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Tyzack tenon saw re-worked

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MikeG.

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Some while ago I got a whole collection of nasty plastic handled tenon saws with a view to re-handling one or two of them for my son in law, who is new to woodworking and somewhat short of tools. With christmas as an excuse, I picked one of them to work on. Turns out it was a Tyzack:





It was originally painted black, it seems. Anyway, it cut nicely (14 TPI, cross-cut teeth), teeth and plate were all fine. I've got some others, and a nice piece of bog oak, so I decided to cut out 4 at once:







I cleaned up to the line with a belt sander, rasps and files:



Next step was to round-over on the router table. Please, if you're a beginner, don't do this. The chance of catching an end grain and having the work phlicked* around and your fingers pulled into the cutter are extremely high:





Note that the round-over doesn't extent onto the bit which sits over the plate. Square edges make marking out for the holes and the cut much easier. I started the cut using a saw packed up to the right height to cut on the mid-line of the handle, and rubbing the work against the teeth. This establishes a neat line rather easier than trying to mark out with a gauge and then following that line with a saw, freehand:





That little orange-handled Stanley, by the way, is next on the list. Twenty TPI rip cut, small, nice brass back....it'll make a beautiful dovetail saw. Anyway, onwards:



Drill out the holes, carefully cut out for the spine, clean up the blade, spend quite a while sanding the handle, then oil/ varnish/ white spirit mix wiped on and off once a day for 3 or 4 days, then screw it all together:







..and a reminder of how it was:





* Naughty words censor doesn't like fli-ck. Sheesh.........
 

Cheshirechappie

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That's about ten grades better than the plastic version. A comfortable handle makes a big difference to a saw's usability.
 

Dovetaildave

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The handle maketh the saw...........the saw maketh the man..........the man maketh the handle ...........
 

ED65

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That is a wonderful transformation, great job Mike.

If I could just add one further safety note though: file handles!
 

Cheshirechappie

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MikeG.":tajin8u2 said:
Does anyone actually hold a file by the handle? I've contemplated cutting the tangs........
I think it depends a bit how the workpiece is held.

If it's gripped in the vice (or otherwise immobilised) so that both hands are available to hold the file, then yes - tip of handle nestled in palm of hand, fingers lightly wrapped round, fingers of off-hand gripping tip end of file. You can file quite accurately, or impart a fair bit of force if required.

If the workpiece is held in the off-hand, then clearly it's natural to grip the file rather nearer the toothed bit. It's much easier like that to orient workpiece and file on awkward, curved shapes (like saw handles!) so that wrist angles are more comfortable whatever the angle of attack. I think I'd still like a handle though - tang dug into palm is not pleasant, and if your fingers slip on the file, nasty gash results. The engineering and machine shop types are very hot on not using files without handles, for that reason - especially filing in the lathe. One catch, and you've got a gash right up your forearm.

Some people stick a golf-ball shaped 'knob' or 'handle' on the tang instead of the conventional version. Not entirely without merit - the round shape nestles more nicely in the palm than something more nearly resembling the chamfered-off end of a dowel.
 

MikeG.

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Cheshirechappie":10gzp9fj said:
........If it's gripped in the vice (or otherwise immobilised) so that both hands are available to hold the file, then yes - tip of handle nestled in palm of hand, fingers lightly wrapped round, fingers of off-hand gripping tip end of file. You can file quite accurately, or impart a fair bit of force if required.......
I still find myself holding it on the body, albeit near the shoulders, even when the file has a handle (as probably half of mine have). I must try harder!! :D
 

ED65

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MikeG.":1uoo1z64 said:
Does anyone actually hold a file by the handle?
Well judging by the smoothing of the arrises and grime buildup on my own handles, and the worn-in filth I've seen on those of a great many files I've restored, I'd say yes!

MikeG.":1uoo1z64 said:
I've contemplated cutting the tangs........
Well there are files, like the four-in-hand, which come that way so it must be reasonably safe. As long as the back is rounded and edges are relieved after the tang is cut or snapped off I don't see why you shouldn't take them off if it suits the way you grip your files.
 

ED65

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For anyone who won't be doing the above no excuse to use a tanged file without a handle, what with commercial ones costing as little as a quid a piece and presentable, ergonomic DIY handles taking just minutes to make (no ferrule is needed so much faster than otherwise).

Handles like this are a useful way to use up short offcuts and even softwood can do in a pinch, or the wood could be sourced for free from branches or saplings of various native trees and shrubs, and some garden species too.
 
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