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Tulipwood, beech, or "summat else" for a face frame kitchen?

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RogerM

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If you were making a faceframe kitchen for your own home, with a painted finish, what would you use - tulipwood, unsteamed beech or steamed beech? What advantages does steamed beech have over unsteamed? Or would you use something else entirely if this was for your own use and not a commercial decision? I want to get started on the faceframes pdq so would appreciate some early guidance. Thanks.
 

jasonB

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I would use beech over Tulip as I find Tulip a bit soft for kitchens, OK for bedrooms or bookshelves etc. Don't find much difference between steamed or unsteamed.

J
 

RogerM

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Concensus here and in another place is :-

Beech - 2
tulipwood - 1
Redwood - 1

Hardly overwhelming support for any of them. :D Looks like it's not a critical decision - I'll be placing my order for a timber of my choice at midday tomorrow.
 

eribaMotters

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I have not made a lot of kitchens, only 6 or 7. All have been birch ply or from melamine faced mdf carcases with a mahogany plant on the bottom edge where they sit on the floor [if I have not used adjustable legs]. Front frames and doors have been either mahogany or tulip wood. Beech is not stable enough across its width, mahogany resists the knocks and paints well, but poplar/tulip wood whilst softer is more stable and paints a treat. It is my first choice.

Colin
 

Phil Sewell

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I made my painted kitchen using tulipwood. it's survived well although only me using it. a few dents can be filled when you re paint.

Any painted in door stuff I do is usually in tulipwood.

My experience with beech is it's a bit unstable, you might end up with doors in twist.

P
 
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