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Trueing a hand-made tenon

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Anonymous

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my (hand-made) mortises never have exactly the same size, so I have to work on the tenons. The best way (I found) to trim them is with a Stanley #71



(more details here)

Can you agree ?
Cheers
Alberto

P.S. perhaps this does not apply to German WW's... :D
 

Midnight

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That's a use for the router that I never woulda thought of Alberto. Having only recently aquired one of these myself, I'll have to give that a try sometime... thanks.!!!!
 

wjordan

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mantrakalas":1ny7zcr5 said:
perhaps this does not apply to German WW's... :D
At least we would use a wooden router.
I just looked again into one of those old books and found that it mentions the possibility to saw off the line. But then you are on your own. Thanks for pointing out this method.

Wolfgang
 
A

Anonymous

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That's exactly the method DC mentions in vol 1 of his pair of books - 'The truth about tenons'. A tailed devil router can be used in the same manner, for the Normites out there.
 
A

Anonymous

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Another way is to use the LN rabbet block plane.

If you have one that is :lol: :lol:

Cheers

Tony
 
A

Anonymous

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Tony":1oz2echj said:
Another way is to use the LN rabbet block plane.
May I pinpoint the two main advantages of using a hand router:

1. it shaves always parallel to the stock and
2. by shaving both sides of the tenon at every micro-regulation of the iron, the shoulders are always even (and the tenon is always in the middle of the stock).

In other words, it works exactly the same way an electric router does but ... more quietly, less stress and lower risk of ... exaggerating !

Cheers
Alberto

P.S. and it's cheaper than a LN rabbet block plane :twisted: !
 

Bean

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I have one and I am aware of how to use it, but not of how to shapen it. The Iron has seen some action :roll:

I assume that you simply sharpen the bottom If this is right can someone confirm, if not please put me right. Ta


Bean
 
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Anonymous

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Bean":20q4ovca said:
I assume that you simply sharpen the bottom
well... I first sharpen the bevel upside down by hand-and-eye (i.e. without any jig) on an oilstone and then the bottom, to eliminate the small burr. So far so good ... !

Cheers
Alberto
 

Alf

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BugBear's your man for this. I have a couple of router cutters you could do surgery with that he sharpened. Talk about Scary Sharp! :shock: The key is his Ultimate Sharpening Jig and patience. Lots of patience. More than I have for sure. :oops: For mere mortals, Alberto's technique is what I use too.

Cheers, Alf
 

J.A.S

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I have to confess that I've recently used this method successfully with a tailed router :oops: . I hope my Galoot In Training licence won't be revoked.

It's doubly helpful if you use the block as a fence for for the router, as well as just a thickness constant. That is, if you bring the block more to left of where the diagram has it, and have it ride against the end grain of several would-be tenons clamped together. Hence, you can get accurate and square shoulders, without the danger of cutting past the line.

I imagine that everyone's thought of this, so hope you'll all forgive this beginner's stating of the bleeding obvious.

Jeremy
 
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