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Using a hacksaw cutting big(gish) stuff. Or how to saw a railway line.

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Ttrees

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Had a look at youtube and just found this, so haven't watched it,
I think I've seen it described as a panel hacksaw when I seen it.
At the start he's using what at first glance appears to be a bow saw frame for gardening, if that would do the job it would be handy.
 

mikej460

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Whatever manual route you take you'll end up with forearms like Popeye 💪
 

julianf

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Perfect for the job, though (like you?) I just don't have the room for such a tool.
I recall something not dissimilar in metalwork classes, an 'old' school.
Yeah, I don't really have space for it, and, if it wasn't as perfect for what it's designed for, id have moved it on.

It's not even much good at angles, as the rocking motion tends to upset the clamps, but for straight cuts its way nicer than a horizontal bandsaw.

I mentioned it more out of curiosity than in suggestion that you nipped out and purchased one! : )

Yours is done now, and you live nowhere close anyway, but, if it were not for those two things, I'd have been happy to put it to use on your job, rather than it sit doing nothing for another 6 months!
 

Alpha-Dave

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Good point about tensioning them! As pointed out, you want a straight line, you need a well tensioned saw!

I do wonder what the two upper ?rivets? are all about... though I can't see how they could be used to tension the blade.

Looking at the description, these are for soft material like asbestos panels or plywood, not metals. I suspect that you bend the plate slightly to get the blade on, and that is all the tension you get.
 

Stevekane

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I love the look of the railway line anvil and such a nice thing to have made, but for those that just want a basic “anvil” you could do worse than a lump of RSJ, mine was given to me by an engineer, a 12ins length of flame cut rsj which I think is around 6x8ins. Its cut square at both ends and Ive often thought about tackleing it with the angle grinder to give it a bit of shape,,when Ive nothing else to do I will have a go at it and also neaten it up a bit, however, it lays on the shed floor just inside the door and its surprising how often I pull it out. Its not pretty but I wouldnt want to be without it thats for sure.
 

novocaine

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Put blade at bottom of cut. Remove blade from frame. Turn frame upside down. Put blade back in frame with bottom of frame under workpiece. Retension. Continue cut to finish.
 

AES

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Put blade at bottom of cut. Remove blade from frame. Turn frame upside down. Put blade back in frame with bottom of frame under workpiece. Retension. Continue cut to finish.
Errrrrrr, I'm trying to picture that! My head's hurting. If it would work, it's a great idea novocaine (and NO, I'm not going into the cellar to try it (anyway, I haven't got any spare bits of railway line lying about) :)
 

novocaine

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Think blade upside down in frame. Now think blade right way up but frame upside down.
Its a really dirty site trick and one I've used a few times to eak that last inch out of a cut ( along with turning the pins sideways in one of my many frames to using it with frame to the side)
Afraid to say that i dont have a bit of rail to proof my point either. Nor am i about to go to thw workshop to get a picture. I'm just back from a short run and i need a drink. 🥂
 

Stevekane

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Found this on the internet, seems like an intresting idea, and a neat twist, but it might be worth trying on an rsj too, perhaps a couple of blocks of seasoned oak, top and bottom edges angled to suit an RSJ and bolted through the web with substansial washers spreading the load,,would this make an even firmer anvil substitute? They have started off with rail track but would it work with RSJ?
 

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pe2dave

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Had a look at youtube and just found this, so haven't watched it,
I think I've seen it described as a panel hacksaw when I seen it.
At the start he's using what at first glance appears to be a bow saw frame for gardening, if that would do the job it would be handy.
I note he switches to the Eclipse 55 pretty soon. Agree the bowsaw variant looks a possibility. Thanks for the link.
 

pe2dave

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Put blade at bottom of cut. Remove blade from frame. Turn frame upside down. Put blade back in frame with bottom of frame under workpiece. Retension. Continue cut to finish.
Solid idea, except for the dimensions of the rly line? And its shape? Tip worth remembering for appropriate jobs, thanks.
 

AlanY

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Thus far it has mostly been m8 or m10 threaded bar. The idea of cutting through train track never occurred to me, although I have many miles of abandoned track next door to me, so perhaps...

If I was serous about cutting track, I would try to make thermite. I've always wanted to have a go with thermite. Looks like fun.
Please do the thermite thing and post the video!
 

xy mosian

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By now I suspect Dave might well be into, 'let's just get this job done'. Now I am only a hobby metalworker as and when required. A job like that would give me the heebies. Well done Dave!
The eclipse hacksaw frame uses pins to attach the blade. Hacksaw blades with low tooth count seem to be thin on the ground. Would there be any mileage in using lengths of metal cutting bandsaw blade, with suitable holes? The quality is perhaps likely to be higher and the blade depth could be chosen as needed.
Keep going Popeye!
xy
 

pe2dave

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By now I suspect Dave might well be into, 'let's just get this job done'. Now I am only a hobby metalworker as and when required. A job like that would give me the heebies. Well done Dave!
The eclipse hacksaw frame uses pins to attach the blade. Hacksaw blades with low tooth count seem to be thin on the ground. Would there be any mileage in using lengths of metal cutting bandsaw blade, with suitable holes? The quality is perhaps likely to be higher and the blade depth could be chosen as needed.
Keep going Popeye!
xy
Issue (that I can see) - how to drill holes in bandsaw blades?
Current Eclipse blades are 'welded', brittle teeth and 'soft' body. Guess, bandsaw blades are pretty tough all through? Anyone know?
Perhaps a question for Tuffsaws?
 

Ttrees

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Be interesting to see what you think of them compared.
They seem the best to me from the few I've tried.
Nevertheless are more durable in terms of abuse, and you won't be too miffed even if you couldn't buy just the one.

Have you noticed the hardness being consistent throughout Dave?

Keep her lit!
Tom
 

Stevekane

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Issue (that I can see) - how to drill holes in bandsaw blades?
Current Eclipse blades are 'welded', brittle teeth and 'soft' body. Guess, bandsaw blades are pretty tough all through? Anyone know?
Perhaps a question for Tuffsaws?
Heat the very end and let cool to remove the temper, Ive done this to broken clock springs, you can hold the blade in some crappy pliers or a bit of wet rag to contain the heat but if the blade is held from under the flame just the end should get red quick enough.
 

novocaine

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Next up.

I found a nice piece of armoured copper cable next to the piece of track I was cutting the other day, how do I cut that without getting electrocuted ?
Not worth the agro. Especially as its more likely to be fibre theae days, all the copper got nicked yeara ago. 😂
 
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