with recomendations for individual machines
 

gog64

Established Member
Joined
19 May 2018
Messages
154
Reaction score
39
Location
herefordshire
Rustins Danish oil has a really nice finish and seems to work well. You have to be patient enough to apply it properly though and allow it time to “cure”. It does yellow the wood a little, but looks great IMO. I did a new beech worktop last week & can post a photo if that helps? I can’t help on the sander (I use various Festool with the dust extraction) however I have heard that there are 101 variants of the Mirka Deros sold under different names, some within your budget. That’s a good sander, so probably what I’d look at in your shoes.
 

WannabeeCarpenter

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
15 Nov 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
9
Location
Shropshire
Rustins Danish oil has a really nice finish and seems to work well. You have to be patient enough to apply it properly though and allow it time to “cure”. It does yellow the wood a little, but looks great IMO. I did a new beech worktop last week & can post a photo if that helps? I can’t help on the sander (I use various Festool with the dust extraction) however I have heard that there are 101 variants of the Mirka Deros sold under different names, some within your budget. That’s a good sander, so probably what I’d look at in your shoes.
If a pic isn't too much trouble then yes please!
 

Just4Fun

Established Member
Joined
21 Sep 2017
Messages
712
Reaction score
149
Location
Finland
One of our worktops is in need of attention. I am tempted to plane it rather than sand it.
 

TheTiddles

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2007
Messages
2,388
Reaction score
412
Location
Wiltshire
When I first got a decent ROS it was a revelation, one of the few tools I instantly wished I’d bought years before I did. I have a Makita BO6030, that plus abranet and an extractor makes fast (and clean) work of sanding, which let’s be honest, is not the fun bit.
Aidan
 

Terry - Somerset

Established Member
Joined
22 Dec 2012
Messages
744
Reaction score
253
Location
Taunton
Someone with more knowledge than I may like to comment.

Is it the sander or the abrasive that is key to getting a quick and decent result.

Should the job start with (say) a 120 grit followed by 240 grit. Or just 240. How fine a grit is required for a decent finish.
 

TheUnicorn

Established Member
Joined
21 Feb 2020
Messages
742
Reaction score
251
Location
South West
there are 101 variants of the Mirka Deros sold under different names, some within your budget. That’s a good sander, so probably what I’d look at in your shoes.
does anyone have any details of these please?
 

profchris

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2015
Messages
855
Reaction score
95
Location
Suffolk
Spending £5 on a cabinet scraper might be worthwhile, to remove the varnish before sanding. You can just draw a file along the edge at 90 degrees to sharpen it as you don't need a fine edge for that job. Hold either side, press with your two thumbs in the middle, angle it forward slightly and push. Varnish slices off, and no dust. I reckon it's about 5 mins to remove 1 square metre - then it gets too hot and your thumbs are tired.

Sand afterwards, but you'll have a lot less of that to do.
 

TheTiddles

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2007
Messages
2,388
Reaction score
412
Location
Wiltshire
Someone with more knowledge than I may like to comment.

Is it the sander or the abrasive that is key to getting a quick and decent result.

Should the job start with (say) a 120 grit followed by 240 grit. Or just 240. How fine a grit is required for a decent finish.
It’s both, plus extraction, you need to get the waste out before it clogs.

A good sander will make a far smoother job with the same paper as a cheap one, a bit like a decent coffee machine and a cheap on with the same coffee.

I’d scrape what I could off as it’s faster then start with 60 grit and go up, 80, 120, 180, 240, higher than that probably won’t do much.
 

cowtown_eric

Established Member
Joined
4 May 2006
Messages
45
Reaction score
22
Location
Calgary Alberta Canada
I was going to suggest scraping the varnish off, but the "tiddles beat me to it" All I could ad is aggresive scraping to try and get the stains off, then go to ROS., various grits as suggested. Yer still gonna have to scrape the corners down though.

Eric
 

Vintage

Member
Joined
16 Jan 2021
Messages
12
Reaction score
2
Location
Manchster M44 5BT
Take a look at Rubio Monocoat oil. I've been using it for years now on wooden kitchen worktops.....never had any issues or failures.
Reading this post with interest, I'm going to re do my worktop.
Does that RMO actually seal it? And how often do you do yours?
I used Osmo oil on a brand new worktop 18 months ago, I wasn't too happy with it .
 

Vintage

Member
Joined
16 Jan 2021
Messages
12
Reaction score
2
Location
Manchster M44 5BT
I'm finally getting round to decorating the kitchen and the worst part is the worktops. They're wood & were originally varnished (Wickes fitted kitchen) but the previous owners weren't exactly careful so it's both worn and stained. I don't really want to go to the expense of new tops so the plan is to refurb them.

Am I right in saying that an orbital sander is the one to use plus a shaped one for the corners? From what I've read a belt sander would probably be too aggressive but I'd like to get the job done as quickly as possible but without causing any damage :)

Secondary question: please can anybody recommend an oil? I've sanded a few patches, tried 3 very different Osmo oil colours and I actually can't see where they've been applied?!
Following this post with interest, its exactaly what id be asking,
(I'm redoing my top too🙈dreading it) I wasnt very happy with osmo oil, didnt think it the sealing lasted, unless I didnt do it right.🤷🏼‍♂️
Good luck with it.
 

dzj

Established Member
Joined
29 Jan 2013
Messages
1,119
Reaction score
126
Location
Serbia
If there's a lot of wear, a belt sander might be called for.
Or if you're a ninja with a smoothing plane, that would work also. :)
It would be best if you could remove it and give yourself some room, perhaps work outside.
Good luck!
 

Danieljw

Those that never make mistakes, never made anythin
Joined
21 Oct 2020
Messages
41
Reaction score
30
Location
Spain
You will regret the day you were born, using a belt sander is a definite no, unless you remove the work top.
Use a cabinet scraper and finish using a quality sanding sheet.
Cheap sandpaper will de laminate and bits of grit will leave nasty marks that you will then have to sand out..
Abrinet is the right move, cuts and clears well, outlast most other sanding sheets.
 
Top