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Up and over garage door replacement?

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mAtKINItice

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Hi all,

If all goes to plan we will be the owner of a new house soon with a reasonable size garage. I plan on converting the garage into a workshop, however it comes with a up and over door. I was considering my options here and figured you would be able to provide some guidance.

I'm thinking about removing the door and framing up the opening. Here there would be two openings, a door or set of french doors with a small ish window on the side. The door would provide access to the rear of the property and the window would give extra light. I aim to paint everything white and fit some extra lights. The right side of the garage is the neighbours property so here I'll batten and board out - most likely with MDF to reduce and dampen noise. Floor will most likely be a chipboard floating floor.

Does this sound reasonable? My only question really comes down to the replacement of the door. Has anyone done anything similar? One of the neighbours appears to have done this already - so I'll ask them what they did. In terms of planning permission I'd have to find out more. I've seen lots of similar builds with brick/block but this is usually for rooms attached to the house. This is completely separate and IMO would be much better insulated than the door currently.

Construction would be a standard frame, 600C with openings for the door/window. Then the usual insulation wrapped with breathable membrane. As this is attached to the front of the house I'll consider using the same sheathing used on part of the upper of the building - basically UPVC cladding instead of wooden feather edged boards.

In terms of the base of the frame, the drive is slopped though does have good drainage in front. That being said am I right in my assumption that adding the 3 brick plinth as the foundation with DPC is the way to go? In other words I'm doing the standard "mike shed build" but just one wall, instead of four.

Any guidance is much appreciated - I did have a 6m x 3m shop planned earlier in the year but due to Covid that house fell through. Hopefully sharing this build will be a good enough replacement.

Many thanks.
 

fezman

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Hi,

I cant comment on the rest of your build, but i did recently replace my up and over garage door. I went for Side Hinged doors at around £1200 fitted.
They are much better. I have no grief over any planning issues, neighbours don't know any different, and I can now completely box off the last 2/3rds of the garage as a workshop and access the front 1/3rd and roof space without any problem.

HTH
F
 

Lonsdale73

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I'm another one who replaced the up'n'over with wooden side-hinged doors. They look much nicer than the up'n'over and I was a,azed at how much more room they opend up. Now puzzling where it all went to. I didn't pay anywhere near £1200 for mine, I got them from a company in Hull, as I recall. Admittedly, they're not hardwood and after a lengthy saga my 77 year old father-in-law came over to 'help' me fit them, by which I mean he did all the work with me passing him whatever tool he asked for!

As for lights, I have two 600mm LED panels, mounted side by side in a frame, suspended from the joist on lengths of steel cable pulled taut so I can slide them back and forth to which ever area of the garage I'm working in. Even the father-in-law was impressed with that idea!
 

Aquachiefofficer

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I went for an aluminium electric roller door both for ease of use and space saving reasons. It eliminates the repeat painting and doesn't need planning permission.
 

robgul

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We had our very tired up and over garage door replaced this very day with traditional looking side-hung doors - made in aluminium, double-skinned with insulation and draught-proof seals all round. They did cost rather more than £1,200 but as an investment in the appearance of the house (we only moved here in Feb 20) - and creation of a much better workshop we were prepared to spend a bit.

I had already "dis-engaged" the up and over rail mechanism to make more usable wall space and room on the ceiling to mount a Record Air Filter (above head height, with a remote control unit).
 

Padster

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I'm a plus one for replacing my up and over, but I went for the electric roller door with remote. This gave me the greatest flexibility it saved room, gave me a better door, I didn't even need the insulated version as the fit is way better than an up and over. Should we choose to move at any point it also easily allows a new owner to cover back to a garage (with tens of sockets and good lighting lol). Cost was about £1000 fitted and they took away the old.
 

Lonsdale73

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One of the first things I did on having the up'n'over replaced was to fit some coat hooks on the inside of one of the doors so I;d have somewhere to hang my overalls and yet I still do this:

ukw.jpg
 

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