Quantcast

Underfloor Dust Extraction

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Les Mahon

Established Member
Joined
7 Oct 2004
Messages
366
Reaction score
0
Location
Cork, Ireland
Hi All,

Been searching around the forum for information on dust extraction, and there is a wealth of it! I have just one question at the moment, what do people reckon to running soil pipe for extraction under the floor? I was thinking about this for my (ancient) kity combi as the pipes would be out of the way, but anyone got any thoughts on this? The pipe getting clogged is one worry I have, but really not sure.

The reason for asking is that although it will be a while before I need to put any further work into dust extraction, now would be the time for under floor stuff.....


Thanks
Les
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
sounds like a dream idea - just leave some inspection covers at key points in case of problems

Must be better than overhead as gravity is initially working with you rather than against as in the overhead approach
 

tim

Established Member
Joined
5 Nov 2004
Messages
2,307
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire
Les,

I've been thinking about exactly the same thing. I don't think there will be too much of a prob as long as the underfloor bit is straight and short. I plan to put in a 2m length to take it from the wall to just off the centre of the work shop ie almost under the sawbench. If there is a blockage at any point then it isn't going to be too awkward to clear - certainly a drain rod would sort it in seconds. I'm not sure I'd be so confident about putting a bunch of bends in and being able to clear the blockage.

Cheers

Tim
 

Scott

Established Member
Joined
18 Oct 2004
Messages
846
Reaction score
0
"John's Workshop" or whatever it was called. On Home & Leisure.

John Revell had some firm do his entire workshop extraction underfloor (in metal ducting) IIRC

Scott
 

Les Mahon

Established Member
Joined
7 Oct 2004
Messages
366
Reaction score
0
Location
Cork, Ireland
Scott,

I remember seeing that nbow that you mention it - but IIRC his floor was suspended so he could lift it and get at the pipe work... I'm thinking of pouring 10 tons of concrete over it!

I think I'll probably just fire some pipes in, if it doesn't work I can always go for a plan B, worth it for the small outlay on pipe, much easier than wishin I'd done it down the line!

Thnkas for the feedback
Les
 

Scott

Established Member
Joined
18 Oct 2004
Messages
846
Reaction score
0
Aye, that's right. I think he was using chipboard or ply.

Best of luck
Scott
 
G

Guest

Guest
I saw on This Old House once where drain pipes had an extended piece on each bend with a screwed cap so any blockage could be cleared by removing the cap and rodding.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Les

Even with 10 tons of concrete on it, you could still leave access points where any joints or elbows are located which will allow access to clear blockages :wink:

I would love to do something similar but my garage was already built when we bought the house
 

frank

Established Member
Joined
10 Sep 2003
Messages
938
Reaction score
0
Location
cheshire
les how do they clear a blockage in under ground soil pipes :wink: go for it and dont put any very tight bends in the pipe run if you do get a blockage use the drain rods with the metal screw on the end, with the dust extractor switched on 8) 8)
 

DaveL

Established Member
Joined
19 Oct 2002
Messages
4,674
Reaction score
0
Location
Sudbury, Suffolk
Les,

I have used soil pipe overhead in my shop, works OK.

If you need bends use two 45's instead of one 90 to give a smoother curve. Last thing you need is a sudden change in direction as the reduction in air speed around the bend will tend to drop the carried dust. This is what I have done and have never had a problem. :D
 

Bean

Established Member
Joined
12 Jan 2004
Messages
1,518
Reaction score
0
Location
scouting about
I will second Dave's and the the advice of others, the most important bit is to keep the run as straight as you can with rodding points at each end......... Just in case :wink:


Bean
 

Keith Smith

Established Member
Joined
1 Mar 2004
Messages
511
Reaction score
0
Location
Out in the sticks in rural Shropshire
If you have a machine in the middle of the workshop then an underground duct would be a good idea but other than that I would keep it above ground.

My reasoning is that all sorts of pieces get sucked into the system and if the extractor is powerful enough to lift it 3ft then it is probably going to be able to suck it along the duct. If it can't it stays in the hose by the machine it is easy to clear out.

Another slight problem is that if you wanted to fit blast gates they would be at a low level.

If you do go for it I would use "rest bends" or better still "long radius bends" for any bends in the duct.

Keith
 

tim

Established Member
Joined
5 Nov 2004
Messages
2,307
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire
Les,

Prompted by your thread I finally put my money where my mouth is and put in some underfloor extraction yesterday. I didn't have as much clearance under my wooden floor as I thought (forgotten I'd put down 2" kingspan as ground insulation) so with a quick change of plan I used flat ducting that is used on top of kitchen cabinets.

I know some of you will be sucking through your teeth at reduced suction rates/ decreased volumes etc but I figured that most stuff that comes off my TS (which is all it will be used for) is pretty tiny and anyway the flat duct appears more efficient than the ribbed hose I was using before.

The run is c 2m and I put 'flat to round' elbows on each end, using those cheaty wall plates to bring them through the floor at both ends and solvent welded a 6" length of round pipe vertically at each end - which still allows for rodding if needs but makes it easier to connect to the saw and extractor.

Works a treat and while I was at it, I aslo ran a flex through the void to put a socket for theh TS plug (to be soft wired at the other end for the benefit of the P reg police :x ).

So no more tripping over cables or pipe. Now to get the rest of the ducting sytem in and get the bloomin' extractor outside the workshop so that it doesn't take up so much space.

BTW got all the bits from Screwfix - plus I ordered one of those hanging cube socket outlets as well (to make up the free delivery bit) really good and cheaper than Axminster. It appears that Screwfix might finally have got their act back together.

Cheers

Tim
 

Les Mahon

Established Member
Joined
7 Oct 2004
Messages
366
Reaction score
0
Location
Cork, Ireland
Tim,

excellent - now I know there has been a guinea pig, I'm going for it :wink:

Have to be done in the next couple of days as the concrete laying guys are due on saturday - fingers crossed!

Don't say things like "screwfix" to me - makes me green, they won't deliver to Ireland! Off to the plumbing supplies for me. Now if I can just persuade SWMBO's dad down when it comes to plumbing the finished dust extraction in we'll be laughing, he is a wizard at making plastic pipe go where you want with application of a gas torch, looks easy but it requires serious practice to not melt or kink the pipes.


Les
 

tim

Established Member
Joined
5 Nov 2004
Messages
2,307
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire
Actually I don't think a guinea pig would fit down it but worth a try :lol:

Are you going to put down any kind of timber floor over the concrete? So much kinder on the knees and back (and warmer too).

Cheers

Tim
 

frank

Established Member
Joined
10 Sep 2003
Messages
938
Reaction score
0
Location
cheshire
les is that the walls to your industrial unit in the photo :lol: :lol: :lol: man that will be some shop.
 

Les Mahon

Established Member
Joined
7 Oct 2004
Messages
366
Reaction score
0
Location
Cork, Ireland
Frank,

The walls have been like that since we took on the house a year ago, I have got by so far with "no point rendering & painting them, sure I'll probably want to put a workshop in down there..." sooo the dodgy walls and the fact that my current "workshop" is the second bedroom has allowed me to jump the workshop up the list of "projects"

Tim,

I intend to put that chipboard T&G paneling in as a floor, can't strech to Laminate flooring like some i've seen around here :shock:

Les
 

tim

Established Member
Joined
5 Nov 2004
Messages
2,307
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire
Roger,
Here they are:

http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?ts=10856&id=61084

For once they have too much chain and too much flex but its unbelievably useful and has got rid of that really irritating snagging of flexes on edge of work or fear of cutting a lovely ogee profile into 3 core flex.

I imagine its the kind of prob that Alf struggles with all the time with all the old cloth covered cables that those old planes come with :lol: :lol:

Cheers

Tim
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
tim":2eyrjlv8 said:
I imagine its the kind of prob that Alf struggles with all the time with all the old cloth covered cables that those old planes come with :lol: :lol:
As it happens I'm experimenting with hanging cords and such from one of those retractable dog leads hung above the bench. The idea being the cord and vac hose will be allowed to move with the tool but also be pulled back out of the way as required. I say experimenting, but I keep forgetting I've set it up... :oops:

Sorry, a serious answer to a joke. Bad habit.

Cheers, Alf
 
Top