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MikeW

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Hi Everyone...

Here's a picture of a handle (Zebrano) reject from the last batch of saws I made a few weeks ago. Fitted some old steel to it. 16 ppi, 8 1/2" blade length with 1 1/2" to the spine. Works wonderfully.



Take care, Mike
 
A

Anonymous

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Really nice! Is the brass back old as well or did you make it?
 

MikeW

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Hi Roger--thank you.

Made the back from new brass. The steel came from a donor saw that I was able to get a larger saw blade out of that left a small piece with a little pitting. Recycled the saw bolts from the donor saw.

Cut new teeth. Filed rip. This portion of the donor blade was near the toe where the steel was the thinnest. There's about .003 combined set--doesn't leave a big kerf, that. Doesn't bind in dry hardwoods, which is what I use most.

I had made some 16 saws and on this handle I was a little tired and drilled the saw bolt / nut holes on the wrong sides, which is why this one was a reject. But, I needed another saw anyway <g>.

The remainder of the blade went into a panel saw with a curly Maple handle.

Mike
 

engineer one

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mike if the screws are on the wrong side does that not make it a
left handed saw, so how is it a reject??
interesting, is there any real reason to suggest screws must go in
one way or another??
surely there are no laws of mechanics to require this?? :wink:

you just want to show off!!!!! :lol:
thought having splurged for a LN dovetail saw i find that the handle has
very sharp corners, is there a reason for this other than economics?
anyone dared to round the corners to make the handle more comfortable. (*,)

nice saw, is the brass half hard, or normal??
paul
 

Jarviser

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Paul - I rounded some of the corners off my L_N Carcass saw handle, but only because I had to, having knocked the corner off putting it away :cry: Problem is the curly maple underneath is lighter than the finish. L-N should explain that Heirloom Quality Tools should never come into contact with wood or people! (AND It took me an hour to steam out a ding and refinish the handle of my L-N plane)

MikeW - BEAUtiful. If you think it's a reject, send it over here and I'll keep it out of sight for you.
 

MikeW

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Everyone...thanks for the compliments.

Frank, only in the sense that the bolts go in from the "wrong" side--which as I sold my LN, makes a saw for me as I'll try not to let it bug me <g>.

Paul, Yep, guess it is a left handed saw. But I'm right handed and I'm not about to learn to cut joints left handed. No offense to the lefties. It's just tradition and what people expect when they purchase a saw is all.

The handle above's horns are not as delicate as a LN as they really are not as thin. Still breakable, though that saw has fallen a few times. Good thing I have rubber mats 'round the bench!.

The horns are an aid in the sense they help keep the saw from slipping. Afraid I don't know the hardness of the brass. I know there's one chance to bend it proper. It'll break if one attempts to work it very much. That's about the extent of my knowledge.

Jarviser...Sending a saw over there can be arranged. Won't even make you pay for the saw. Postage and my packing / handling fee is another thing <g>...

Take care, Mike
 

ydb1md

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Nice saw Mike!

If you ever want me to do some pre-production testing for you, just let me know! ;)
 

Philly

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Mike
You talented git, you! :shock: :lol:
Very pretty, never seen a Zebrano handle before. Works well!
You know where I live (Just in case you run out of people to send saws to....)
Cheers
Philly :D
 

MikeW

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Dave & Philly, thanks for the compliments.

Oh Dave, sorry. But I think the testing phase has concluded. If I had only known you would be interested :wink:

Hi Philly, I've got a few of these Zebrano boards that the stripes are just like you see here. Not too wild, just nice and even.

But if you like that...wait untill you see the figured Black Walnut, or the really impressive figured Maple, or ...

Well, you'll just have to wait until after Thanksgiving...

Take care, Mike
 

ydb1md

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A question about handle design:

Is the grain in the handle supposed to follow the lines of force, to make the handle as strong as possible (approximately from the top horn diagonally down to midway between the screws) or is that unnecessary?
 

MikeW

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Hi Dave,

In an ideal world, a saw handle is a great use for at most turnip sawn, if not flat sawn stock. Using quarter sawn, and those grain lines would ideally be running from the top horn to the screws, as you mention--at least on an open handle design such as this.

The fact of the matter is that there is so much strength to a handle such as this when made from a denser exotic. And while I could not snap the Zebrano handle off, that is the weak point of this handle.

Take care, Mike
 

Pete W

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Beautiful indeed. You be very careful when you come to file the teeth on that one :p
 

MikeW

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Pete W":2mbkwhha said:
Beautiful indeed. You be very careful when you come to file the teeth on that one :p
Hi Pete, thanks.

I see my temporary interenet server is down [again]. So one cannot see the picture as I write this. But the teeth are already filed. 16 ppi, .0015 set to each side. Makes for a non-correctable cut, but tracks once one starts it.

I've been using it for a couple weeks. And I didn't even cut myself <g>. Actually, I've jointed and filed a couple dozen saws since Sunday, the first real work day I've had since "the episode."

Alf...thank you for the compliment.

Take care, Mike
 

Pete W

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MikeW":pibfpjrs said:
I've been using it for a couple weeks. And I didn't even cut myself <g>
Good news on both counts. :)

I've picked up a couple of nice-but-dull saws recently - must provide myself with the wherewithal to start sharpening.
 

ydb1md

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MikeW":2mjpw85h said:
. . .
I've been using it for a couple weeks. And I didn't even cut myself <g>. Actually, I've jointed and filed a couple dozen saws since Sunday, the first real work day I've had since "the episode."
. . .
Since your accident, I've taken to jointing my saws using a different method. I don't use a jointer (or anything else for that matter) to hold my mill file -- although I do have a handle on the file. I hold the file freehand, perpendicular to the blade with a fleam angle between 10 and 20 degrees (enough to keep my fingers away from the teeth). Then I just run the file down the length of the saw. I tried to diagram it in the image below.

 

MikeW

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Hi Dave,

Basically you are draw filing. I usually do so on the last few strokes using a fine file. Nice finish.

The jointer is good to use--one has to be smarter than the set screws though--as it helps ensure the edge of the saw blade is flat down its length. And or it also allows one to control the crown on a breasted saw.

I have two jointers, one that holds a six-inch file and one that holds a 10-inch file. Both allow offsetting the file to use most of the file's surface.

Take care, Mike
 

bugbear

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Basically you are draw filing. I usually do so on the last few strokes using a fine file. Nice finish.
When working on small saws (where I need all the visual aids I can get) I perform a final jointing pass with a india fine stone. This make a very shiny "top" to the tooth, which is helpful.

BugBear
 

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