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CHJ

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That looks pretty good from just a bandsaw circle jig style cut, guess getting width perfect enough for no central 'clearance' hole may be a little more difficult, it's not easy to achieve consistently with my method either.

But for most projects where a central knob or other feature is used that level of cutting accuracy is irrelevant.
Be interesting to see what the glue lines look like when turned and finished.

Good to see someone trying something different, personally I get as much satisfaction out of solving an oddball assembly method as the actual turning.
 

Linus

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That looks pretty good from just a bandsaw circle jig style cut, guess getting width perfect enough for no central 'clearance' hole may be a little more difficult, it's not easy to achieve consistently with my method either.

But for most projects where a central knob or other feature is used that level of cutting accuracy is irrelevant.
Be interesting to see what the glue lines look like when turned and finished.

Good to see someone trying something different, personally I get as much satisfaction out of solving an oddball assembly method as the actual turning.
Yes I do like a challenge! Now I have the method I intend to follow up with "proper wood" and see how it turns out. I actually drilled the central clearance hole out after cutting. The segments can be cut off one at a time if required to maintain a complete disc. It's just the last segment that gets difficult.
 

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Linus

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That looks pretty good from just a bandsaw circle jig style cut, guess getting width perfect enough for no central 'clearance' hole may be a little more difficult, it's not easy to achieve consistently with my method either.

But for most projects where a central knob or other feature is used that level of cutting accuracy is irrelevant.
Be interesting to see what the glue lines look like when turned and finished.

Good to see someone trying something different, personally I get as much satisfaction out of solving an oddball assembly method as the actual turning.
Hi Chas
Found a different method for cutting the segments. Here they are straight off the bandsaw, no sanding. Cherry and Keruing. Not perfect but better. Still have the hole in the middle but that's going to be difficult to avoid if segments are to align, and as you say, academic if you have a button there. I'll post a pic after glue-up.
 

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CHJ

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Compliments on your Bandsaw skills, a little discrepancy between inner and outer radius? Blade thickness perhaps?
 

Linus

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Compliments on your Bandsaw skills, a little discrepancy between inner and outer radius? Blade thickness perhaps?
Thank you. Yes, wasn't the most accurate, but I was working on a smaller radius so most of that should(?) disappear when glued up and cut to round. I was too busy exploring different ways of doing it . Voyage of discovery it seems! What I would like to say is thank you for the various WIPs you have posted as they are extremely informative and inspiring to say the least. Re the sawing, I transposed the circular cut to a linear cut (if that makes sense) so the number of segments is not limited (see picture). I think with care this should be capable of producing repetitive accurate segments. I think accurate layout may also help somewhat.😇
 

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Cooper

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Chaz, like many others on this thread I am in awe of your skill and range. I have looked on your website and seen even more brilliant pieces. I have a question how do you turn the bottoms of your pieces? They don't seem to have an undercut for the chuck to grip. I thought I had worked it out, that once you had finished the inside you turned it around and pressed it on a taper and held it in place with a pad on a live centre, so you could work on the foot. But looking at a piece made of apple that doesn't have a complete rim I can't see how that would stay on centre on a taper. If you had any pictures of how you hold the work would be really helpful.
Thanks
Martin
 

CHJ

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I have a question how do you turn the bottoms of your pieces?
If you work your way through some of the WIP linked on my site you should see several methods dependant upon construct rim form, usually using Cole or wooden jaws.

However for Natural Edge items I try to a partially complete the base when forming the holding socket or spigot to aid tailstock support when finishing.

Although the 'Pot' is rather a crude form This post from 2010 may help
 

Cooper

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Although the 'Pot' is rather a crude form This post from 2010 may help
Thanks, that is exactly what I was looking for. It answers my question.
There is crude and crude, I'd say yours was most accomplished compared to my crude!!
In the third picture on the top row you have the long jaws which fit inside the hole you have bored. I do a lot of turning between centres and sometimes want to work on a piece without the centre support. I have a patriot chuck which really isn't much good at holding a cylinder/bar as it doesn't have the depth. I have been wondering if some jaws like yours would be what I need. Do you find them sturdy enough to hold an unsupported piece?
Cheers
Martin
 

CHJ

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... I have a patriot chuck which really isn't much good at holding a cylinder/bar as it doesn't have the depth. I have been wondering if some jaws like yours would be what I need. Do you find them sturdy enough to hold an unsupported piece?
...
Mine are Axminster brand and I find them more than robust enough, obviously common sense needs to be applied but I have not managed to distort them to date.

Here's a closer view of them and as they are now used fitted to a Axminster 125mm chuck

Not sure Patriot make similar to fit their chucks, there may be some compatible ones from another retailer.
 

Linus

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Compliments on your Bandsaw skills, a little discrepancy between inner and outer radius? Blade thickness perhaps?
Hi Chas
Still working on the swirls but waiting a better bandsaw blade from Tuffsaws before trying again. Meanwhile, I followed your WIP on boxes on your website and came up with this. Ash, purpleheart and oak. Not a patch on your standard but I'm quite chuffed with it. They say that imitation is the highest form of flattery:)
 

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CHJ

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Hope it gave you satisfaction in the making, simple segmentation to construct an item can add another level of interest and I found it a good way of improving turning skills, techniques, and lathe holding methods without undue repetition.
The fact it can reduce the costs of basic wood stocks being a bonus.
 

Linus

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Hope it gave you satisfaction in the making, simple segmentation to construct an item can add another level of interest and I found it a good way of improving turning skills, techniques, and lathe holding methods without undue repetition.
The fact it can reduce the costs of basic wood stocks being a bonus.
The price of timber........I'll say amen to that!
 

Linus

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Hope it gave you satisfaction in the making, simple segmentation to construct an item can add another level of interest and I found it a good way of improving turning skills, techniques, and lathe holding methods without undue repetition.
The fact it can reduce the costs of basic wood stocks being a bonus.
Hi Chas

Just a different tack on the swirly top!
 

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CHJ

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Hi Chas

Just a different tack on the swirly top!
Compliments on the segmented top, looks like you are now well and truly in the 'addicted' category.

You need to start posting in your own threads rather than your work getting lost in this old thread.
 

Linus

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Compliments on the segmented top, looks like you are now well and truly in the 'addicted' category.

You need to start posting in your own threads rather than your work getting lost in this old thread.
I just wanted to say thank you for your guidance and the knowledge you shared.

I'll let you know when I get the swirl right!:unsure:
 

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