Unequal bevel on Sorby Bowl gouge

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scooby

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Thanks for suggestions. I wasn’t aware that changing the projection of the gouge from the holder made much difference but will happily give it a go. Is there a sharpening setup that uses a flat belt sander to avoid the concave bevel?
Theres nothing wrong with a concave bevel. Having a concave bevel on some tools (skew, scrapers, etc) will allow you to easily hone the edge with a diamond card to save going back to the grinder as often.

Sorby Pro Edge is a belt sharpener so will give a flat bevel. Its an expensive (but worth it imo) bit of kit. Or you could make an abrasive disc to fit on your lathe.
Again, nothing wrong with a concave bevel though. There are people who like/dislike both flat and concave.

Before I got a Pro Edge, I used a 6" grinder and I can't tell any difference (not talented enough) between flat and concave.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Thanks for suggestions. I wasn’t aware that changing the projection of the gouge from the holder made much difference but will happily give it a go. Is there a sharpening setup that uses a flat belt sander to avoid the concave bevel?
I would think the grind in your picture perfect for a spindle gouge but too acute for a bowl gouge, certainly for anyone inexperienced. Try a grind with it not projecting so far, and when you find the perfect projection glue a stop on the base so that you can repeat it easily. Glue different stops for different grinds (label them), it saves messing about and more importantly tool steel - you can grind your perfectly shaped tool in one swing from one side to the other if the protrusion is identical to the one you used before.
 

Phil Pascoe

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I would think the grind in your picture perfect for a spindle gouge but too acute for a bowl gouge, certainly for anyone inexperienced. Try a grind with it not projecting so far, and when you find the perfect projection glue a stop on the base so that you can repeat it easily. Glue different stops for different grinds (label them), it saves messing about and more importantly tool steel - you can grind your perfectly shaped tool in one swing from one side to the other if the protrusion is identical to the one you used before.


Edit - I should have ideally rather than perfectly - perfect for you might be different from perfect for someone else.
 

Bob Chapman

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They meant to avoid a concave cutting edge. The cutting edge should be straight or slightly convex. A concave BEVEL is pretty standard. I think your best bet would be to find an experienced turner and have lessons as soon as covid allows.
 

Kerrowman

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Some success!

I have played around with the tool projection distance etc and have managed to match the grind I got back from the shop (without running the wheel).

Also after seeing a video mentioned a while back I have precisely cut a block of wood to set the jig distance exactly and repeatably (see pics).

Now when I come to sharpen I will waste minimal metal and get the shape I’m happy with, even if it turns out to be a little bit concave 😊
 

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scooby

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Good to see you're making progress. (y)
The measuring block is a good idea, but don't forgot the wheel diameter will change over time. Not a big problem as (unless its getting heavy use) it won't decrease fast. Just something to keep in mind, you could either make a block that references off the face of the wheel to your jig arm pocket or use your existing one and check (periodically) to see if there is a light gap between the wheel and gouge.

Don't worry about that for now and just give the gouge a try.
 

Jacob

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Some serious over-thinking going on?
I'd just have a go with it, then sharpen it freehand as best you can if needed and see what difference it makes. It's a learning curve - you don't learn if you don't do it and instead depend on gadgets/jigs/magic numbers.
 

Jacob

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Sorby pro edge plus gadgets £500?
Sorby bowl gouge £40 ish?
 

scooby

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Under and over pricing in one post..impressive.

Not that I'm suggesting its a must have item, but you can get the Pro Edge and all the stuff you need for turning tools for way less than that.
 

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