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flanajb

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Just heard some backing outside, so decided to have a peak around the curtain nets. Another neighbour is having their rotten windows removed from their circa 1900 house and replacing them with the devils windows.

Plastic windows just look so nasty. Such a shame to see so many houses that have been ruined over the years becuase of such a tragedy!
 

Max Power

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Totally agree :( They completely ruin the appearance of old houses,should have been made subject to approval years ago
 

Pete Maddex

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Hi,

The salesmen are even worse, I told one we didn't want any windows and he still kept asking questions, they just don't know when to stop.

Pete
 

flanajb

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Thing is, we live in a conservation area and people just seem to be able to get away with it. The council do nothing to stop it
 

woodbloke

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I like plastic windows...no rubbing down or painting :evil: :evil: :evil: - Rob
 

woodpig

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I went with Direct fix powder coated Aluminium. More expensive but much nicer looking and thinner frames than plastic. Also has a thermal barrier so no condensation problems that you used to get with Aluminium windows.
 

Harbo

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I fitted wooden ones to my house about 20 years ago when PVC was getting a bad name due to failures.
Have to make good the south side ones every few 2 or 3 years with Sikkens - if I did it again would go for aluminum.

What really annoys me is the Glazing units are expiring (misting up internally) and was quite shocked to find they are only guaranteed for 5 or 10 yrs!
I suppose mine have done well to last this long?

Anybody gone down the resealing path?

Rod
 

studders

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Harbo":xm9i2dut said:
What really annoys me is the Glazing units are expiring (misting up internally) and was quite shocked to find they are only guaranteed for 5 or 10 yrs!

Rod
Ditto that.
 

RogerS

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Harbo":39khq1wd said:
I fitted wooden ones to my house about 20 years ago when PVC was getting a bad name due to failures.
Have to make good the south side ones every few 2 or 3 years with Sikkens - if I did it again would go for aluminum.

What really annoys me is the Glazing units are expiring (misting up internally) and was quite shocked to find they are only guaranteed for 5 or 10 yrs!
I suppose mine have done well to last this long?

Anybody gone down the resealing path?

Rod
Sorry Rod to hear they are misting. How were they put in?
 

bosshogg

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In a previous post, I made my position clear as to the abhorrence of PVC, windows, doors and the like.
One thing that anyone thinking to replace their windows or doors, but particularly windows...their is evidence that some properties are devalued by the installation of replacement uPVC windows to traditional style houses. Where styles such as Georgian, Edwardian and even more up to date houses, designed for traditional windows that have been replaced, appear to be the worst affected...be warned
Cheers...bosshogg :)
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
William Shakespeare (hammer)
 

Digit

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When I was renovating our last house, a late 18C coaching Inn I dicussed this with an estate agent. He was horrified and said aunder no circumstances.
The new owner has fitted white plastic DG units, in an 18C house!
I'm currently installing DIY twin pane sealed units into wooden frames, look much better.

Roy.
 

Harbo

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Sorry Roger they were installed by a Glazing Co. 20yrs ago.
I had a few replaced last year but a lot more have gone this year!

Rod
 

xy mosian

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I made some timber framed double glazed windows for this house 18 years ago. I was suprised to see that the glazing material, putty/mastic, specified that the whole of the gap around the dg units be filled. Didn't have one blow in the 16 years they were in. A joiner fitted another half dozen some 8 years later, he refused to fill the gaps saying it wasn't needed. All but one of his dg units blew within 7 or 8 years.

xy
 

RogerS

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It really is quite fascinating. There seem to be so many different points of view. And to my mind it depends on the installation. The conclusions that I have come to are that the only reason why you get condensation inside is if there is a leak in the mastic and the unit is sitting in water. So what they advocate with timber windows are a gap all round the units and weep holes at the bottom so that if any water gets an ingress then it can leak away. So if the dgu springs a leak then there is no water to suck up into the unit as the window heats up ...expels air as it expands but then as it cools and the air pressure inside drops, then any water is sucked up inside.

And then there's the other approach..as xy says..to fill the gap with glazing material so there is no room for the water to go and even if the unit develops a leak then not even normal air can get in...let alone water.
 

Digit

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Or what I have done Rog. Single pane in the conventional manner, sub frame inside that rebated to take a rubber seal, pane of glass then beading to hold that in place.
That way the two panes can move how they damn well like.

Roy.
 

Digit

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Yep! A small sachet to see how things go over the winter.

Roy.
 

Max Power

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Id be amazed if you don't get condensation forming on the inner surfaces of what is in effect fixed secondary glazing Digit, but time will tell
 

Harbo

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My new replacement glazing units are surrounded in mastic - should have taken notice when they took the old ones out?
A strange thing is that one of the failed units in my front porch has about 25mm of water sitting in the bottom. Water must be getting in from the top but I cannot see any holes or gaps?

Rod
 
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