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Vacuum bag hole

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Anonymous

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My vacuum bag has a small split right on the seam - anyone got any idea how I can fix it? Normally when it gets small holes in it I just cover them up with a bit of duct tape, not really a very long lasting solution, I could really do with fixing it up a bit more permanently, the tape method won't work on the seam so I'm a bit stuck!
 

desmoengine

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hi uniB
im guessing your talking of a collection bag on a chip collector?
if it is that type of thing why not use disposable bags.
ive found using cheap pedal bin linners works for me. ok i know some one is going to say that the circumference does not match and yoou cant get a good seal, but you can with a bit of inginuity and duct tap.

dave w
 

Midnight

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if this is a vacuum bag... as in veneer press.... I'd weld a new seam; track it with a soldering iron and straight edge....
 

Adam

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If it's big enough, you could split a cane, sandwich the plastic edge inbetween, then roll it over a couple of times. (then tape it)

Adam
 
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Anonymous

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Sorry Dave, should have specified - it's a vacuum bag for veneering, funnily enought I've just come back from the workshop having emptied my dust extraction bag - not a pleasant task!

Welding it seems like a good idea but how exactly do you use the straight edge and soldering iron?

I tried a similar idea to the cain one, buy clamping 2 peices of wood either side of the split - had to think of something quick or all of my expensive veneer was going to go to waste, kinda worked but there was still air being sucked through it.
 

CHJ

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Try double sided tape.

That is what we used to completely enclose aircraft components in custom one of setups.

We used heat resistant tape because of autoclave temps but domestic variety should be sound for workshop use.
 

Midnight

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Welding it seems like a good idea but how exactly do you use the straight edge and soldering iron?
Place the ruler over the busted weld, bad side outside, track the iron against the edge of the ruler to get a nice straight weld. It's easiest done with a temperature controlled bit, the heat cranked way down. Failing that, gotta use speed to prevent tie iron from burning right through. If the iron's a tad on the wild side (burns no matter what you do) try holding it fractionally above the surface, using radiated heat to make the bond rather than direct heat. It'll take a lot longer, but it's more controllable...
 

Steve Maskery

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In another life I was a magician (sad but true).
Magicians can pour water into a folded newspaper and it disappears, even when the newspaper is turned upside-down (we're just so damn clever).

When welding a polythene bag to a user defined shape, as well as keeping the heat down, sandwich the bag between two layers of brown paper. Silicone baking parchment would be good, I should think.

You'll have to work out your own link between the preceeding two paragraphs.

Cheers
Steve
 
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