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Adam

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I've been given one of these


However it doesn't come with a motor, nor any cutting tools, and its a good while (school actually) since I did any metalwork. At that time, we had good quality lathes, with pumped lubricant, a technician to sharpen the cutting tools etc etc(not allowed on the grinding wheel then :cry: ).. Anyway what I want to know is, you can buy a motor from the UK distributor (peatol) but is their a better solution? i.e cheaper? Any recommendations for some basic tools? parting tool, LH and RH etc?

Adam
 

Chris Knight

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Adam,
You can do a surprising amount with those small lathes - I once had a Cowells and did a lot with it, including cutting some 2 inch diameter threaded pieces - although the Cowells did have a lead screw!

These days you can pick up cheap sets of carbide tipped tools or better still, a holder and separate tips. Chronos http://www.chronos.ltd.uk/ is pretty good for that sort of thing. For a parting tool, I recommend a holder and HSS parting tool stock.
 

jasonB

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As Chris says Chronos are a good source of turning tools, one of the sets of carbide tipped 6mm tools should fit the bill . The only problem with the separate parting tool & holders will be finding one that fits the toolpost, but there is usually one included in the carbide sets set.

I started out with a Emco Unimat 3 which is about the same size, made quite a few things on it including one of the small Stuart vertical steam engines.

Jason
 

jasonB

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Plenty of links here including motor suppliers, methods of mounting the motor etc. :) Mostly US sites though :(

Jason
 

GCR

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Adam

As far as a motor goes, you don't need that much power. 300W should be more than enough. The problem is finding an inexpensive one. Have you considered purchasing a cheap pillar drill - £30.00ish at DIY outlets and using that motor (discarding the rest)?? Seems a waste but you do get a quiet running 1400rpm with mounting feet.

Bob
 

jasonB

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Main thing with the motor is getting one with the correct (11mm) shaft so the matched pulley will fit, that way the belt can be placed on any of the six grooves without having to move the motor to get the tension correct.

You could always turn up an adapter, but you need the lathe running for that, sort of chicken & egg situation :D

Jason
 

Adam

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Thanks for the links guys - I'll have a look through them.

Adam
 

PhilipL

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There is a very good book produced by the maker of Sherline lathes which you might like to look at. I picked it up when I was learning how to use a metal lathe (the other good book is Sparey's) and had no prior experience - not even at school since they made me take Latin.

See http://www.sherline.com/bookplug.htm

Philip
 
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