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AndrewP

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I am currently in the process of building a Japanese trestle and beam "workbench" (after the style of Imai and Swenson as described in the Workbench Book by Landis.) Anyone here got any experience of working with this type of setup? If so, what are your thoughts on its' strengths and weaknesses? Any shorcuts to learning would be greatly appreciated.
Andrew :?:
 

Philly

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Hi Andy
Haven't had any experience myself-just curious!
Are you using Jap tools exclusively? Do you have the Toshio Odate book (I think there was some info on it in there) ?
Let us know how you get on,
Philly :D
 

Chris Knight

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Andrew,

Over on Woodcentral in the hand tools section there is a poster called Pam Niedermayer who has done this. I can't find the reference in the search facility and it may have been back in the days of Badger Pond - a now deceased forum. However a message posted there will surely bring a response.

Meanwhile how about an avatar of you sitting on the floor chopping a mortice whilst gripping the wood in your Japanese carpenter socks?
 

Alf

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waterhead37":3pj7vlpb said:
Over on Woodcentral in the hand tools section there is a poster called Pam Niedermayer who has done this.
I'm betting Andrew is the same Andrew who's already asked over on WC, yes?

It's all a closed book to me too, I'm afraid. But I'd very much like to hear how you get on and your thoughts on it.

Cheers, Alf
 

Alf

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waterhead37":bk5u93rz said:
I hadn't spotted that - I must get out more often :roll:
Evidently you're getting out more than me - who was the sad so-and-so who made the link? :oops: :lol:

Cheers, Alf
 

AndrewP

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Ok it's a fair cop guv, it was the same me over on W.C.
I'm casting around for any extra info as there doesn't seem an awful lot about anywhere. I've also got quite a bit of help from the guys over on the HMS enterprises "Japanese woodworking" forum, though it isn't highly active at present.
It all started when I was pondering about building a bench; I read Landis and loved the simplisity of the Roubo bench, and thought I might go for something like that (only easier to build!) and yes I have been reading Adam Cherubini posts on W.C.
When I got to the Japanese chapter in Landis I was even more taken by the even greater simplisity, and the easier build, so I decide to give it a try.
I don't use entirely Japanese tools, I paid for my LN low angle, Jack so I'm going to use it! But I am taken by Japanese saws, and I do cut closer to the lines I meant to cut when I'm using them; kneeling on the floor so I can follow lines on two surfaces of the timber.
I'm half way through building the trestles, and I'll keep you posted as to how I get on. No digital camera yet unfortunately though.
Thanks for the interest
Andrew :)
 

Philly

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Andy
I was looking in Toshio Odate's book "Japanese Woodworking Tools-their tradition, spirit and use"-the first chapter covers the workshop and the planing beam. Not huge amounts of info but pretty much all you need to get going.
I really recommend this book if you have any interest in Jap tools!
Cheers
Philly :D
 

AndrewP

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Thanks Philly
I have got the Odate book, but the setup I'm aiming for is different to the one he uses. This is two fairly robust trestles, with the beam or beams across the top of them, so they are horizontal more like a traditional "bench."
This means you can do more tasks on them, rather than just planing; sawing, chopping, paring, the full works. Planing is still done into a stop or stops, and I can't see any reason why you can't push a plane towards a stop just the same as the Japanese traditionally pull a plane towards a stop.
I'm planning two beams made of face glued 2 by 6's, one around 12" wide, and the other around 8" wide. A 1 by as wide as I can get lying between them as a tool well.
The advantages I see in this setup is that it is easy to build, and very flexible, so ideally suited to a beginner like myself who isn't too skilled and who isn't sure how he is going to end up working.

Andrew
"If you want to make god laugh, tell him your plans!"
 

Philly

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Andy
Do you have the FWW book "Bench Tools"? On page 18 there is a chapter on trestle workbenches (jap style) by Drew Langsner. Right what you are suggesting-I could send you a copy of the article is you want?
Cheers
Philly :D
 
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